A report on Tehuelche people

Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.
The approximate distribution of languages in the southernmost regions of South America during the years of the Spanish conquest.
Tehuelche chiefs, located in Santa Cruz Province in the south of Argentina.
Grupo de patagones en puerto Peckett. An 1832 drawing made during the voyage of Jules Dumont d'Urville.
Distribution of pre-Hispanic peoples in Southern Patagonia
Tehuelche Cloak. Museo de La Plata.
The classification of Chonan languages, according to Roberto Lehmann-Nitsche.
Rock art at Cueva de las Manos, Santa Cruz Province.
Portrait of Chief Junchar by José del Pozo in Puerto Deseado, in 1789, during the Malaspina Expedition (1789–1794).
Tehuelches in Río Gallegos.
Under General Roca, the Conquest of the Desert extended Argentine power into Patagonia
Elderly Tehuelche woman smoking a tobacco pipe.
Rosa Chiquichano, of Tehuelche descent. A past member of the Argentine Chamber of Deputies, representing the Chubut Province.
The Tehuelche flag: The blue of the sea, the brown of the mountains, the black arrow pointing north and the Southern Cross.

Indigenous people from Patagonia in South America, with existing members of the group currently residing in the southern Argentina-Chile borders.

- Tehuelche people
Mulato, a Tehuelche Chief.

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Salpul

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Salpul (also called Salpu and Juan Salpú) was a northern, or guennekenk, Tehuelche leader in the late 19th century in Patagonia, Argentina.

Robert Lehmann-Nitsche

Robert Lehmann-Nitsche

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German anthropologist who spent thirty years in Argentina as director of the Anthropological Section of the La Plata Museum and professor at the University of Buenos Aires.

German anthropologist who spent thirty years in Argentina as director of the Anthropological Section of the La Plata Museum and professor at the University of Buenos Aires.

Robert Lehmann-Nitsche

In 1905, Lehmann-Nitsche recorded extensively music from the Tehuelche people, but he went on in the following years recording several dozens of Argentinian folk singers specialized in Tango.

Ranquel

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Indigenous tribe from the northern part of La Pampa Province, Argentina, in South America.

Indigenous tribe from the northern part of La Pampa Province, Argentina, in South America.

They were hunters, nomads and during a good part of the 19th century they had an alliance with the Tehuelche people, with whom they traveled east into the western part of today's Buenos Aires Province and southern end of Córdoba Province, and also to Mendoza, San Luis and Santa Fe.

Neuquén

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Capital city of the Argentine province of Neuquén and of the Confluencia Department, located in the east of the province.

Capital city of the Argentine province of Neuquén and of the Confluencia Department, located in the east of the province.

Estadio Ruca Che.

Shortly after the Conquest of the Desert campaign conducted by the military over Patagonia, the Tehuelche and Pehuenche tribes that inhabited the province of Neuquén were either killed or pushed out of these lands.

1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville

Patagon

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The Patagones or Patagonian giants were a race of giant humans rumoured to be living in Patagonia and described in early European accounts.

The Patagones or Patagonian giants were a race of giant humans rumoured to be living in Patagonia and described in early European accounts.

1840s (fanciful) illustration of a Patagon chief from near the Strait of Magellan, bedecked in costume of war; from Voyage au pole sud et dans l'Oceanie... by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville
1840s illustration of Patagon encampment; from account by French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville

The people encountered by Byron were in all likelihood the Tehuelches, indigenous to the region.

Pico Truncado

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Town and municipality in Santa Cruz Province in southern Argentina.

Town and municipality in Santa Cruz Province in southern Argentina.

In the area there is evidence that 13,000 years ago, Mapuche and Tehuelche communities coexisted, living of hunting guanaco and choiques, fishing, and collecting mapu fruits, enduring strong winds and very cold winters.