Telephone line

phone linelinetelephone linestelephone cablephone linestelephone wirecablingtelephonelinestelephone cables
A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.wikipedia
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Telephone number

phone numbertelephone numbersphone numbers
This is the physical wire or other signaling medium connecting the user's telephone apparatus to the telecommunications network, and usually also implies a single telephone number for billing purposes reserved for that user.
A telephone number is a sequence of digits assigned to a fixed-line telephone subscriber station connected to a telephone line or to a wireless electronic telephony device, such as a radio telephone or a mobile telephone, or to other devices for data transmission via the public switched telephone network (PSTN) or other public and private networks.

Digital subscriber line

DSLxDSLDigital Subscriber Line (DSL)
Telephone lines are used to deliver landline telephone service and Digital subscriber line (DSL) phone cable service to the premises.
Digital subscriber line (DSL; originally digital subscriber loop) is a family of technologies that are used to transmit digital data over telephone lines.

Landline

fixed linefixed-lineland line
Telephone lines are used to deliver landline telephone service and Digital subscriber line (DSL) phone cable service to the premises.
A landline telephone (also known as land line, land-line, main line, home phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission.

Public switched telephone network

PSTNtelephone networkpublic telephone network
Telephone overhead lines are connected to the public switched telephone network.
The PSTN consists of telephone lines, fiber optic cables, microwave transmission links, cellular networks, communications satellites, and undersea telephone cables, all interconnected by switching centers, thus allowing most telephones to communicate with each other.

Telephone exchange

exchangescentral officeexchange
In 1878, the Bell Telephone Company began to use two-wire circuits (called the local loop) from each user's telephone to end offices which performed any necessary electrical switching to allow voice signals to be transmitted to more distant telephones. In most cases, two copper wires (tip and ring) for each telephone line run from a home or other small building to a local telephone exchange. Those wires may be connected back to two telephone overhead lines at the local telephone exchange, thus making those jacks RJ14 jacks.
Each operator sat in front of a vertical panel containing banks of ¼-inch tip-ring-sleeve (3-conductor) jacks, each of which was the local termination of a subscriber's telephone line.

Twisted pair

twisted-pairunshielded twisted pairshielded twisted pair
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.
By 1900, the entire American telephone line network was either twisted pair or open wire with transposition to guard against interference.

Tip and ring

pair of wiresR and Ttip
In most cases, two copper wires (tip and ring) for each telephone line run from a home or other small building to a local telephone exchange.
Tip and ring are the names of the two conductors or sides of a telephone line.

Utility pole

telephone poletelegraph poletelephone poles
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.
The most common communication cables found on utility poles are copper or fibre optic cable (FOC) for telephone lines and coaxial cable for cable television (CATV).

Telephone plug

telephone jackphone jackjack
Inside the walls of the house—between the house's outside junction box and the interior wall jacks—the most common telephone cable in new houses is Category 5 cable—4 pairs of 24 AWG (0.205 mm²) solid copper.
Historically, telephones were typically owned by the telephone company and were usually permanently wired to the telephone line.

Local loop

subscriber lineloopsubscriber loop
In 1878, the Bell Telephone Company began to use two-wire circuits (called the local loop) from each user's telephone to end offices which performed any necessary electrical switching to allow voice signals to be transmitted to more distant telephones.
Telephone line

Subscriber loop carrier

a device that convertssubscriber line carrier
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.
Telephone line

Registered jack

RJ11RJ45RJ-45
Those wires may be connected back to two telephone overhead lines at the local telephone exchange, thus making those jacks RJ14 jacks.
It is used to implement a 25-line (or less) telephone connection such as that used in the 1A2 key telephone system.

Jargon

term of arttechnical terminologyterm
A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.

Telecommunication circuit

circuitcircuitsconnection
A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.

Telephone

phonetelephonesLocal Telephone Service
A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.

Wire

stranded wirewire productsinsulated wire
This is the physical wire or other signaling medium connecting the user's telephone apparatus to the telecommunications network, and usually also implies a single telephone number for billing purposes reserved for that user.

Telecommunication

telecommunicationscommunicationstelecom
This is the physical wire or other signaling medium connecting the user's telephone apparatus to the telecommunications network, and usually also implies a single telephone number for billing purposes reserved for that user. A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system.

Invoice

billingbillinvoicing
This is the physical wire or other signaling medium connecting the user's telephone apparatus to the telecommunications network, and usually also implies a single telephone number for billing purposes reserved for that user.

Bell System

BellBell Operating CompaniesBell Telephone
In 1878, the Bell Telephone Company began to use two-wire circuits (called the local loop) from each user's telephone to end offices which performed any necessary electrical switching to allow voice signals to be transmitted to more distant telephones.

Copper

CuCu 2+ cupric
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.

Aluminium

aluminumAlall-metal
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.

Balanced line

balancedbalanced pairbalanced circuit
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.

Analog signal

analoganalogueanalogue signal
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.

Transmission (telecommunications)

transmissiontransmittransmissions
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.

Carrier system

carrier current systemsdigital line
These wires were typically copper, although aluminium has also been used, and were carried in balanced pairs of open wire, separated by about 25 cm (10") on poles above the ground, and later as twisted pair cables. Modern lines may run underground, and may carry analog or digital signals to the exchange, or may have a device that converts the analog signal to digital for transmission on a carrier system.