Tarsus (eyelids)

tarsiSuperior tarsustarsal platesuperior tarsal platetarsaltarsustarsal platesinferior tarsustarsal border
The tarsi (tarsal plates) are two comparatively thick, elongated plates of dense connective tissue, about 2.5 cm in length; one is found in each eyelid, and contributes to its form and support.wikipedia
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Eyelid

eyelidspalpebralpalpebra
The tarsi (tarsal plates) are two comparatively thick, elongated plates of dense connective tissue, about 2.5 cm in length; one is found in each eyelid, and contributes to its form and support.
The eyelid is made up of several layers; from superficial to deep, these are: skin, subcutaneous tissue, orbicularis oculi, orbital septum and tarsal plates, and palpebral conjunctiva.

Superior tarsal muscle

superior tarsalMüller muscleMüller's muscle
It is adjoined by the superior tarsal muscle.
The superior tarsal muscle originates on the underside of levator palpebrae superioris and inserts on the superior tarsal plate of the eyelid.

Levator palpebrae superioris muscle

levator palpebrae superiorislevator palpebraelevator
To the anterior surface of this plate the aponeurosis of the levator palpebræ superioris is attached.
This portion inserts on the skin of the upper eyelid, as well as the superior tarsal plate.

Orbital septum

septum
The attached or orbital margins are connected to the circumference of the orbit by the orbital septum.
In the upper eyelid, the orbital septum blends with the tendon of the levator palpebrae superioris, and in the lower eyelid with the tarsal plate.

Meibomian gland

meibomian glandsmeibomian gland dysfunctiontarsal glands
Along the inner margin of the tarsus are modified sebaceous glands known as tarsal glands (or meibomian glands), aligned vertically within the tarsi: 30 to 40 glands in the upper lid, and 20 to 30 in the lower lid, which secrete a lipid-rich product which helps keep the lacrimal secretions or tears from evaporating too quickly, thus keeping the eye moist.
The Meibomian gland (often written with a small "m" and also called tarsal gland) is a holocrine type of exocrine gland, at the rim of the eyelid inside the tarsal plate, responsible for the supply of meibum, an oily substance that prevents evaporation of the eye's tear film.

Lateral palpebral raphe

lateral palpebral raphé
The lateral angles are attached to the zygomatic bone by the lateral palpebral raphé.
It is attached to the margin of the frontosphenoidal process of the zygomatic bone, and passes medialward to the lateral commissure of the eyelids, where it divides into two slips, which are attached to the margins of the respective tarsi.

Medial palpebral ligament

medial
The medial angles of the two plates end at the lacrimal lake, and are attached to the frontal process of the maxilla by the medial palpebral ligament).
Laterally, it is attached to the tarsus of the upper and lower eyelids.

List of glands of the human body

* List of specialized glands within the human integumentary system

Dense connective tissue

densedense fibrous connective tissue
The tarsi (tarsal plates) are two comparatively thick, elongated plates of dense connective tissue, about 2.5 cm in length; one is found in each eyelid, and contributes to its form and support.

Semilunar

The superior tarsus (tarsus superior; superior tarsal plate), the larger, is of a semilunar form, about 10 mm in breadth at the center, and gradually narrowing toward its extremities.

Zygomatic bone

cheekbonezygomaticcheek bone
The lateral angles are attached to the zygomatic bone by the lateral palpebral raphé.

Lacrimal lake

lacus lacrimalis
The medial angles of the two plates end at the lacrimal lake, and are attached to the frontal process of the maxilla by the medial palpebral ligament).

Maxilla

upper jawmaxillaemaxillary bone
The medial angles of the two plates end at the lacrimal lake, and are attached to the frontal process of the maxilla by the medial palpebral ligament).

Sulcus subtarsalis

The sulcus subtarsalis is a groove in the inner surface of each eyelid.

Tarsus

Tarsus (eyelids), elongated plate of dense connective tissue in each eyelid

Trigonopterus delapan

General coloration is black, with rust-colored tarsi and antennae.

Conjunctivitis

pink eyepinkeyeblepharoconjunctivitis
Viral conjunctivitis manifests as a fine, diffuse pinkness of the conjunctiva, which is easily mistaken for a ciliary infection of the iris (iritis), but corroborative signs on microscopy, particularly numerous lymphoid follicles on the tarsal conjunctiva, and sometimes a punctate keratitis are seen.

Ciaccio's glands

lachrymal caruncle
They are located in the upper border of the tarsus, approximately in the middle between the extremities of the tarsal glands.

Medial palpebral arteries

inferior palpebral arterysuperior palpebralsuperior palpebral artery
They leave the orbit to encircle the eyelids near their free margins, forming a superior and an inferior arch, which lie between the orbicularis oculi and the tarsi.

Trigonopterus costipennis

General coloration is black, with rust-colored tarsi and antennae.

Trigonopterus binodulus

General coloration is black, with rust-colored tarsi and antennae.

South Georgia diving petrel

South GeorgiaSouth Georgia diving-petrel
The legs are blue with posterior black lines down the tarsi.

Sebaceous gland

sebumsebaceous glandssebaceous
They attach directly to the follicles of the eyelashes, which are arranged vertically within the tarsal plates of the eyelids.