Telephone

phonetelephonesLocal Telephone Servicefixed telephonyphonestelephonyFixed-Line TelephonyTelephone numbertelephone receiverfixed
A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly.wikipedia
2,160 Related Articles

Carbon microphone

carbon transmittercarbon button microphonesbutton microphone
Most, however, used the Edison/Berliner carbon transmitter, which was much louder than the other kinds, even though it required an induction coil which was an impedance matching transformer to make it compatible with the impedance of the line.

Induction coil

interrupterRuhmkorff coilcoil
Most, however, used the Edison/Berliner carbon transmitter, which was much louder than the other kinds, even though it required an induction coil which was an impedance matching transformer to make it compatible with the impedance of the line.

Outside plant

outdoor landlinesroadside cabinetsingle cable
One of the jobs of outside plant personnel was to visit each telephone periodically to inspect the battery.

Single-wire earth return

ground returnlow-cost electric intertiessingle wire earth return
Early telephones used a single wire for the subscriber's line, with ground return used to complete the circuit (as used in telegraphs).

Subscription business model

subscriptionsubscribersubscriptions
Instead telephones were leased in pairs to a subscriber, who had to arrange for a telegraph contractor to construct a line between them, for example between a home and a shop.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Western Union, already using telegraph exchanges, quickly extended the principle to its telephones in New York City and San Francisco, and Bell was not slow in appreciating the potential.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
Western Union, already using telegraph exchanges, quickly extended the principle to its telephones in New York City and San Francisco, and Bell was not slow in appreciating the potential.

Switchboard operator

telephone operatoroperatoroperators
The user alerted the other end, or the exchange operator, by whistling into the transmitter.

Whistling

whistlewhistlerwhistles
The user alerted the other end, or the exchange operator, by whistling into the transmitter.

Strowger switch

Strowgerstep-by-stepstep by step
Telephones connected to the earliest Strowger switch automatic exchanges had seven wires, one for the knife switch, one for each telegraph key, one for the bell, one for the push-button and two for speaking.

Switch

switchestoggle switchelectrical switch
Telephones connected to the earliest Strowger switch automatic exchanges had seven wires, one for the knife switch, one for each telegraph key, one for the bell, one for the push-button and two for speaking.

Telegraph key

keyMorse keyfist
Telephones connected to the earliest Strowger switch automatic exchanges had seven wires, one for the knife switch, one for each telegraph key, one for the bell, one for the push-button and two for speaking.

Push-button

buttonbuttonspush button
Telephones connected to the earliest Strowger switch automatic exchanges had seven wires, one for the knife switch, one for each telegraph key, one for the bell, one for the push-button and two for speaking.

Bell box

Large wall telephones in the early 20th century usually incorporated the bell, and separate bell boxes for desk phones dwindled away in the middle of the century.

Mains hum

humhumbucking60-cycle hum
Disadvantages of single wire operation such as crosstalk and hum from nearby AC power wires had already led to the use of twisted pairs and, for long distance telephones, four-wire circuits.

Four-wire circuit

four-wire4-wire4 wire
Disadvantages of single wire operation such as crosstalk and hum from nearby AC power wires had already led to the use of twisted pairs and, for long distance telephones, four-wire circuits.

Long-distance calling

long distancelong-distancelong distance call
Users at the beginning of the 20th century did not place long distance calls from their own telephones but made an appointment to use a special soundproofed long distance telephone booth furnished with the latest technology.

Model 202 telephone

202202 hand telephone202-type
What turned out to be the most popular and longest lasting physical style of telephone was introduced in the early 20th century, including Bell's 202-type desk set.

Electronic switching system

switching systemselectronic switchingdigital switching
With the development of electronic switching systems in the 1960s, telephony gradually evolved towards digital telephony which improved the capacity, quality, and cost of the network.

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
The development of digital data communications method, such as the protocols used for the Internet, it became possible to digitize voice and transmit it as real-time data across computer networks, giving rise to the field of Internet Protocol (IP) telephony, also known as voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), a term that reflects the methodology memorably.

Voice over IP

VoIPvoice over Internet Protocolvoice-over-IP
The development of digital data communications method, such as the protocols used for the Internet, it became possible to digitize voice and transmit it as real-time data across computer networks, giving rise to the field of Internet Protocol (IP) telephony, also known as voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), a term that reflects the methodology memorably.

Disruptive innovation

disruptive technologydisruptive technologiesdisruption
VoIP has proven to be a disruptive technology that is rapidly replacing traditional telephone network infrastructure.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
As of January 2005, up to 10% of telephone subscribers in Japan and South Korea have switched to this digital telephone service.

South Korea

🇰🇷KoreaKOR
As of January 2005, up to 10% of telephone subscribers in Japan and South Korea have switched to this digital telephone service.

Newsweek

Newsweek MagazineNewsweek InternationalNewsweek Japan
A January 2005 Newsweek article suggested that Internet telephony may be "the next big thing."