Taboo on the dead

Taboo against naming the deada person's name becomes a taboo word immediately following their deathancestorsavoid using his personal namedeadname is never spokenname-avoidance taboo situation
The taboo on the dead includes the taboo against touching of the dead and those surrounding them; the taboo against mourners of the dead; and the taboo against anything associated with the dead.wikipedia
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Word taboo

taboo wordlexical replacementtaboo
A taboo against naming the dead is a kind of word taboo whereby the name of a recently deceased person, and any other words similar to it in sound, may not be uttered.
The taboo against naming the dead in parts of the world is an example.

Taboo

taboossexual tabooimpolite
The taboo on the dead includes the taboo against touching of the dead and those surrounding them; the taboo against mourners of the dead; and the taboo against anything associated with the dead.
Common taboos involve restrictions or ritual regulation of killing and hunting; sex and sexual relationships; reproduction; the dead and their graves; as well as food and dining (primarily cannibalism and dietary laws such as vegetarianism, kashrut, and halal) or religious (treif and haram).

Yolngu

Yolngu peopleYolgnuYolŋu
After a Yolngu man named Bitjingu died, the word bithiwul "no; nothing" was avoided.

Australian Aboriginal avoidance practices

avoidanceAvoidance relationshipsAboriginal naming customs
In some Australian Aboriginal cultural practices, the dead are not referred to by their name directly as a mark of respect.

Secwepemc

ShuswapShuswap peopleSecwepemc Nation
Among the Shuswaps of British Columbia widows and widowers in mourning are secluded and forbidden to touch their own head or body; the cups and cooking vessels which they use may be used by no one else.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
Among the Shuswaps of British Columbia widows and widowers in mourning are secluded and forbidden to touch their own head or body; the cups and cooking vessels which they use may be used by no one else.

Palawan

Palawan ProvinceIsland of PalawanPalawan Island
Among the Agutainos, who inhabit Palawan, the Philippines, a widow may not leave her hut for seven or eight days after the death; and even then she may only go out at an hour when is not likely to meet anybody, for whoever looks upon her dies a sudden death.

Philippines

FilipinoPhilippinePhilippine Islands
Among the Agutainos, who inhabit Palawan, the Philippines, a widow may not leave her hut for seven or eight days after the death; and even then she may only go out at an hour when is not likely to meet anybody, for whoever looks upon her dies a sudden death.

Aboriginal Australians

AboriginalAustralian AboriginalAboriginal Australian
It is observed by peoples from all over the world, including Australia, Siberia, Southern India, the Sahara, and the Americas.

Siberia

SiberianEastern SiberiaEast Siberia
It is observed by peoples from all over the world, including Australia, Siberia, Southern India, the Sahara, and the Americas.

South India

Southern IndiaSouth IndianPeninsular India
It is observed by peoples from all over the world, including Australia, Siberia, Southern India, the Sahara, and the Americas.

Sahara

Sahara DesertSaharanSaharan Desert
It is observed by peoples from all over the world, including Australia, Siberia, Southern India, the Sahara, and the Americas.

Guaycuru peoples

GuaycuruGuaycuruanGuaycurú
Among the Guaycurus of Paraguay, when a death had taken place, the chief used to change the name of every member of the tribe; and from that moment everybody remembered his new name just as if he had borne it all his life.

Paraguay

ParaguayanRepublic of ParaguayEstablished
Among the Guaycurus of Paraguay, when a death had taken place, the chief used to change the name of every member of the tribe; and from that moment everybody remembered his new name just as if he had borne it all his life.

Synonym

synonymssyn.synonymous
In its place, a synonym or a loanword from another language would be used for a certain period, after which the original word could be used again; but in some cases the replacement word would continue to be used.

Loanword

loanwordsloan wordborrowed
In its place, a synonym or a loanword from another language would be used for a certain period, after which the original word could be used again; but in some cases the replacement word would continue to be used.

Pitjantjatjara

Pitjantjatjara peoplePitjantjaraPitjantjajara
In Pitjantjatjara, for instance, it is common to refer to a recently deceased person as 'kunmanara', which means "what's his name".

Australian Aboriginal kinship

skin nameskin groupkinship
The person can still be referred to in a roundabout way, such as "that old lady" or by generic skin type but not by first name.

Maasai people

MaasaiMasaiMaasai tribe
The Maasai of East Africa resort to the device of changing the dead person's name immediately after their death; the person may then be mentioned freely under the new name while all the restrictions remain attached to the old one.

East Africa

Eastern AfricaEastEastern
The Maasai of East Africa resort to the device of changing the dead person's name immediately after their death; the person may then be mentioned freely under the new name while all the restrictions remain attached to the old one.

Kaurna

Kaurna peopleNantuwwarayerta
Among the Kaurna and Ramindjeri tribes of South Australia, the repugnance to mentioning the names of those who have died lately is carried so far that persons who bear the same name as the deceased abandon it, and either adopt temporary names or are known by any others that happen to belong to them.

Ramindjeri

Among the Kaurna and Ramindjeri tribes of South Australia, the repugnance to mentioning the names of those who have died lately is carried so far that persons who bear the same name as the deceased abandon it, and either adopt temporary names or are known by any others that happen to belong to them.