Tagalog language

TagalogTagalog-languageFilipinoTagalog (Filipino)Tagalog/FilipinoOld TagalogTagalog wordTagalog-speakingTagalophonetgl
Tagalog ) is an Austronesian language spoken as a first language by a quarter of the population of the Philippines and as a second language by the majority.wikipedia
3,276 Related Articles

Austronesian languages

AustronesianAustronesian languageAustronesian language family
Tagalog ) is an Austronesian language spoken as a first language by a quarter of the population of the Philippines and as a second language by the majority.
Major Austronesian languages include Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Javanese, and Filipino (Tagalog).

Philippine English

EnglishEnglish-languagePhilippine
Its standardized form, officially named Filipino, is the national language of the Philippines, and is one of two official languages alongside English.
English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog).

Bisayan languages

VisayanVisayan languagesVisayan language
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy. It is closely related to the languages spoken in the Bicol Region and the Visayas islands, such as the Bikol group and the Visayan group, including Waray-Waray, Hiligaynon and Cebuano.
They are most closely related to Tagalog and the Bikol languages, all of which are part of the Central Philippine languages.

Filipino language

FilipinoTagalogSpoken languages
Its standardized form, officially named Filipino, is the national language of the Philippines, and is one of two official languages alongside English.
It is a standardized variety of the Tagalog language, an Austronesian regional language that is widely spoken in the Philippines.

Baybayin

TagalogBaybayin scriptTagalog script
The Doctrina was written in Spanish and two transcriptions of Tagalog; one in the ancient, then-current Baybayin script and the other in an early Spanish attempt at a Latin orthography for the language.
The term baybayín literally means "to spell, write, and syllabize" in Tagalog.

Malagasy language

MalagasyBetsimisarakamlg
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy. Being Malayo-Polynesian, it is related to other Austronesian languages, such as Malagasy, Javanese, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Tetum (of Timor), and Yami (of Taiwan).

Central Philippine languages

Central PhilippineCentral Philippine languageCentral
Tagalog differs from its Central Philippine counterparts with its treatment of the Proto-Philippine schwa vowel.
They are also the most populous, including Tagalog (and Filipino), Bikol, and the major Visayan languages Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Waray, Kinaray-a, and Tausug, with some forty languages altogether.

Florante at Laura

Florante
The indigenous poet Francisco Baltazar (1788–1862) is regarded as the foremost Tagalog writer, his most notable work being the early 19th-century epic Florante at Laura.
Florante at Laura ("Florante and Laura") (full title: ''Pinagdaanang Buhay nina Florante at Laura sa Kahariang Albanya: Kinuha sa madlang "cuadro histórico" o pinturang nagsasabi sa mga nangyari nang unang panahon sa Imperyo ng Gresya at tinula ng isang matuwain sa bersong Tagalog''; English: The History of Florante and Laura in the Kingdom of Albania: Adapted from some "historical pictures" or paintings that tell of what happened in early times in the Greek Empire, and were set to rhyme by one delighting in Tagalog verse), written by Francisco Balagtas, is considered as one of the masterpieces of Philippine literature.

Vocabulario de la lengua tagala

Pedro de San BuenaventuraDictionary of the Tagalog language
Further compilation of his substantial work was prepared by P. Juan de Noceda and P. Pedro de Sanlucar and published as Vocabulario de la Lengua Tagala in Manila in 1754 and then repeatedly reedited, with the last edition being in 2013 in Manila.
Vocabulario de la lengua tagala is the first dictionary of the Tagalog language in the Philippines.

Hawaiian language

HawaiianHawaiian forHawaii
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy.

Batangas Tagalog

BatangasBatangan TagalogBatangueño
Ethnologue lists Manila, Lubang, Marinduque, Bataan (Western Central Luzon), Batangas, Bulacan (Eastern Central Luzon), Tanay-Paete (Rizal-Laguna), and Tayabas (Quezon) as dialects of Tagalog; however, there appear to be four main dialects, of which the aforementioned are a part: Northern (exemplified by the Bulacan dialect), Central (including Manila), Southern (exemplified by Batangas), and Marinduque.
Batangas Tagalog (more properly Batangan, Batangueño or Batangenyo ) is a dialect of the Tagalog language that is spoken primarily in the province of Batangas and in portions of Quezon, Laguna and on the island of Mindoro.

Cebuano language

CebuanoVisayanCebuano-speaking
It is closely related to the languages spoken in the Bicol Region and the Visayas islands, such as the Bikol group and the Visayan group, including Waray-Waray, Hiligaynon and Cebuano.
While Filipino (Tagalog) has the most number of speakers of Philippine languages, Cebuano had the largest native language-speaking population in the Philippines until about the 1980s.

Indonesian language

IndonesianBahasa IndonesiaIndonesia
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy. Being Malayo-Polynesian, it is related to other Austronesian languages, such as Malagasy, Javanese, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Tetum (of Timor), and Yami (of Taiwan).

Luzon

Luzon IslandNorthern LuzonLuzon, Philippines
The Tagalog homeland, Katagalugan, covers roughly much of the central to southern parts of the island of Luzon—particularly in Aurora, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, Metro Manila, Nueva Ecija, Quezon, Rizal and Zambales.
The name Luzon is thought to derive from the Tagalog word lusong, which is a large wooden mortar used in dehusking rice.

Cavite

Cavite ProvinceCavite, PhilippinesProvince of Cavite
The Tagalog homeland, Katagalugan, covers roughly much of the central to southern parts of the island of Luzon—particularly in Aurora, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, Metro Manila, Nueva Ecija, Quezon, Rizal and Zambales.
The name "Cavite" comes from the Hispanicized form of kawit or it may be a corruption of kalawit, Tagalog words for "hook", in reference to the small hook-shaped peninsula jutting out to Manila Bay.

Philippine languages

PhilippinePhilippine languageFilipino
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy.

Batangas

Batangas ProvinceBatangueñoBalayan Province
The Tagalog homeland, Katagalugan, covers roughly much of the central to southern parts of the island of Luzon—particularly in Aurora, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, Metro Manila, Nueva Ecija, Quezon, Rizal and Zambales. The Batangas accent has been featured in film and television and Filipino actor Leo Martinez speaks with this accent.
It is derived Tagalog batangan which refers to a type of tough mangrove wood used in building the large rounded beams (also called batangan) across the traditional outriggers (katig) of Filipino bangka boats.

Malayo-Polynesian languages

Malayo-PolynesianMalayo-Polynesian languageMalayo-Polynesian language group
Being Malayo-Polynesian, it is related to other Austronesian languages, such as Malagasy, Javanese, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Tetum (of Timor), and Yami (of Taiwan).
Malayo-Polynesian languages with more than five million speakers are: Malay (including Indonesian), Javanese, Sundanese, Tagalog, Malagasy, Cebuano, Madurese, Ilocano, Hiligaynon, and Minangkabau.

Filipinos

FilipinoFilipinaFilipino people
The Batangas accent has been featured in film and television and Filipino actor Leo Martinez speaks with this accent.
The lack of the letter "F" in the pre-1987 Tagalog alphabet (Abakada) caused the letter "P" to be substituted for "F", though the alphabets and/or writing scripts of some non-Tagalog ethnic groups included the letter "F".

Proto-Philippine language

Proto-Philippine
Tagalog differs from its Central Philippine counterparts with its treatment of the Proto-Philippine schwa vowel.
Used in this reconstruction were nine languages—Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Waray, Bikol (Central?), Ilokano, Ibanag, Ifugao, and Kankanaey—with the rationale that the aforementioned have "relatively better structural description and vocabularies" than other related and geographically contiguous languages at that time.

Bicol Region

BicolBicolandiaRegion V
It is closely related to the languages spoken in the Bicol Region and the Visayas islands, such as the Bikol group and the Visayan group, including Waray-Waray, Hiligaynon and Cebuano.
The people of the Bicol Region, called Bicolanos, speak any of the several languages of the Bikol language family, called Bikol macrolanguages, an Austronesian languages closely grouped under the Central Philippine languages family such as the Visayan languages and Tagalog.

Pablo Clain

Paul KleinPaul Klein (missionary)Pavel Klein
The first substantial dictionary of the Tagalog language was written by the Czech Jesuit missionary Pablo Clain in the beginning of the 18th century.
Klein is known for writing a standardized Tagalog dictionary as well as the first person to describe Palau for the Europeans and to draw the historically first map of Palau, an act which practically equated to the discovery of Palau.

Manila

Manila, PhilippinesCity of ManilaMaynila
For example, in some parts of Manila, a strong pronunciation of i exists and vowel-switching of o and u exists so words like "gising" (to wake) is pronounced as "giseng" with a strong 'e' and the word "tagu-taguan" (hide-and-go-seek) is pronounced as "tago-tagoan" with a mild 'o'.
The native Tagalog name for the indigo plant, tayum (or variations thereof) actually finds use in another toponym within the Manila area — Tayuman ("where the indigo [plant] is") — and elsewhere in the Philippines (e.g., Tayum, Abra; Tagum, Davao del Norte).

Pangasinan language

PangasinanPangasinensePangasinenses
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy.
The ancient Pangasinan script, which is related to the Tagalog Baybayin script, was derived from the Javanese Kawi script of Indonesia and the Vatteluttu or Pallava script of South India.

Manuel L. Quezon

Manuel QuezonManuel Luis QuezonQuezon
President Manuel L. Quezon then, on December 30, 1937, proclaimed the selection of the Tagalog language to be used as the basis for the evolution and adoption of the national language of the Philippines.
Following a year's study, the Institute of the National Language – established in 1936 – recommended that Tagalog be adopted as the basis for the national language.