Temperance movement

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The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages.wikipedia
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Teetotalism

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Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence from alcohol (teetotalism), and its leaders emphasize alcohol's negative effects on people's health, personalities and family lives.
The Preston Temperance Society was founded in 1833 by Joseph Livesey, who was to become a leader of the temperance movement and the author of The Pledge: "We agree to abstain from all liquors of an intoxicating quality whether ale, porter, wine or ardent spirits, except as medicine."

Prohibition in the United States

ProhibitionProhibition eraProhibition-era
During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the temperance movement became prominent in many countries, particularly in English-speaking and Scandinavian ones, and it eventually led to Prohibition in the United States which lasted from 1920 to 1933.
In the United States, after the battle against slavery was won (and even prior to it with the 1851 Maine law), social moralists turned to other issues, such as Mormon polygamy and the temperance movement.

Prohibition

prohibition of alcoholalcohol prohibitiondry
Typically the movement promotes alcohol education and it also demands the passage of new laws against the sale of alcohol, either regulations on the availability of alcohol, or the complete prohibition of it.
The Nordic countries, with the exception of Denmark, have had a strong temperance movement since the late 1800s, closely linked to the Christian revival movement of the late 19th century, but also to several worker organisations.

Temperance movement in Australia

Temperancetemperance movementAustralia
The 1830s saw a tremendous growth in temperance groups, not just in England and the United States, but also in British colonies, especially New Zealand and Australia.
The Temperance movement in Australia is a movement that aims to curb the drinking of alcohol.

Alcohol education

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Typically the movement promotes alcohol education and it also demands the passage of new laws against the sale of alcohol, either regulations on the availability of alcohol, or the complete prohibition of it.
Organizations such as the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the United States were founded to promulgate alcohol education alongside those of the temperance movement, such as the American Council on Alcohol Problems.

Temperance movement in Ireland

Hibernian Temperance SocietyIrelandIrish
The Catholic temperance movement started in 1838 when the Irish priest Theobald Mathew established the Teetotal Abstinence Society in 1838.
The Temperance movement in Ireland was an influential movement dedicated to lowering consumption of alcohol that involved both Protestant and Catholic religious leaders.

American Temperance Union

American Temperance Union’s
In the US, the American Temperance Union advocated total abstinence from distilled and fermented liquors.
A national temperance union called the American Society for the Promotion of Temperance was formed in Boston in 1826.

Woman's Christian Temperance Union

Women's Christian Temperance UnionWCTUWoman’s Christian Temperance Union
New and revitalized organizations emerged including the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) and the early Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). Many of the most important prohibitionist groups, such as the avowedly prohibitionist United Kingdom Alliance (1853) and the US-based (but international) Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU; 1873), began in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the latter of which was one of the largest women's societies in the world at that time.
The Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) is an active international temperance organization that was among the first organizations of women devoted to social reform with a program that "linked the religious and the secular through concerted and far-reaching reform strategies based on applied Christianity."

Methodism

MethodistMethodist ChurchMethodists
In 1743, John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist Churches, proclaimed "that buying, selling, and drinking of liquor, unless absolutely necessary, were evils to be avoided". Reflecting the teaching on alcohol of their founder John Wesley, Methodist Churches were aligned with the temperance movement.
British Methodists, in particular the Primitive Methodists, took a leading role in the temperance movement of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Catholic temperance movement

Catholic temperance groupsCatholic Total Abstinence Union of AmericaTemperance
The Catholic temperance movement started in 1838 when the Irish priest Theobald Mathew established the Teetotal Abstinence Society in 1838.
Catholic involvement in the temperance movement has been very strong since at least the nineteenth century with a number of specifically Roman Catholic societies formed to encourage moderation or total abstinence from alcohol.

Temperance (virtue)

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On August 14, 1829 he wrote a letter in the Belfast Telegraph publicizing his views on temperance.
The term "temperance" can also refer to the abstention from alcohol (teetotalism), especially with reference to the temperance movement.

Neal Dow

Neal S. DowDow, Neal
Maine Law was passed in 1851 by the efforts of Neal Dow.
Nicknamed the "Napoleon of Temperance" and the "Father of Prohibition", Dow was born to a Quaker family in Portland, Maine.

Massachusetts

MACommonwealth of MassachusettsMass.
In 1838, Massachusetts banned certain sales of spirits.
Before the American Civil War, Massachusetts was a center for the abolitionist, temperance, and transcendentalist movements.

American Temperance Society

In the same year, the American Temperance Society (ATS) was formed in Boston, Massachusetts, within 12 years claiming more than 8,000 local groups and over 1,250,000 members.
The society benefited from, and contributed to, a reform sentiment in much of the country promoting the abolition of slavery, expanding women's rights, temperance, and the improvement of society.

Moralism

moralistmoralistsmoralistic
As an expression of moralism, the membership of the temperance movement overlapped with that of the abolitionist movement and women's suffrage movement.
It has strongly affected American and British culture, concerning private issues such as the family unit and sexuality, as well as issues that carry over into the public square, such as the temperance movement.

Prohibition Party

ProhibitionProhibitionistMark R. Shaw
The National Prohibition Party which was led by John Russell gradually became more popular, gaining more votes, as they felt that the existing Democrat and Republican parties did not do enough for the temperance cause.
The party is an integral part of the temperance movement.

Knights of Father Mathew

Teetotal Abstinence SocietyKnights of Father MatthewAbstinence Society
The Catholic temperance movement started in 1838 when the Irish priest Theobald Mathew established the Teetotal Abstinence Society in 1838.
The Knights of Father Mathew was a Catholic temperance society that originated in Ireland and promoted complete abstinence from intoxicating liquors.

John Edgar (minister)

John EdgarDr. John Edgar
Temperance societies were being organized in England about the same time, many inspired by a Belfast professor of theology, and Presbyterian Church of Ireland minister John Edgar, who poured his stock of whiskey out of his window in 1829.
Edgar is known as the origin of the Temperance Movement because he poured alcohol out his window in 1829.

Maine law

Maine Liquor Lawtee-totaling State of Mainea law was passed in Maine
Maine Law was passed in 1851 by the efforts of Neal Dow. In 1846, a law was passed in Maine which was a full-fledged prohibition, and this was followed by bans in several other states in the next two decades.
The Maine Law (or "Maine Liquor Law"), passed on June 2, 1851 in Maine, was one of the first statutory implementations of the developing temperance movement in the United States.

Independent Order of Rechabites

RechabitesUnited Order of Female RechabitesIOR Australia
A general movement to build alternatives to replace the functions of public bars existed, so the Independent Order of Rechabites was formed in England, with a branch later opening in the US as a friendly society that did not hold meetings in public bars.
The Independent Order of Rechabites (IOR), also known as the Sons and Daughters of Rechab, is a fraternal organisation and friendly society founded in England in 1835 as part of the wider temperance movement to promote total abstinence from alcoholic beverages.

Christian views on alcohol

Christianity and alcoholAbstinence from alcoholtotal abstinence from alcohol
Reflecting the teaching on alcohol of their founder John Wesley, Methodist Churches were aligned with the temperance movement.
Many Protestant churches, particularly Methodists, advocated abstentionism and were early leaders in the temperance movement of the 19th and 20th centuries.

United Kingdom Alliance

Many of the most important prohibitionist groups, such as the avowedly prohibitionist United Kingdom Alliance (1853) and the US-based (but international) Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU; 1873), began in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the latter of which was one of the largest women's societies in the world at that time.
The United Kingdom Alliance was a temperance movement in the United Kingdom founded in 1853 in Manchester to work for the prohibition of the trade in alcohol in the United Kingdom.

Abolitionism

abolitionistabolition of slaveryabolitionists
As an expression of moralism, the membership of the temperance movement overlapped with that of the abolitionist movement and women's suffrage movement. This included abolitionism and temperance.
Abolitionism in the United States became a popular expression of moralism, operating in tandem with other social reform efforts, such as the temperance movement, and much more problematically, the women's suffrage movement.

Benjamin Rush

Dr. Benjamin RushRushBenjamin F. Rush
As early as the 1790s, physician Benjamin Rush researched the danger that drinking alcohol could lead to disease that leads to a lack of self-control and he cited abstinence as the only treatment option.
Rush fought for temperance, and both public and Sunday schools.

William Apess

William Appess
The Pequot writer and minister William Apess (1798–1839) established the first formal Native American temperance society among the Maspee Indians on 11 October 1833.
In 1833, during a visit to the town of Mashpee, the largest Native American town in Massachusetts, Apess established the first formal Native American temperance society among the Maspee Indians on 11 October 1833.