Taboo

taboossexual tabooimpolitesocial tabootabuharamhorrorinvisible forms of disciplinesexual prohibitionssexual taboos
A taboo is an implicit prohibition on something (usually against an utterance or behavior) based on a cultural sense that it is excessively repulsive or, perhaps, too sacred for ordinary people.wikipedia
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Tapu (Polynesian culture)

taputabutaboo
The term "taboo" comes from the Tongan tapu or Fijian tabu ("prohibited", "disallowed", "forbidden"), related among others to the Maori tapu and Hawaiian kapu.
The English word taboo derives from this later meaning and dates from Captain James Cook's visit to Tonga in 1777.

Incest taboo

incestban intermarriagehalf-brother/half-sister union
Sigmund Freud speculated that incest and patricide were the only two universal taboos and formed the basis of civilization.
All human cultures have norms that exclude certain close relatives from those considered suitable or permissible sexual or marriage partners, making such relationships taboo.

Incest

incestuousincestuous relationshipincestual
However, although cannibalism, in-group murder, and incest are taboo in the majority of societies, exceptions can be found, such as marriages between brothers and sisters in Roman Egypt.
The incest taboo is one of the most widespread of all cultural taboos, both in present and in past societies.

Food and drink prohibitions

dietary lawsTaboo food and drinkdietary law
Common taboos involve restrictions or ritual regulation of killing and hunting; sex and sexual relationships; reproduction; the dead and their graves; as well as food and dining (primarily cannibalism and dietary laws such as vegetarianism, kashrut, and halal) or religious (treif and haram).
Many of these prohibitions constitute taboos.

Taboo on the dead

Taboo against naming the deada person's name becomes a taboo word immediately following their deathancestors
Common taboos involve restrictions or ritual regulation of killing and hunting; sex and sexual relationships; reproduction; the dead and their graves; as well as food and dining (primarily cannibalism and dietary laws such as vegetarianism, kashrut, and halal) or religious (treif and haram).
The taboo on the dead includes the taboo against touching of the dead and those surrounding them; the taboo against mourners of the dead; and the taboo against anything associated with the dead.

Fady (taboo)

fadyFady'' (taboo)
In Madagascar, a strong code of taboos, known as fady, constantly change and are formed from new experiences.
Fady, in Malagasy culture, refers to a wide range of cultural prohibitions or taboos.

Racism

racistracial prejudiceracial discrimination
Some argue that contemporary Western multicultural societies have taboos against tribalisms (for example, ethnocentrism and nationalism) and prejudices (racism, sexism, and religious extremism).
It has been suggested that, while in many countries overt or explicit racism has become increasingly taboo, even among those who display egalitarian explicit attitudes, an implicit or aversive racism is still maintained subconsciously.

Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
Common taboos involve restrictions or ritual regulation of killing and hunting; sex and sexual relationships; reproduction; the dead and their graves; as well as food and dining (primarily cannibalism and dietary laws such as vegetarianism, kashrut, and halal) or religious (treif and haram).
Some people, while not vegetarians, refuse to eat the flesh of certain animals due to cultural taboo, such as cats, dogs, horses or rabbits.

Haram

haraamforbiddenḥarām
Common taboos involve restrictions or ritual regulation of killing and hunting; sex and sexual relationships; reproduction; the dead and their graves; as well as food and dining (primarily cannibalism and dietary laws such as vegetarianism, kashrut, and halal) or religious (treif and haram).

Prohibition of drugs

illegal drugsillegal drugdrug prohibition
Changing social customs and standards also create new taboos, such as bans on slavery; extension of the pedophilia taboo to ephebophilia; prohibitions on alcohol, tobacco, or psychopharmaceutical consumption (particularly among pregnant women); and the employment of politically correct euphemisms – at times quite unsuccessfully – to mitigate various alleged forms of discrimination.

Social stigma

stigmastigmatizedstigmatization
In medicine, professionals who practice in ethical and moral grey areas, or fields subject to social stigma such as late termination of pregnancy, may refrain from public discussion of their practice.

Customary law

customcustomarycustoms
On a comparative basis taboos, for example related to food items, seem to make no sense at all as what may be declared unfit for one group by custom or religion may be perfectly acceptable to another.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
On a comparative basis taboos, for example related to food items, seem to make no sense at all as what may be declared unfit for one group by custom or religion may be perfectly acceptable to another.

Community

communitiescommunalsmall community
Taboos can help use a resource more efficiently, but when applied to only a subsection of the community they can also serve to suppress a subsection of the community.

Tribe

tribaltribestribals
A taboo acknowledged by a particular group or tribe as part of their ways, aids in the cohesion of the group, helps that particular group to stand out and maintain its identity in the face of others and therefore creates a feeling of "belonging".

Social science

social sciencessocial scientistsocial
The meaning of the word "taboo" has been somewhat expanded in the social sciences to strong prohibitions relating to any area of human activity or custom that is sacred or forbidden based on moral judgment, religious beliefs, or cultural norms.

Morality

moralmoralsmoral code
The meaning of the word "taboo" has been somewhat expanded in the social sciences to strong prohibitions relating to any area of human activity or custom that is sacred or forbidden based on moral judgment, religious beliefs, or cultural norms.

Social norm

social normsnormsnorm
The meaning of the word "taboo" has been somewhat expanded in the social sciences to strong prohibitions relating to any area of human activity or custom that is sacred or forbidden based on moral judgment, religious beliefs, or cultural norms.

Tongan language

TonganTongaton
The term "taboo" comes from the Tongan tapu or Fijian tabu ("prohibited", "disallowed", "forbidden"), related among others to the Maori tapu and Hawaiian kapu.

Fijian language

FijianiTaukeiBau Fijian
The term "taboo" comes from the Tongan tapu or Fijian tabu ("prohibited", "disallowed", "forbidden"), related among others to the Maori tapu and Hawaiian kapu.

Māori language

MāoriMaorite reo Māori
The term "taboo" comes from the Tongan tapu or Fijian tabu ("prohibited", "disallowed", "forbidden"), related among others to the Maori tapu and Hawaiian kapu.

Hawaiian language

HawaiianHawaiian forHawaii
The term "taboo" comes from the Tongan tapu or Fijian tabu ("prohibited", "disallowed", "forbidden"), related among others to the Maori tapu and Hawaiian kapu.

James Cook

Captain CookCaptain James CookCook
Its English use dates to 1777 when the British explorer James Cook visited Tonga, and referred to the Tongans' use of the term "taboo" for "any thing is forbidden to be eaten, or made use of".

Tonga

Kingdom of TongaFriendly IslandsTongan
Its English use dates to 1777 when the British explorer James Cook visited Tonga, and referred to the Tongans' use of the term "taboo" for "any thing is forbidden to be eaten, or made use of".

Demographics of Tonga

TonganTongansLanguages of Tonga
Its English use dates to 1777 when the British explorer James Cook visited Tonga, and referred to the Tongans' use of the term "taboo" for "any thing is forbidden to be eaten, or made use of".