Tammany Hall

TammanyTammany SocietySociety of St. TammanyTammany menTweed Ringat the timecity's Democratic political machineColumbian OrderJames J. Kelsomachine politics of the city
Tammany Hall, also known as the Society of St. Tammany, the Sons of St. Tammany, or the Columbian Order, was a New York City political organization founded in 1786 and incorporated on May 12, 1789, as the Tammany Society.wikipedia
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William M. Tweed

Boss TweedTweed RingWilliam Tweed
However, Tammany Hall also served as an engine for graft and political corruption, perhaps most infamously under Scottish Quaker William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid-19th century.
William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878) – often erroneously referred to as "William Marcy Tweed" (see below), and widely known as "Boss" Tweed – was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State.

Al Smith

Alfred E. SmithSmithAlfred Emanuel Smith
By 1872 Tammany had an Irish Catholic "boss," and in 1928 a Tammany hero, New York Governor Al Smith, won the Democratic presidential nomination.
Like many other New York politicians of his era, he was also linked to the notorious Tammany Hall political machine that controlled New York City's politics, although he remained personally untarnished by corruption.

Fernando Wood

Mozart Hall Democrats
It typically controlled Democratic Party nominations and political patronage in Manhattan after the mayoral victory of Fernando Wood in 1854, and used its patronage resources to build a loyal, well-rewarded core of district and precinct leaders; after 1850 the great majority were Irish Catholics.
A successful shipping merchant who became Grand Sachem of the political machine known as Tammany Hall, Wood first served in Congress in 1841.

Charles Francis Murphy

Charles F. MurphyCharles MurphyCharlie Murphy
Charles Murphy was the quiet, but highly effective boss of Tammany from 1902 to 1924.
Charles Francis "Silent Charlie" Murphy (June 20, 1858 – April 25, 1924), also known as Boss Murphy, was an American political figure, and longest serving Head of New York City's Tammany Hall from 1902–1924.

Jimmy Walker

James J. WalkerJames WalkerMayor Jimmy Walker
In 1932, Mayor Jimmy Walker was forced from office when his bribery was exposed.
A flamboyant politician, he was a liberal Democrat and part of the powerful Tammany Hall machine.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
It typically controlled Democratic Party nominations and political patronage in Manhattan after the mayoral victory of Fernando Wood in 1854, and used its patronage resources to build a loyal, well-rewarded core of district and precinct leaders; after 1850 the great majority were Irish Catholics.
Tammany Hall, a Democratic Party political machine, began to grow in influence with the support of many of the immigrant Irish, culminating in the election of the first Tammany mayor, Fernando Wood, in 1854.

Carmine DeSapio

Carmine De SapioCarmine G. DeSapioCarmine Gerard DeSapio
A brief resurgence in Tammany power in the 1950s under the leadership of Carmine DeSapio was met with Democratic Party opposition led by Eleanor Roosevelt, Herbert Lehman, and the New York Committee for Democratic Voters.
He was the last head of the Tammany Hall political machine to dominate municipal politics.

Tamanend

TammanyTamenundSt. Tammany
The name "Tammany" comes from Tamanend, a Native American leader of the Lenape.
The most famous of these was New York City's Society of St. Tammany, whose members developed an influential political machine known as "Tammany Hall."

Political machine

machine politicsmachinepolitical boss
It was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City and New York State politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s.
One of the most infamous of these political machines was Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party machine that played a major role in controlling New York City and New York politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise up in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s.

Locofocos

LocofocoLoco-FocosLoco-foco
In the 1830s the Loco-Focos, an anti-monopoly and pro-labor faction of the Democratic Party, became Tammany's main rival for votes by appealing to workingmen, however, their political opponent remained the Whigs.
The faction was originally named the Equal Rights Party, and was created in New York City as a protest against that city's regular Democratic organization ("Tammany Hall").

Isaiah Rynders

Isaac Rynders
These gangs included the Dead Rabbits, the Bowery Boys, Mike Walsh's Spartan Association, the Roach Guards, the Plug Uglies, the Wide-Awakes, and Captain Isaiah Rynders' Empire Club.
Captain Isaiah Rynders (1804 – January 3, 1885) was an American businessman, sportsman, underworld figure and political organizer for Tammany Hall.

George W. Plunkitt

George Washington Plunkitthonest graft
In an example of their involvement in the lives of citizens, in the course of one day, Tammany figure George Washington Plunkitt assisted the victims of a house fire; secured the release of six drunks by speaking on their behalf to a judge; paid the rent of a poor family to prevent their eviction and gave them money for food; secured employment for four individuals; attended the funerals of two of his constituents (one Italian, the other Jewish); attended a Bar Mitzvah; and attended the wedding of a Jewish couple from his ward.
He served in both houses of the New York State Legislature and was a member of the Tammany Hall political machine in New York City.

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr, Jr.Aaron Burr Jr.Burr, Aaron
High ranking Democratic-Republican Aaron Burr saw Tammany Hall as an opportunity to counter Alexander Hamilton's Society of the Cincinnati.
Burr quickly became a key player in New York politics, more powerful in time than Hamilton due largely to the power of the Tammany Society (which became Tammany Hall).

History of New York City

New York CityNew AngoulêmeNew York
It was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City and New York State politics and helping immigrants, most notably the Irish, rise in American politics from the 1790s to the 1960s.
This period started with the 1855 inauguration of Fernando Wood as the first mayor from Tammany Hall, an Irish immigrant-supported Democratic Party political machine that dominated local politics throughout this period and into the 1930s.

Ward heeler

ward heelersward-heeler
The Tammany Hall ward boss or ward heeler – wards were the city's smallest political units from 1786 to 1938 – served as the local vote gatherer and provider of patronage.
The term originated during the period of machine politics around the turn of the 20th century, when powerful political machines in major cities run by political bosses, such as the Tammany Hall organization in New York City, used corruption, such as graft and patronage to maintain their power.

Martin Van Buren

Van BurenPresident Martin Van BurenPresident Van Buren
Martin Van Buren and his Albany Regency soon began controlling the policy of Tammany Hall.
The Regency relied on a coalition of small farmers, but also enjoyed support from the Tammany Hall machine in New York City.

Thomas Nast

Thomas Nast AwardNastNast, Thomas
Campaigns to topple Tweed by The New York Times and Thomas Nast of Harper's Weekly began to gain traction in the aftermath of the riot, and disgruntled insiders began to leak the details of the extent and scope of the Tweed Ring's avarice to the newspapers.
He was a critic of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine.

John Pintard

Lewis Pintard
Although Mooney claimed the top role in the early organization, it was a wealthy merchant and philanthropist named John Pintard who created the society's constitution and declared its mission as "[a] political institution founded on a strong republican basis whose democratic principles will serve in some measure to correct the aristocracy of our city."
Pintard drafted the constitution of the Tammany Society, developed the titles of the members, and urged the canonization of Christopher Columbus within the society.

John Ferguson (New York politician)

John Ferguson
In 1815, Tammany Hall grand sachem John Ferguson defeated Dewitt Clinton and was elected mayor.
He was also Grand Sachem of Tammany Hall.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
Specifically, O'Brien forwarded the city's financial accounts to the New York Times.
The newspaper's influence grew in 1870 and 1871, when it published a series of exposés on William Tweed, leader of the city's Democratic Party—popularly known as "Tammany Hall" (from its early-19th-century meeting headquarters)—that led to the end of the Tweed Ring's domination of New York's City Hall.

John Kelly (New York politician)

John KellyHonest John" KellyHonest" John Kelly
Reforms demanded a general housecleaning, and former county sheriff "Honest John" Kelly was selected as the new leader.
John Kelly (April 20, 1822 – June 1, 1886) of New York City, known as "Honest John", was a boss of Tammany Hall and a U.S. Representative from New York from 1855 to 1858.

Richard Croker

Boss" CrokerRichard "Boss" CrokerBoss Croker
Richard Croker, Kelly's right-hand man, had succeeded Kelly as Grand Sachem of Tammany, and he understood that he would also need to make peace with the non-Tammany "Swallowtail" faction of the Democratic Party to avoid the threat that George and the ULP posed, which was the potential re-structuring of the city's politics along class lines and away from the ethnic-based politics which has been Tammany's underpinning all along.
Richard Welstead Croker Sr. (November 24, 1843 – April 29, 1922), known as "Boss Croker," was an American politician who was a leader of New York City's Tammany Hall and a political boss.

Prison Ship Martyrs' Monument

prison shipsPrison Ship Martyrs Monumenta monument
Davis announced that the Society was going to provide proper burials for these soldiers with a monument dedicated to their memory on nearby land owned by a fellow sachem.
The Tammany Society, headed by Benjamin Romaine was created and grew into a Republican organization.

Dead Rabbits

Irish factionThe Dead Rabbits
These gangs included the Dead Rabbits, the Bowery Boys, Mike Walsh's Spartan Association, the Roach Guards, the Plug Uglies, the Wide-Awakes, and Captain Isaiah Rynders' Empire Club.
Besides street-fighting, the Dead Rabbits supported politicians such as Fernando Wood and the Tammany Hall machine, whose platforms included the welfare and benefit of immigrant groups and minorities, and under the leadership of Isaiah Rynders the gang acted as enforcers to violently persuade voters during elections to vote for their candidates.

Edmond-Charles Genêt

Citizen GenetEdmond-Charles GenetCitizen Genêt
The Society assisted the federal government in procuring a peace treaty with the Creek Indians of Georgia and Florida at the request of George Washington in 1790 and also hosted Edmond-Charles Genêt in 1793, representative of the New French Republic after the French Revolution toppled the old regime.
He was also hosted by the Democratic-Republican society, the Tammany Society, in 1793.