Tarnopol Voivodeship

TarnopoltarnopolskieTarnopol Voivodshipprovincial capital of Tarnopol
Tarnopol Voivodeship (Województwo tarnopolskie) was an administrative region of interwar Poland (1918–1939), created on 23 December 1920, with an area of 16,500 km² and provincial capital in Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine).wikipedia
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Ternopil

TarnopolTernopolTarnopil
Tarnopol Voivodeship (Województwo tarnopolskie) was an administrative region of interwar Poland (1918–1939), created on 23 December 1920, with an area of 16,500 km² and provincial capital in Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine).
From 1922 to September 1939, Tarnopol served as the capital of the Tarnopol Voivodeship that consisted of 17 powiats.

Tarnopol Ghetto

TarnopolTernopil (Tarnopol)
In September 1941, the German occupation authorities established Jewish ghettos in a number of towns including the Tarnopol Ghetto with 12,000–13,000 prisoners.
The Tarnopol Ghetto (getto w Tarnopolu, Ghetto Tarnopol) was a Jewish World War II ghetto established in 1941 by the Schutzstaffel (SS) in the prewar Polish city of Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine).

Voivodeships of Poland

VoivodeshipvoivodeshipsProvince
The voivodeship was divided into 17 districts (powiaty).

Second Polish Republic

PolandPolishinterwar Poland
Tarnopol Voivodeship (Województwo tarnopolskie) was an administrative region of interwar Poland (1918–1939), created on 23 December 1920, with an area of 16,500 km² and provincial capital in Tarnopol (now Ternopil, Ukraine).

Ternopil Oblast

TernopilTernopil regionTarnopil Oblast
Since 1991, most of the region is located in the Ternopil Oblast in sovereign Ukraine.
In historical comparison, before World War II national composition was very different and according to the 1931 Polish Census Ukrainians were a slight majority in the Tarnopol Voivodeship at 54.8%, while there was almost no Russians.

Lwów Voivodeship

Lwow VoivodeshipLwówLviv Voivodeship
It was located in south-eastern corner of Poland, bordering Soviet Union to the east, Lwów Voivodeship and Stanisławów Voivodeship to the west, Romania to the south and Volhynian Voivodeship to the north.
It was located in southern Poland, bordering Czechoslovakia to the south, Kraków Voivodeship to the west, Lublin Voivodeship to the north and Volhynian Voivodeship, Stanisławów Voivodeship and Tarnopol Voivodeship to the east.

Stanisławów Voivodeship

Stanislawow VoivodeshipStanisławówStanisławów Voivodship
It was located in south-eastern corner of Poland, bordering Soviet Union to the east, Lwów Voivodeship and Stanisławów Voivodeship to the west, Romania to the south and Volhynian Voivodeship to the north.
It was located in south-eastern corner of the country, bordering Tarnopol Voivodeship to the northeast, Lwów Voivodeship to the west, Czechoslovakia (Between 1919–1938), Hungary (Between 1938–1939) and Romania to the south.

Kamianka-Buzka

Kamionka StrumilowaKamionka StrumiłowaKamyanka-Buzka
From 1918 to 1939 it was part of Poland, and called Kamionka Strumiłowa, was the capital of a county of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Wołyń Voivodeship (1921–1939)

Wołyń VoivodeshipVolhynian VoivodeshipWołyń Voivodeship (1921–39)
It was located in south-eastern corner of Poland, bordering Soviet Union to the east, Lwów Voivodeship and Stanisławów Voivodeship to the west, Romania to the south and Volhynian Voivodeship to the north.
The Wołyń voivodeship was located at the south-eastern corner of Poland, bordering the Soviet Union to the east, the Lublin Voivodeship to the west, the Polesie Voivodeship to the north, and the Lwów and Tarnopol Voivodeships to the south.

Zolochiv

ZłoczówZloczowZlotshev
16,400), Złoczów (pop.
From 15 March 1923 until the Invasion of Poland in 1939, when the town was occupied by the Soviet Union, Zolochiv, still named Złoczów, belonged to the Tarnopol Voivodship of the second Polish Republic.

Chortkiv

CzortkówCzortkowChortkov
Other important municipal centers of the voivodeship were: Czortków (pop.
It was ceded to sovereign Poland in the Peace Treaty of Riga between Poland, Soviet Russia (acting also on behalf of Soviet Belarus) and Soviet Ukraine, and remained part of the Tarnopol Voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic until the Soviet invasion of Poland in September 1939.

Terebovlia

TrembowlaTerebovlyaTerebovl
Until September 17, 1939, the day of the Soviet invasion of Poland, Trembowla was a county seat within the Tarnopol Voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic.

Kresy

Eastern PolandEastern BorderlandsKresy Wschodnie
* Kresy Borderlands
Administratively, the Kresy territory was composed of Lwów, Nowogródek, Polesie, Stanisławów, Tarnopol, Wilno, Wołyń, and Białystok voivodeships (provinces).

Brody

Brodcity of Brody
19,000), Brody (pop.
Administratively Brody was the seat of the Brody County located in the Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Buchach

Buczacz
12,000) and Buczacz (pop.
In the Second Polish Republic, Buchach was the seat of a county (powiat) in Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Peremyshliany

PeremyshlyanyPrzemyslanyPrzemyślany
In the Second Polish Republic, it was the seat of a county in Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Podolia

PodilliaPodolePodilia
The landscape was hilly, with the Podole upland covering large part of the Voivodeship.
In Poland from 1921 to 1939, western Podolia was part of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Borshchiv

BorschivBorszczówBorszczow
In the Second Polish Republic, Borszczow was the seat of a county (powiat) in Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Okopy, Ternopil Oblast

Okopy Świętej TrójcyOkopyOkopy Swietej Trojcy
The south-easternmost place was the famous Polish stronghold Okopy Swietej Trojcy (Ramparts of the Hole Trinity), which for some time was protecting Poland from the invasions of the Turks and the Tartars.
After the Polish-Bolshevik War of 1920, the site was made part of Poland, in the Tarnopol Voivodship, near the Polish border with the Soviet Union and Romania.

Zalishchyky

ZaleszczykiZalischykyZaleshchitskaya
The southern part of the voivodship was popular among tourists, with the main center in Zaleszczyki – a border-town, located on the Dniestr, where one could spot grapevines, unique to this part of Poland.
Zalishchyky became part of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Zbarazh

ZbarażZbarazZbarazh War
After the conflict, Zbarazh returned to Poland, becoming the seat of a county in Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Kopychyntsi

KopczynceKopychentsiKopychintsy
It was made a seat of a separate powiat within Tarnopol Voivodeship and a garrison town of a Border Protection Corps battalion Kopyczyńce.

Skalat

Skałat
In 1923 Skalat became the seat of a county in the Tarnopol Voivodeship.

Alfred Biłyk

A close associate of Rydz-Śmigły, Biłyk took advantage of the relationship, and was nominated to the post of Voivode of Tarnopol Voivodeship (15 July 1936).

Zboriv

ZborówZborovZborow
After the Polish-Ukrainian war 1918-1919, it became part of Poland and was the seat of a powiat of the Tarnopol Voivodeship.