A report on Xinjiang and Tarim Basin

The Tarim Basin is the oval-shaped desert in Central Asia.
Dzungaria (Red) and the Tarim Basin or Altishahr (Blue)
Physical map showing the separation of Dzungaria and the Tarim Basin (Taklamakan) by the Tien Shan Mountains
Northern Xinjiang (Junggar Basin) (Yellow), Eastern Xinjiang- Turpan Depression (Turpan Prefecture and Hami Prefecture) (Red) and Altishahr/the Tarim Basin (Blue)
Tarim basin ancient boats; they were used for burials
Physical map showing the separation of Dzungaria and the Tarim Basin (Altishahr) by the Tien Shan Mountains
NASA landsat photo of the Tarim Basin
Map of Han Dynasty in 2 CE. Light blue is the Tarim Basin protectorate.
The Tarim Basin, 2008
Old Uyghur/Yugur art from the Bezeklik murals
Tarim Basin in the 3rd century
The Tarim Basin in the 3rd century AD
Tarim mummies, found in westernmost Xinjiang, within the Tarim Basin.
A Sogdian man on a Bactrian camel. Sancai ceramic statuette, Tang dynasty
Fragmentary painting on silk of a woman playing the go boardgame, from the Astana Cemetery, Gaochang, c. 744 AD, during the late period of Tang Chinese rule (just before the An Lushan Rebellion)
Mongol states from the 14th to the 17th centuries: the Northern Yuan dynasty, Four Oirat, Moghulistan and Kara Del
Map of Taizong's campaigns against the Tarim Basin oasis states, allies of the Western Turks.
The Dzungar–Qing Wars, between the Qing Dynasty and the Dzungar Khanate
A document from Khotan written in Khotanese Saka, part of the Eastern Iranian branch of the Indo-European languages, listing the animals of the Chinese zodiac in the cycle of predictions for people born in that year; ink on paper, early 9th century
The Battle of Oroi-Jalatu in 1756, between the Manchu and Oirat armies
Uyghur princes from the Bezeklik Thousand Buddha Caves near Turpan, Kingdom of Qocho, 8th-9th centuries
The Qing Empire ca. 1820
An Islamic cemetery outside the Afaq Khoja Mausoleum in Kashgar
Scene from the 1828 Qing campaign against rebels in Altishahr
Subashi Buddhist temple ruins
Yakub Beg, ruler of Yettishar
Northern Xinjiang (Dzungar Basin) (yellow), Eastern Xinjiang - Turpan Depression (Turpan Prefecture and Hami Prefecture) (red), and the Tarim Basin (blue)
19th-century Khotan Uyghurs in Yettishar
Uyghurs in Khotan
Kuomintang in Xinjiang, 1942
Fresco, with Hellenistic influences, from a stupa shrine, Miran
Governor Sheng Shicai ruled from 1933 to 1944.
Painting of a Christian woman, Khocho (Gaochang), early period of Chinese Tang rule, 602–654 AD
The Soviet-backed Second East Turkestan Republic encompassed Xinjiang's Ili, Tarbagatay and Altay districts.
Close to Karakoram Highway in Xinjiang.
Pamir Mountains and Muztagh Ata.
Taklamakan Desert
Tianchi Lake
Black Irtysh river in Burqin County is a famous spot for sightseeing.
Kanas Lake
Largest cities and towns of Xinjiang
Statue of Mao Zedong in Kashgar
Nur Bekri, Chairman of the Xinjiang Government between 2007 and 2015
The distribution map of Xinjiang's GDP per person (2011)
Ürümqi is a major industrial center within Xinjiang.
Wind farm in Xinjiang
Sunday market in Khotan
Ürümqi Diwopu International Airport
Karakorum highway
This flag (Kök Bayraq) has become a symbol of the East Turkestan independence movement.
"Heroic Gesture of Bodhisattvathe Bodhisattva", example of 6th-7th-century terracotta Greco-Buddhist art (local populations were Buddhist) from Tumxuk, Xinjiang
Sogdian donors to the Buddha, 8th century fresco (with detail), Bezeklik, Eastern Tarim Basin
A mosque in Ürümqi
People engaging in snow sports by a statue of bodhisattva Guanyin in Wujiaqu
Christian Church in Hami
Catholic Church in Urumqi
Temple of the Great Buddha in Midong, Ürümqi
Taoist Temple of Fortune and Longevity at the Heavenly Lake of Tianshan in Fukang, Changji Hui Autonomous Prefecture
Emin Minaret
Id Kah mosque in Kashgar, largest mosque in China
Erkin Tuniyaz, the incumbent Chairman of the Xinjiang Government

Located in China's Xinjiang region, it is sometimes used synonymously to refer to the southern half of the province, or Nanjiang, as opposed to the northern half of the province known as Dzungaria or Beijiang.

- Tarim Basin

Xinjiang is divided into the Dzungarian Basin in the north and the Tarim Basin in the south by a mountain range, and only about 9.7% of Xinjiang's land area is fit for human habitation.

- Xinjiang

50 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Map of the Hexi Corridor

Hexi Corridor

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Important historical region located in the modern western Gansu province of China.

Important historical region located in the modern western Gansu province of China.

Map of the Hexi Corridor
Mural commemorating victory of General Zhang Yichao over the Tibetan Empire in 848. Mogao cave 156, late Chinese Tang Dynasty
Tang-era map showing the Hexi Corridor connecting China proper to the Tarim Basin
The ruins of a Han Dynasty watchtower made of rammed earth at Dunhuang.

At the western end, the route splits into three, going either north of the Tianshan Mountains or south on either side of the Tarim Basin.

It was during this rebellion that the Tang withdrew its western garrisons stationed in what is now Gansu and Qinghai, which the Tibetans then occupied along with the area that is modern Xinjiang.

Endorheic basin showing waterflow input into Üüreg Lake, Mongolia

Endorheic basin

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Drainage basin that normally retains water and allows no outflow to other external bodies of water, such as rivers or oceans, but drainage converges instead into lakes or swamps, permanent or seasonal, that equilibrate through evaporation.

Drainage basin that normally retains water and allows no outflow to other external bodies of water, such as rivers or oceans, but drainage converges instead into lakes or swamps, permanent or seasonal, that equilibrate through evaporation.

Endorheic basin showing waterflow input into Üüreg Lake, Mongolia
NASA photo of the endorheic Tarim Basin, China
The Okavango Delta (centre) of southern Africa, where the Okavango River spills out into the empty trough of the Kalahari Desert. The area was a lake fed by the river during the Ice Ages (national borders are superimposed)
Major endorheic basins of the world. Basins are shown in dark gray; major endorheic lakes are shown in black. Coloured regions represent the major drainage patterns of the continents to the oceans (non-endorheic). Continental divides are indicated by dark lines.
The Caspian Sea, a large inland basin
Lake Van, Turkey
A false-colour satellite photo of Australia's Lake Eyre Image credit: NASA's Earth Observatory
The Lasithi Plateau in Crete
MODIS image from November 4, 2001 showing Lake Titicaca, the Salar de Uyuni, and the Salar de Coipasa. These are all parts of the Altiplano
The dry lake in the Badwater Basin in Death Valley National Park
Great Salt Lake, Satellite photo (2003) after five years of drought

Lop Lake, in the Tarim Basin of China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

A map of the campaigns against the oasis states of the Tarim Basin, including the defeat of Kucha

Tang campaign against Kucha

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A map of the campaigns against the oasis states of the Tarim Basin, including the defeat of Kucha
King Suvarnapuspa of Kucha (ruled 600-625 CE), Cave 69, Kizil Caves.
Emperor Taizong launched military campaigns against the oasis states of the Tarim Basin
Chinese officer of the Guard of Honour. Tomb of Princess Chang-le (長樂公主墓), Zhao Mausoleum, Shaanxi province. Tang Zhenguan year 17, i.e. 644 CE
Bust of a bodhisattva from Kucha, 6th–7th century

The Tang campaign against Kucha was a military campaign led by the Tang dynasty general Ashina She'er against the Tarim Basin oasis state of Kucha in Xinjiang, which was aligned with the Western Turkic Khaganate.

Tang Dynasty's conquest of Western Turks (Tujue) Khanate

Tang campaigns against the Western Turks

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The Tang campaigns against the Western Turks, known as the Western Tujue in Chinese sources, were a series of military campaigns conducted by the Tang dynasty against the Western Turkic Khaganate in the 7th century AD. Early military conflicts were a result of the Tang interventions in the rivalry between the Western and Eastern Turks in order to weaken both.

The Tang campaigns against the Western Turks, known as the Western Tujue in Chinese sources, were a series of military campaigns conducted by the Tang dynasty against the Western Turkic Khaganate in the 7th century AD. Early military conflicts were a result of the Tang interventions in the rivalry between the Western and Eastern Turks in order to weaken both.

Tang Dynasty's conquest of Western Turks (Tujue) Khanate
Tang emissaries to King Varkhuman in Samarkand, 648–651 CE, Afrasiab murals
Chinese officer of the Guard of Honour. Tomb of Princess Changle (长乐公主墓), Zhao Mausoleum, Shaanxi province. Tang Zhenguan year 17, ie 644 CE
Turkish officers during a audience with king Varkhuman of Samarkand. 648–651 CE, Afrasiyab murals, Samarkand. They are recognizable by their long plaits.

The Western Turks attempted to capture the Tarim Basin in 670 and 677, but were repelled by the Tang.

Indo-European prevalence in Central Asia declined as the expeditions accelerated Turkic migration into what is now Xinjiang.

Kargilik Town

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Bazaar of Kargilik

Kargilik or Karghalik or Yecheng in Chinese, is a town in Xinjiang, China.

It is situated on the southern rim of the Taklamakan desert, about halfway between Pishan and Yarkand on the southern route around the Tarim Basin.

Greatest extent of the Western Turkic Khaganate after the Battle of Bukhara (brown), and their southern expansion as the Tokhara Yabghus and Turk Shahis (ochre)

Western Turkic Khaganate

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Turkic khaganate in Eurasia, formed as a result of the wars in the beginning of the 7th century after the split of the Turkic Khaganate (founded in the 6th century on the Mongolian Plateau by the Ashina clan) into a western and an eastern Khaganate.

Turkic khaganate in Eurasia, formed as a result of the wars in the beginning of the 7th century after the split of the Turkic Khaganate (founded in the 6th century on the Mongolian Plateau by the Ashina clan) into a western and an eastern Khaganate.

Greatest extent of the Western Turkic Khaganate after the Battle of Bukhara (brown), and their southern expansion as the Tokhara Yabghus and Turk Shahis (ochre)
Western Turk officer attending the reception of ambassadors by king Varkhuman of Samarkand. Afrasiab murals, 7th century CE. The Turks had a Mongoloid appearance.
An early Turk Shahi ruler named Sri Ranasrikari "The Lord who brings excellence through war" (Brahmi script). In this realistic portrait, he wears the Turkic double-lapel caftan. Late 7th to early 8th century CE.
Map of the six major protectorates during Tang dynasty.
Turkic officers during a audience with king Varkhuman of Samarkand. 648-651 CE, Afrasiyab murals, Samarkand. They are recognizable by their long plaits.
A Turkic nobleman with long plaited hair, from Tashkent. Coin of the Turkic dynasties of Chach. Circa 605-630 CE.
Tang dynasty military campaigns against the Western Turks
Federal symbol of the Western Turks circa 650 CE. Eleven poles symbolizing the five Dulu tribes, the five Nushibi tribes, with the central pole symbolizing the rulership of a Yabghu-Qaghan. Afrasiab murals.
Western Turk attendants and officers, all recognizable by their long plaits, at the court of Samarkand. Afrasiab murals, 7th century CE.
Seated Turkic attendants, at the court of Samarkand. Afrasiab murals, 7th century CE.
A Turk (center) mourning the Buddha, Maya Cave (Cave 224), Kizil Caves. He is cutting his forehead with a knife, a practice of self-mutilation also known among the Scythians.

At this time the Hephthalites held the Tarim Basin, Fergana, Sogdia, Bactria and Merv, with the Persians at approximately their present border.

Indo-European prevalence in Central Asia declined as the expeditions accelerated Turkic migration into what is now Xinjiang.

Kashgar Prefecture

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Map including Kashgar (1917)
Map including Kashgar and surrounding region from the International Map of the World (AMS, 1966){{efn|From map: "DELINEATION OF INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARIES MUST NOT BE CONSIDERED AUTHORITATIVE"}}
From the Operational Navigation Chart; map including Kashgar Prefecture area (DMA, 1980){{efn|From map: "The representation of international boundaries is not necessarily authoritative."}}
Map including Kashgar Prefecture area (northwest) (DMA, 1984){{efn|From map: "The representation of international boundaries is not necessarily authoritative"}}
"Territory ceded by Pakistan to China in 1963 and never recognized by India" (Trans-Karakoram Tract in southern Kashgar Prefecture)

Kashgar Prefecture, also known as Kashi Prefecture, is located in southwestern Xinjiang, China, located in the Tarim Basin region (roughly the southern half of Xinjiang).

Montgomerie's original sketch from 1856 in which he applied the notation K2

K2

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Second-highest mountain on Earth, after Mount Everest .

Second-highest mountain on Earth, after Mount Everest .

Montgomerie's original sketch from 1856 in which he applied the notation K2
Map including K2 (labelled as K2 (MOUNT GODWIN AUSTEN) in upper left corner of map) (, 1953)
The west face of K2 taken from the Savoia Glacier, on the 1909 expedition
K2 from the east, photographed during the 1909 expedition
Achille Compagnoni on K2's summit on the first ascent (31 July 1954)
The south side of K2 with the Abruzzi Spur route.
The north side of K2. The North Ridge is in the centre of the picture.
The routes climbed on the Northwest of the mountain. A: West Ridge; B: West Face; C: Northwest Ridge; D: North Ridge; E: Northeast Ridge

It lies in the Karakoram range, partially in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan-administered Kashmir and partially in a China-administered territory of the Kashmir region included in the Taxkorgan Tajik Autonomous County of Xinjiang.

The Tarim sedimentary basin borders the range on the north and the Lesser Himalayas on the south.

Qäwrighul culture

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The Qäwrighul culture is a late Bronze Age culture which flourished along the Kongque River in Xinjiang from ca. 2100 BC to 1500 BC.

These are the earliest evidence for the presence of Europoid populations in the Tarim Basin.

Artux

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Shipton's Arch
Map including Artux A-t'u-shih (DMA, 1983)
Map including Artux (labeled as A-T'U-SHIH (ARTUSH)) (AMS, 1966){{efn|From map: "DELINEATION OF INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARIES MUST NOT BE CONSIDERED AUTHORITATIVE"}}
From the Operational Navigation Chart; map including Artux (A-t'u-shih) (DMA, 1980){{efn|From map: "The representation of international boundaries is not necessarily authoritative."}}
Map including Artux (A-t'u-shih) (DMA, 1984){{efn|From map: "The representation of international boundaries is not necessarily authoritative"}}

Artux, Artush (ئاتۇش شەھىرى; ارتىش, Артыш, Artysh), and officially rendered as Atush, is a county-level city and the capital of the Kyrgyz autonomous prefecture of Kizilsu in Xinjiang, China.

It is situated in the northwest part of the Tarim Basin, south of the Tien Shan mountains.