Tape recorder

audio tapetape machineaudiotapetapetape decktape recordersmagnetic tape sound recordingtape recordingmagnetic tape recordingtape machines
An audio tape recorder, tape deck, or tape machine is a sound recording and reproduction device that records and plays back sounds usually using magnetic tape for storage.wikipedia
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Magnetic tape

tapetapesanalog tape
An audio tape recorder, tape deck, or tape machine is a sound recording and reproduction device that records and plays back sounds usually using magnetic tape for storage.
Devices that record and play back audio and video using magnetic tape are tape recorders and video tape recorders respectively.

Cassette deck

cassette playercassette recordercassette
Tape-recording devices include the reel-to-reel tape deck and the cassette deck, which uses a cassette for storage.
A cassette deck is a type of tape machine for playing and recording audio cassettes.

Tape head

erase headplayback headhead
In its present-day form, it records a fluctuating signal by moving the tape across a tape head that polarizes the magnetic domains in the tape in proportion to the audio signal.
A tape head is a type of transducer used in tape recorders to convert electrical signals to magnetic fluctuations and vice versa.

Reel-to-reel audio tape recording

reel-to-reelreel-to-reel tapereel to reel
Tape-recording devices include the reel-to-reel tape deck and the cassette deck, which uses a cassette for storage.
The reel-to-reel format was used in the earliest tape recorders, including the pioneering German-British Blattnerphone (1928) machines of the late 1920s which used steel tape, and the German Magnetophon machines of the 1930s.

Analog recording

analoganalogueanalog audio
Since some early refinements improved the fidelity of the reproduced sound, magnetic tape has been the highest quality analog recording medium available.
Later, electronic techniques such as wire recording and tape recorder were developed.

Magnetic storage

magnetic recordingmagnetic mediamagnetic disk
Prior to the development of magnetic tape, magnetic wire recorders had successfully demonstrated the concept of magnetic recording, but they never offered audio quality comparable to the other recording and broadcast standards of the time. Magnetic recording was conceived as early as 1878 by the American engineer Oberlin Smith and demonstrated in practice in 1898 by Danish engineer Valdemar Poulsen.
In 1928, Fritz Pfleumer developed the first magnetic tape recorder.

Wire recording

wire recorderwire recordersmagnetic wire recorder
Prior to the development of magnetic tape, magnetic wire recorders had successfully demonstrated the concept of magnetic recording, but they never offered audio quality comparable to the other recording and broadcast standards of the time.
The earliest magnetic tape recorders, not commercially available in the U.S. until 1948, were too expensive, complicated, and bulky to compete with these consumer-level wire recorders.

Sound recording and reproduction

recordingrecordedrecordings
An audio tape recorder, tape deck, or tape machine is a sound recording and reproduction device that records and plays back sounds usually using magnetic tape for storage.
An important field of invention during this period was the tape recorder.

Ludwig Blattner

BlattnerphoneLouis Blattner
The following year a fellow German, Louis Blattner, working in Britain, licensed Stille's device and started work on a machine which would instead record on a magnetic steel tape, which he called the Blattnerphone.
Ludwig Blattner, also known as Louis Blattner, was a pioneer of early magnetic sound recording, licensing a steel wire-based design from German inventor Dr. Kurt Stille, and enhancing it to use steel tape instead of wire, thereby creating an early form of tape recorder.

Alexander Graham Bell

BellGraham BellAlexander Bell
The earliest known audio tape recorder was a non-magnetic, non-electric version invented by Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory and patented in 1886.
They abandoned the idea, never realizing they had glimpsed a basic principle which would one day find its application in the tape recorder, the hard disc and floppy disc drive, and other magnetic media.

Tape bias

biasAC biasAC biasing
Walter Weber, working for Hans Joachim von Braunmühl at the RRG, discovered the AC biasing technique, which radically improved sound quality.
Tape bias is the term for two techniques, AC bias and DC bias, that improve the fidelity of analogue tape recorders.

Volta Laboratory and Bureau

Volta LaboratoryVolta BureauVolta Laboratory Association
The earliest known audio tape recorder was a non-magnetic, non-electric version invented by Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory and patented in 1886.
The experimental machines built at the Volta Laboratory include both disc and cylinder types, with some of the disc type turntables rotating vertically about a horizontal axis, as well as a hand-powered, non-magnetic tape recorder.

Jack Mullin

John T. MullinJohn T. "Jack" Mullin
American audio engineer John T. Mullin and entertainer Bing Crosby were key players in the commercial development of magnetic tape.
John Thomas Mullin (October 5, 1913 – June 24, 1999) was an American pioneer in the field of magnetic tape sound recording and made significant contributions to many other related fields.

8-track tape

8-track8-track cartridge8 Track
The 8-track tape standard, promoted by Bill Lear in the early 1960s, popularized consumer audio playback in automobiles.
The 8-track tape (formally Stereo 8; commonly known as the eight-track cartridge, eight-track tape, or simply eight-track) is a magnetic tape sound-recording technology that was popular in the United States from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s, when the Compact Cassette format took over.

Valdemar Poulsen

telegraphonePoulsen, Valdemara Danish inventor
Magnetic recording was conceived as early as 1878 by the American engineer Oberlin Smith and demonstrated in practice in 1898 by Danish engineer Valdemar Poulsen.
Magnetic wire recording, and its successor, magnetic tape recording, involve the use of a magnetizable medium which moves past a recording head.

BASF

BASF SEBadische Anilin- und Soda-FabrikBASF Corporation
Magnetic tape recording as we know it today was developed in Germany during the 1930s at BASF (then part of the chemical giant IG Farben) and AEG in cooperation with the state radio RRG.
In 1935, IG Farben and AEG presented the magnetophon – the first tape recorder – at the Radio Exhibition in Berlin.

Sony

Sony CorporationSony ElectronicsSony Corp.
Philips' development of the Compact Cassette in 1963 and Sony's development of the Walkman in 1979 led to widespread consumer use of magnetic audio tape.
The company built Japan's first tape recorder, called the Type-G.

Cassette tape

cassetteCScompact cassette
Tape-recording devices include the reel-to-reel tape deck and the cassette deck, which uses a cassette for storage.

Tape transport

capstanpinch rollercapstans
One motor with a constant rotational speed drives the capstan.
A tape transport is the collection of parts of a magnetic tape player or recorder that the actual tape passes through.

Brian Eno

Eno[Brian] EnoThe Microsoft Sound
Multitrack technology enabled the development of modern art music and one such artist, Brian Eno, described the tape recorder as "an automatic musical collage device".
Whilst at school, Eno used a tape recorder as a musical instrument and experimented with his first, sometimes improvisational, bands.

Bing Crosby

Bing Crosby ProductionsCrosbyBing
American audio engineer John T. Mullin and entertainer Bing Crosby were key players in the commercial development of magnetic tape.
Crosby's insistence eventually factored into the further development of magnetic tape sound recording and the radio industry's widespread adoption of it.

Endless tape cartridge

endless loopendless loop tape cartridgeendless-loop
Innovations, like multitrack recording and tape echo, enabled radio programs and advertisements to be pre-produced to a level of complexity and sophistication that was previously unattainable and tape also led to significant changes to the pacing of program content, thanks to the introduction of the endless-loop tape cartridge.
An endless tape cartridge is a tape cartridge or cassette that contains magnetic audio tape that can be played in an endless loop, without the need to rewind to repeat.

Fritz Pfleumer

This was based on Fritz Pfleumer's 1928 invention of paper tape with oxide powder lacquered to it.
On 1 December 1932 Pfleumer granted AEG the right to use his invention when building the world's first practical tape recorder, called Magnetophon K1.

Richard H. Ranger

Richard Howland RangerRichard RangerRanger, Richard H.
Analysts such as Richard H. Ranger believed that the broadcasts had to be transcriptions, but their audio quality was indistinguishable from that of a live broadcast and their duration was far longer than was possible even with 16 rpm transcription discs.
After the war, Ranger's work led to further development of magnetic tape recorders.