Television in Japan

Japanese televisionJapanese television programstelevisioncourcoursJapanJapaneseTVQ Kyushu Broadcasting CoTVQ Kyushu Broadcasting Co.broadcast nationally
Television in Japan was introduced in 1939.wikipedia
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NTSC

analogNTSC-M30p
A modified version of the NTSC system for analog signals, called NTSC-J, was used for analog broadcast between 1950 and the early 2010s.
It was used in most of North America and western South America, Liberia; Myanmar, South Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Japan, and some Pacific island nations and territories (see map).

Terrestrial television

Broadcastover-the-airterrestrial
The fee varies from ¥14,910 to ¥28,080 depending on the method and timing of payment and on whether one receives only terrestrial television or also satellite broadcasts.
Terrestrial television broadcast in Asia started as early as 1939 in Japan through a series of experiments done by NHK Broadcasting Institute of Technology.

NTSC-J

JJapanese
A modified version of the NTSC system for analog signals, called NTSC-J, was used for analog broadcast between 1950 and the early 2010s.
* Television in Japan

Outline of television broadcasting

television broadcastingTelevision stationstelevision
Regular television broadcasting in Japan started in 1950.

Japanese television drama

dramaJapanese dramatelevision drama
After 9:00 they switch over to Japanese television dramas and programs focusing on older age groups, which run till 10:00 or 11:00 PM.
Japanese television drama, also called dorama, are television programs that are a staple of Japanese television and are broadcast daily.

Prime time

primetimeprime-timeprimetime television
Evening news programs air as early as before 4:00 PM or before 5:00 PM and end at 7:00 PM, when the "Golden Hour" of TV shows start.
In Japanese television, prime time runs from 19:00 to 23:00.

Nippon TV

NTVNippon TelevisionNihon TV
In 1953, the public NHK General TV and the commercial Nippon Television were launched in the span of a few months.

TV Tokyo

TXBS JapanTokyo Channel 12
In Japan, major national TV networks, such as TV Tokyo broadcast anime regularly.
* Television in Japan

Hobankyo

Hōbankyō is an entity, representing Japan-based television networks, Japanese anime manufacturers, screenwriters and.

NHK

NHK BS PremiumJapan Broadcasting CorporationNHK BS2
All Japanese households having at least one television set are mandated to pay an annual subscription fee used to fund NHK, the Japanese public service broadcaster.

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
All Japanese households having at least one television set are mandated to pay an annual subscription fee used to fund NHK, the Japanese public service broadcaster. Television in Japan was introduced in 1939.

Kenjiro Takayanagi

All-electronic television
However, experiments date back to the 1920s, with Kenjiro Takayanagi's pioneering experiments in electronic television.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
Television in Japan was introduced in 1939. However, experiments date back to the 1920s, with Kenjiro Takayanagi's pioneering experiments in electronic television.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Television broadcasting was halted by World War II, after which regular television broadcasting began in 1950.

High-definition television

HDTVhigh definitionHD
After Japan developed the first HDTV systems in the 1960s, MUSE/Hi-Vision was introduced in the 1970s.

Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding

Hi-VisionMUSE1035i30
After Japan developed the first HDTV systems in the 1960s, MUSE/Hi-Vision was introduced in the 1970s.

Ishikawa Prefecture

IshikawaIshikawa, JapanIshikawa-ken
Between 2010 and 2012, the analog broadcast was replaced with digital broadcasts using the ISDB standard (which was introduced in 2003) in three stages: a technical trial occurred on July 24, 2010 in which analog translators ceased operation in northeastern Ishikawa Prefecture, the analog transmitters in the rest of Ishikawa and 43 other prefectures were shut down on July 24, 2011, and those in the prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima ceased transmission on March 31, 2012, as a result of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Iwate Prefecture

IwateIwate, JapanIwate-ken
Between 2010 and 2012, the analog broadcast was replaced with digital broadcasts using the ISDB standard (which was introduced in 2003) in three stages: a technical trial occurred on July 24, 2010 in which analog translators ceased operation in northeastern Ishikawa Prefecture, the analog transmitters in the rest of Ishikawa and 43 other prefectures were shut down on July 24, 2011, and those in the prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima ceased transmission on March 31, 2012, as a result of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Miyagi Prefecture

MiyagiMiyagi, JapanMiyagi-ken
Between 2010 and 2012, the analog broadcast was replaced with digital broadcasts using the ISDB standard (which was introduced in 2003) in three stages: a technical trial occurred on July 24, 2010 in which analog translators ceased operation in northeastern Ishikawa Prefecture, the analog transmitters in the rest of Ishikawa and 43 other prefectures were shut down on July 24, 2011, and those in the prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima ceased transmission on March 31, 2012, as a result of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Fukushima Prefecture

FukushimaFukushima, JapanFukushima coast
Between 2010 and 2012, the analog broadcast was replaced with digital broadcasts using the ISDB standard (which was introduced in 2003) in three stages: a technical trial occurred on July 24, 2010 in which analog translators ceased operation in northeastern Ishikawa Prefecture, the analog transmitters in the rest of Ishikawa and 43 other prefectures were shut down on July 24, 2011, and those in the prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima ceased transmission on March 31, 2012, as a result of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami

Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami2011 Tōhoku earthquakeGreat East Japan earthquake
Between 2010 and 2012, the analog broadcast was replaced with digital broadcasts using the ISDB standard (which was introduced in 2003) in three stages: a technical trial occurred on July 24, 2010 in which analog translators ceased operation in northeastern Ishikawa Prefecture, the analog transmitters in the rest of Ishikawa and 43 other prefectures were shut down on July 24, 2011, and those in the prefectures of Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima ceased transmission on March 31, 2012, as a result of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Television set

TV settelevision receivertelevisions
All Japanese households having at least one television set are mandated to pay an annual subscription fee used to fund NHK, the Japanese public service broadcaster.