Cerro de Punta, Puerto Rico's highest peak, and its TV transmission towers
The DuMont Television Network in 1949. DuMont's network of stations stretched from Boston to St. Louis. These stations were linked together via AT&T's coaxial cable feed, allowing the network to broadcast live television programming to all the stations at the same time. Stations not yet connected received kinescope recordings via physical delivery.

A television network or broadcaster is a telecommunications network for distribution of television program content, where a central operation provides programming to many television stations or pay television providers.

- Television broadcasting

A group of television stations with common ownership or affiliation are known as a TV network and an individual station within the network is referred to as O&O or affiliate, respectively.

- Television station
Cerro de Punta, Puerto Rico's highest peak, and its TV transmission towers

7 related topics

Alpha

A live television show set and cameras

Television show

Any content produced for viewing on a television set which can be broadcast via over-the-air, satellite, or cable, excluding breaking news, advertisements, or trailers that are typically placed between shows.

Any content produced for viewing on a television set which can be broadcast via over-the-air, satellite, or cable, excluding breaking news, advertisements, or trailers that are typically placed between shows.

A live television show set and cameras
Tamvisio's camera operators film a television program at Frenckell's studio on January 2, 1965, in Tampere, Finland.
Arthur Schlesinger Jr.

Then they often "pitch" it to the various networks in an attempt to find one interested enough to order a prototype first episode of the series, known as a pilot. Eric Coleman, an animation executive at Disney, told an interviewer, "One misconception is that it's very difficult to get in and pitch your show, when the truth is that development executives at networks want very much to hear ideas. They want very much to get the word out on what types of shows they're looking for."

After production, the show is handed over to the television network, which sends it out to its affiliate stations, which broadcast it in the specified broadcast programming time slot.

Logos of the five major U.S. terrestrial television networks (clockwise from top left: NBC, CBS, ABC, The CW, and Fox.)

Broadcast network

Logos of the five major U.S. terrestrial television networks (clockwise from top left: NBC, CBS, ABC, The CW, and Fox.)
Original major radio broadcasting networks in the United States
The WEAF and WJZ chains

A terrestrial network (or broadcast network in the United States) is a group of radio stations, television stations, or other electronic media outlets, that form an agreement to air, or broadcast, content from a centralized source.

For example, ABC (U.S.), CBC/Radio-Canada (Canada), the BBC (UK), the ABC (Australia), DW (Germany), KBS (South Korea), and NHK (Japan) are TV networks that provide programming for local terrestrial television station affiliates to air using signals that can be picked up by the home television sets of local viewers.

A live television show set and cameras

Local programming

A live television show set and cameras

The terms local programme, local programming, local content or local television refers to a television program made by a television station or independent television producer for broadcast only within the station's transmission area or television market.

In some cases a television network programme may include a local element as well.

A broadcasting antenna in Stuttgart

Network affiliate

A broadcasting antenna in Stuttgart

In the broadcasting industry (particularly in North America), a network affiliate or affiliated station is a local broadcaster, owned by a company other than the owner of the network, which carries some or all of the lineup of television programs or radio programs of a television or radio network.

This distinguishes such a television or radio station from an owned-and-operated station (O&O), which is owned by the parent network.

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Television channel

Terrestrial frequency or virtual number over which a television station or television network is distributed.

Terrestrial frequency or virtual number over which a television station or television network is distributed.

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Commonly, the term "television channel" is used to mean a television station or its pay television counterpart (both outlined below).

Sometimes, especially outside the U.S. and in the context of pay television, it is used instead of the term television network, which otherwise (in its technical use above) describes a group of geographically-distributed television stations that share affiliation/ownership and some or all of their programming with one another.

Fox Business Network's Master Control

Master control

Fox Business Network's Master Control
One of ESPN's new digital master control rooms, MCR-D1, in Bristol, Connecticut.
Fox Business Network's Master Control with lights off
Fox Business Network's Master Control room with lights on.

Master control is the technical hub of a broadcast operation common among most over-the-air television stations and television networks.

Entrance to Comcast Building, New York City, home of WNBC, the flagship station of NBC

Flagship (broadcasting)

Entrance to Comcast Building, New York City, home of WNBC, the flagship station of NBC

In broadcasting, a flagship (also known as a flagship station or key station) is the broadcast station which originates a television network, or a particular radio or television program that plays a key role in the branding of and consumer loyalty to a network or station.

A flagship television station is the principal privately owned television station of a television network in the United States, Canada, Brazil, Japan, Mexico, Australia and the Philippines.