A report on Tehuelche people

Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.
The approximate distribution of languages in the southernmost regions of South America during the years of the Spanish conquest.
Tehuelche chiefs, located in Santa Cruz Province in the south of Argentina.
Grupo de patagones en puerto Peckett. An 1832 drawing made during the voyage of Jules Dumont d'Urville.
Distribution of pre-Hispanic peoples in Southern Patagonia
Tehuelche Cloak. Museo de La Plata.
The classification of Chonan languages, according to Roberto Lehmann-Nitsche.
Rock art at Cueva de las Manos, Santa Cruz Province.
Portrait of Chief Junchar by José del Pozo in Puerto Deseado, in 1789, during the Malaspina Expedition (1789–1794).
Tehuelches in Río Gallegos.
Under General Roca, the Conquest of the Desert extended Argentine power into Patagonia
Elderly Tehuelche woman smoking a tobacco pipe.
Rosa Chiquichano, of Tehuelche descent. A past member of the Argentine Chamber of Deputies, representing the Chubut Province.
The Tehuelche flag: The blue of the sea, the brown of the mountains, the black arrow pointing north and the Southern Cross.

Indigenous people from Patagonia in South America, with existing members of the group currently residing in the southern Argentina-Chile borders.

- Tehuelche people
Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.

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Río Negro Province

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Province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia.

Province of Argentina, located at the northern edge of Patagonia.

Francisco Moreno
Río Negro, the "black river" and the province's namesake.
Roadside scenery along the Upper Valley of the Rio Negro ("Black River").
Governor Arabella Carreras
Hotel Llao Llao, on Lake Nahuel Huapi. Tourism adds at least 10% to Rio Negro's economy.
Lake Nahuel Huapi, the most famous among the Andes range's many lakes.
Las Grutas beach
Political division of the northern Patagonia; capital cities and heads of departments labeled, national roads and main rivers.
View of Lake Nahuel Huapi and the city of Bariloche.

The province is home to four indigenous groups: The Tehuelches, the Puelches, the Pehuenches, and the Mapuches.

Gualichu

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Gualichu, or gualicho, in Mapuche mythology and mainly in the Tehuelche culture, was an evil spirit or demon, comparable but not similar to the Devil.

Chief Inacayal

Inacayal

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Chief Inacayal

Inacayal (1835-1888) was a cacique (chief) of the Tehuelche people in Patagonia, Argentina who led a resistance against government.

Hands, stenciled at the Cave of the Hands

Cueva de las Manos

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Cave and complex of rock art sites in the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, 163 km south of the town of Perito Moreno.

Cave and complex of rock art sites in the province of Santa Cruz, Argentina, 163 km south of the town of Perito Moreno.

Hands, stenciled at the Cave of the Hands
Pinturas Canyon, view from the caves
Entrance to Cueva de las Manos
The entrance of the cave
Paintings of a humanoid, guanacos, hands, and concentric circles
Dynamic, black guanacos in running motion, typical of style A2
Tourists visiting the cave

The site was last inhabited around 700 AD, with the final cave dwellers possibly being ancestors of the Tehuelche tribes.

Chieftain Cangapol in a portrait by Thomas Falkner.

Cangapol

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Chieftain Cangapol in a portrait by Thomas Falkner.

Cangapol was a Tehuelche cacique born in the area of Huilin, on the Negro River in today's Argentina from 1735 to 1753.

Teushen

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Indigenous hunter-gatherer people of Patagonia in Argentina.

Indigenous hunter-gatherer people of Patagonia in Argentina.

Their territory was between the Tehuelche people to the south and the Puelche people to their north.

George Chaworth Musters

George Chaworth Musters

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British Royal Navy commander and traveller, known as the "King of Patagonia".

British Royal Navy commander and traveller, known as the "King of Patagonia".

George Chaworth Musters
Wáki killing a Puma, illustration from At Home with the Patagonians by George Chaworth Musters

Musters lived on good terms with the indigenous Tehuelche people, travelling with one group from the Magellan Straits to the Río Negro, and then traversing the northern part of Patagonia from east to west, a distance of 1400 miles.

Flag of the Gününa künä, or Puelche people

Puelche people

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The Gününa küna, or sometimes, Puelche (Mapudungun: pwelche, "people of the east") are indigenous peoples living east of the Andes Mountains in Chile and Southwest Argentina.

The Gününa küna, or sometimes, Puelche (Mapudungun: pwelche, "people of the east") are indigenous peoples living east of the Andes Mountains in Chile and Southwest Argentina.

Flag of the Gününa künä, or Puelche people

They were annihilated by plagues and epidemics in the late 18th century, with survivors merging into other groups such as the Mapuche, Het, and Tehuelche.

Modern-day portrait of María la Grande

María la Grande

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María (c.

María (c.

Modern-day portrait of María la Grande

1789 – c. 1841–47), better known as María la Grande or María Grande (English: María the Great), is the Christian name of a woman who served as the cacica of the southern Tehuelche people who lived in the Strait of Magellan and the Patagonian coast during the first half of the 19th century.

Querandí

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The Querandí were one of the Het peoples, indigenous South Americans who lived in the Pampas area of Argentina; specifically, they were the eastern Didiuhet.

The Querandí were one of the Het peoples, indigenous South Americans who lived in the Pampas area of Argentina; specifically, they were the eastern Didiuhet.

When he saw that there was no such connection, he continued navigating southwards along the land presently called Patagonia, making contact with the Tehuelche peoples, whom he called Patagones.