Tahirids (Yemen)

TahirideTahiridsYemenBanu TaherTahiridAltaheri (Tahirid)Tahirid dynastyTahirids dynasty
The Tahirids were an Arab Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen from 1454 to 1517.wikipedia
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Yemen

Republic of YemenYemeniJemen
The Tahirids were an Arab Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen from 1454 to 1517.
The weakening of the Rasulid provided an opportunity for the Banu Taher clan to take over and establish themselves as the new rulers of Yemen in 1454 CE.

Rasulid dynasty

RasulidRasulidsYemen
They succeeded the Rasulid Dynasty and were themselves replaced by the Mamluks of Egypt after only 63 years in power. They were trustees of the sultans of the Rasulid Dynasty (1229-1454) and were frequently called in to quell rebellions towards the close of the dynasty.
The new ruling clan governed Yemen from 1454-1517 as the Tahirid dynasty.

Imams of Yemen

King of YemenImam of Yemencomplete list
The Zaidi Shia imams, although split between various claimants in the northern highlands, were mostly able to resist Tahirid rule.
Beginning with the conquest of Yemen by the family of Salah ad-Din ibn Ayyub (Saladin) in 1174, a series of dynasties exercised a modicum of control and administration in Yemen for roughly the next 400 years; these are, in chronological sequence, the Ayyubids, from 1174 to 1229; the Rasulids, from 1229 to 1454; the Tahirids, from 1454 to 1517; and the Mamluks, from 1517 to 1538, when the Ottoman Empire took the Yemeni Tihama.

Al-Mutawakkil Yahya Sharaf ad-Din

The infuriated Husain al-Kurdi sought and found willing allies in Yemen itself, including the Zaydiyya imam al-Mutawakkil Yahya Sharaf ad-Din, the Sulaimani sharif Izz ad-Din bin Ahmad, and the warlord Abu Bakr bin Maqbul of Luhayyah.
The Tahiride Dynasty ruled the lowlands and southern highlands from Ta'izz, and had recently sacked the Zaidi capital San'a.

List of Sunni dynasties

List of Sunni Muslim dynastiesIslamic sultanateList of Muslim dynasties

Battle of Diu (1509)

Battle of DiuDiudecisively beaten
However, Husain al-Kurdi's ships were decisively beaten by the Portuguese off Diu, India in 1509.
They had to spend the monsoon season on the island of Kamaran and called at Aden at the tip of the Red Sea, where they got involved in costly local politics with the Tahirid Emir, before finally crossing the Indian Ocean.

Al-Mutawakkil al-Mutahhar

The first sultan az-Zafir Amir sent an army against the imam al-Mutawakkil al-Mutahhar in 1458, but it was defeated and the sultan's brother Muhammad bin Tahir was killed.
A new lowland power, the Tahiride Dynasty, took over in 1454.

History of Yemen

YemenYemeni Kingdoms520 or 525 invasion of Yemen
The weakening of the Rasulids provided an opportunity for the Banu Taher clan to take over and establish themselves as the new rulers of Yemen in 1454.

Siege of Aden

Adenattack on Adenlaid siege to the city
This time, az-Zafir Amir II, who had recently beaten off a Portuguese attack on Aden, refused to provide resources to the Mamluks.

Arabs

ArabArab peopleArabian
The Tahirids were an Arab Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen from 1454 to 1517.

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
The Tahirids were an Arab Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen from 1454 to 1517.

Magnate

magnatesmogulMagnat
The Tahir were Yemeni magnates who originated from the area of Juban and al-Miqranah, about 80 km south of Rada'a.

Juban District

and JubanJuban
The Tahir were Yemeni magnates who originated from the area of Juban and al-Miqranah, about 80 km south of Rada'a.

Sultan

SultanateSultansSulṭān
They were trustees of the sultans of the Rasulid Dynasty (1229-1454) and were frequently called in to quell rebellions towards the close of the dynasty.

Lahij

LahejLahjAl Houta
Lahij, north of Aden, was taken over by them in 1443, and in 1454, the important port of Aden was swiftly taken by the brothers Amir and Ali bin Tahir and thereby detached from the Rasulids.

Aden

Aden, YemenLittle AdenPort of Aden
Lahij, north of Aden, was taken over by them in 1443, and in 1454, the important port of Aden was swiftly taken by the brothers Amir and Ali bin Tahir and thereby detached from the Rasulids.

Mecca

MakkahMecca, Saudi ArabiaMakka
The last sultan, al-Mas'ud Abu al-Qasim, gave up any hope of maintaining his throne and withdrew to Mecca in the same year.

Malik

MalekMelikmlk
The eldest of the brothers, Amir bin Tahir, took the titles sultan and king (malik) with the regnal name Salah ad-Din al-Malik az-Zafir Amir (r.

Zabid

ZabīdHistoric Town of ZabidZubayd
1454-1460). The sultans used to spend the summers in Juban and al-Miqranah, with good access to the southern highlands, using Zabid in the lowland as their winter capital.

Rada'a District

Rada'aRadaRada' District
The Tahir were Yemeni magnates who originated from the area of Juban and al-Miqranah, about 80 km south of Rada'a.

Madrasa

madrasahmadrassamedrese
Arguably their best known monument is the Amiriyya madrasa in Rada'a from 1504.

Tihamah

TihamaTihāmahcoast
Like their predecessors they ruled in the first place in the Tihama lowland and the southern highlands.

Ash-Shihr

ShihrAsh ShihrAl-Sheher
Shihr in Hadramawt was taken in 1457; however, it was lost at the end of the fifteenth century to the Kathiri princedom that controlled much of the interior of Hadramawt.

Hadhramaut

HadramautHadramawtHadhramawt
Shihr in Hadramawt was taken in 1457; however, it was lost at the end of the fifteenth century to the Kathiri princedom that controlled much of the interior of Hadramawt.

Kathiri

Banu KathirKathiri StateKathiri State of Seiyun in Hadhramaut
Shihr in Hadramawt was taken in 1457; however, it was lost at the end of the fifteenth century to the Kathiri princedom that controlled much of the interior of Hadramawt.