Tag questionwikipedia
A tag question (also known as tail question) is a grammatical structure in which a declarative or an imperative statement is turned into interrogative fragment (the "tag").
tag questiontag questionsquestion tagtag-question

Interrogative

interrogativeinterrogative sentenceinterrogative mood
A tag question (also known as tail question) is a grammatical structure in which a declarative or an imperative statement is turned into interrogative fragment (the "tag").
Tag questions are questions "tagged" onto the end of sentences to invite confirmation, as in "She left earlier, didn't she?"

Ain't

ain'tAint
Standard dialects that regard ain't as non-standard often substitute aren't for am not in tag questions (e.g., "I'm doing okay, aren't I?"), while leaving the "amn't gap" open in declarative statements.

Multicultural London English

Multicultural LondonJafaicanEnglish with borrowed expressions
As an all-purpose tag the Multicultural London English set-phrase innit (for "isn't it") is only used with falling patterns:
* Innit, a reduction of 'isn't it', has a third discourse function in MLE, in addition to the widespread usage as a tag-question or a follow-up as in [1] and [2] below.

Politeness

politenesspolitepolitely
They can be an indicator of politeness, hedging, consensus seeking, emphasis and/or irony.

Intonation (linguistics)

intonationintonationalintonations
English tag questions can have a rising or a falling intonation pattern.

Do-support

do''-supportdo-supportinserted
If the verb is in the present perfect, for example, the tag question uses has or have; if the verb is in a present progressive form, the tag is formed with am, are, is; if the verb is in a tense which does not normally use an auxiliary, like the present simple, the auxiliary is taken from the emphatic do form; and if the sentence has a modal auxiliary, this is echoed in the tag:

Dutch language

DutchDutch-languagenl
The tag hey? (of Afrikaans and Dutch origin) is used in South African English.
In a tag question the word order is the same as in a declarative clause:

Eh

ehCanadian "eh?
It is also commonly used as an alternative to the question tag right?, i.e., method for inciting a reply, as in "It's nice here, eh?"

Subject (grammar)

subjectsubjectsgrammatical subject
(A sentence such as It was John who broke the window is more complex still.) Sentences beginning with a locative phrase, such as There is a problem, isn't there?, in which the tag question 'isn't there?' seems to imply that the subject is the adverb 'there', also create difficulties for the definition of subject.

Languages of Wales

Official languages
Examples of this include the use by some speakers of the tag question isn't it? regardless of the form of the preceding statement and the placement of the subject and the verb after the predicate for emphasis, e.g.

Language and gender

language and gendergender and languagegenderlect
These include tag questions, question intonation, and "weak" directives, among others (see also Speech practices associated with gender, below).

Third-person pronoun

gender-neutral pronoungender-neutralgender-specific pronoun
In some West Country dialects, the pronoun er can be used in place of either he or she, although only in weak (unstressed) positions such as in tag questions.

Affect (linguistics)

affectspeaker affectaffected
Affects such as sarcasm, contempt, dismissal, distaste, disgust, disbelief, exasperation, boredom, anger, joy, respect or disrespect, sympathy, pity, gratitude, wonder, admiration, humility, and awe are frequently conveyed through paralinguistic mechanisms such as intonation, facial expression, and gesture, and thus require recourse to punctuation or emoticons when reduced to writing, but there are grammatical and lexical expressions of affect as well, such as pejorative and approbative or laudative expressions or inflections, adversative forms, honorific and deferential language, interrogatives and tag questions, and some types of evidentiality.

Question

questionwh-questionanswer
Tag questions are a grammatical structure in which a declarative statement or an imperative is turned into a question by adding an interrogative fragment (the "tag"), such as right in "You remembered the eggs, right?", or isn't it in "It's cold today, isn't it?"

Kansai dialect

Kansai dialectKansai accentOsaka dialect
The emphasis or tag question particle jan ka in the casual speech of Kanto changes to yan ka in Kansai.

Verb phrase ellipsis

verb phrase ellipsisVP-ellipsisshortened sentences
A particularly frequent construction in which VP-ellipsis (obligatorily) occurs is the tag question:

Welsh English

WelshWalesWelsh accent
Examples of this include the use by some speakers of the tag question isn't it? regardless of the form of the preceding statement and the placement of the subject and the verb after the predicate for emphasis, e.g.

Hedge (linguistics)

hedginghedgehedges
Typically, they are adjectives or adverbs, but can also consist of clauses such as one use of tag questions.

Quebec French syntax

*Particle "-tu" used (1) to form tag questions ((2) and sometimes to express exclamatative sentences):

English modal verbs

modal verbsshalldouble modal
Modals can appear in tag questions and other elliptical sentences without the governed verb being expressed: ...can he?; I mustn't.; Would they?

Small talk

small talkchitchatPointless babble
It may be either a question, or a statement of opinion with a tag question.

Bernese German

BerneseBernese dialectBernese German dialect
An often used word at the end of a sentence is a question tag, "gäu" (2nd person singular) or "gäuet" (2nd person plural, polite form) meaning 'isn't it?', whereas other Swiss German dialects prefer "oder", like 'or what?'.

English grammar

Englishgrammarthere is
The dummy subject can undergo inversion, Is there a test today? and Never has there been a man such as this. It can also appear without a corresponding logical subject, in short sentences and question tags: ''There wasn't a discussion, was there?

Veridicality

veridicalnonveridicalitynonveridic
(tag questions based on negative sentences exhibit even more such bias), can sometimes be seen as downward entailing, this approach cannot account for the general case, such as the above example where the context is perfectly neutral.