Tengah Air Base

RAF TengahTengahTengah AirfieldRAF Station Tengahaerodrome at TengahR.A.F. station at TengahRoyal Air Force TengahTenga
Tengah Air Base is a military airbase of the Republic of Singapore Air Force located in the Western Water Catchment, in the western part of Singapore.wikipedia
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Republic of Singapore Air Force

Air ForceRSAFSingapore
Tengah Air Base is a military airbase of the Republic of Singapore Air Force located in the Western Water Catchment, in the western part of Singapore.
On 1 August 1969, Minister for the Interior and Defence, Lim Kim San, inaugurated the Flying Training School (FTS) at Tengah Air Base (then known as RAF Tengah).

Singapore

🇸🇬Republic of SingaporeSingaporean
Tengah Air Base is a military airbase of the Republic of Singapore Air Force located in the Western Water Catchment, in the western part of Singapore.
It was defended by heavy 15-inch naval guns stationed at Fort Siloso, Fort Canning and Labrador, as well as a Royal Air Force airfield at Tengah Air Base.

Bombing of Singapore (1941)

Singaporefirst air raid on SingaporeBombing of Singapore
Tengah airfield was the target of carpet bombing when 17 Japanese Navy bombers conducted the first air raid on Singapore, shortly after the Battle of Malaya began.
Their targets were RAF Tengah, RAF Seletar, Sembawang Naval Base and Keppel Harbour.

Sembawang Air Base

SembawangRAF SembawangSimbang
After the Japanese capture of Singapore, Tengah came under the control of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force while the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service took over the other two RAF stations of Sembawang Air Base and RAF Seletar as Singapore was split into north-south sphere of control.
Singapore was split into north-south spheres of control, and the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force took over RAF Tengah.

Battle of Sarimbun Beach

Sarimbun Beachassault at Sarimbun Beachinvaded Singapore
It was also the first airfield to be captured when Japanese forces invaded Singapore.
The main Japanese objective to be attained following their landing at Sarimbun Beach was the capture of Tengah Airfield.

Seletar Airport

RAF SeletarSeletarmilitary airfield
After the Japanese capture of Singapore, Tengah came under the control of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force while the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service took over the other two RAF stations of Sembawang Air Base and RAF Seletar as Singapore was split into north-south sphere of control.
During the Japanese occupation, Seletar as was in the case of Sembawang came under the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service while Tengah fell under the jurisdiction of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force.

Singapore Naval Base

Singaporenaval baseSembawang Naval Base
This effectively ensured that the Japanese Army took control of the south, including the administrative hub and population center of Singapore City, while the Japanese Navy took command of the north, which included the Royal Navy dockyard at Sembawang.
Air defence relied on the Royal Air Force airfields at RAF Tengah and RAF Sembawang.

Sembawang

Sembawang wharfJalan Ulu SembawangSembawang New Town
This effectively ensured that the Japanese Army took control of the south, including the administrative hub and population center of Singapore City, while the Japanese Navy took command of the north, which included the Royal Navy dockyard at Sembawang.
After the end of World War II in 1945, both bases were reverted to British control and would eventually go on to play an important part in Britain's continued military presence in the Far East (along with the three other RAF bases in Singapore: RAF Changi, RAF Seletar and RAF Tengah) during the critical period of Malayan Emergency (1948–1960), the Brunei Revolt in 1962 and during the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation (1962–1966).

Avro Lincoln

LincolnLincolnsAvro Lincoln B.2
During the Malayan Emergency, Tengah was used to house Avro Lincolns of the Royal Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force and Bristol Brigands of No 84 Squadron RAF which performed bombing sorties on communist terrorist bases/hideouts of the Malayan Communist Party deep in the jungles of Peninsular Malaysia.
In Malayan theatre, RAF Lincolns were operated from Changi Air Base and Tengah Air Base.

No. 74 Squadron RAF

74 SquadronNo. 74 Squadron74 Sqn
During the period of Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation, the RAF deployed 74 Squadron with its English Electric Lightning F.6 followed by 20 Squadron with its Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft in addition to the Gloster Javelins of 60 Squadron and 64 Squadron, to the airfield to help upgrade the air defence of Singapore and Peninsula Malaysia against infrequent air incursions from the MiG-21s and P-51 Mustangs of the Indonesian Air Force.
Between 1967 and 1971, they were based at RAF Tengah, Singapore, becoming one of the last RAF Far East Air Force squadrons to operate from there before 'the Tigers' disbanded.

No. 20 Squadron RAF

No. 20 Squadron RFCNo. 20 Squadron20 Squadron
During the period of Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation, the RAF deployed 74 Squadron with its English Electric Lightning F.6 followed by 20 Squadron with its Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft in addition to the Gloster Javelins of 60 Squadron and 64 Squadron, to the airfield to help upgrade the air defence of Singapore and Peninsula Malaysia against infrequent air incursions from the MiG-21s and P-51 Mustangs of the Indonesian Air Force.
The squadron was disbanded in 1960, only to be reformed again at RAF Tengah, Singapore, again operating Hunters.

Bristol Brigand

BrigandBristol Type 164 BrigandBrigand B.1/T.4/T.5
During the Malayan Emergency, Tengah was used to house Avro Lincolns of the Royal Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force and Bristol Brigands of No 84 Squadron RAF which performed bombing sorties on communist terrorist bases/hideouts of the Malayan Communist Party deep in the jungles of Peninsular Malaysia.
The first unit to convert from Beaufighters to the Brigand was 45 Squadron, based at RAF Station Tengah on the Island of Singapore, operating in support of British forces against the Communist Guerrillas, engaged in an insurgency in Malaya.

List of accidents and incidents involving the Lockheed C-130 Hercules

crashedIndonesian Air Force (A-1324)C-130H 5-8552
On 3 September 1964, an Indonesian Air Force C-130 Hercules crashed into the Straits of Malacca while trying to evade interception by a Javelin FAW.9 of No 60 Squadron.
September 3, 1964: C-130B T-1307 of the Indonesian Air Force and operated by 31 Squadron crashed into the Straits of Malacca whilst evading interception by a Royal Air Force Javelin FAW.9 of 60 Squadron from RAF Tengah. This was the first non-U.S. Hercules hull loss.

Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation

ConfrontationKonfrontasiBorneo
During the period of Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation, the RAF deployed 74 Squadron with its English Electric Lightning F.6 followed by 20 Squadron with its Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft in addition to the Gloster Javelins of 60 Squadron and 64 Squadron, to the airfield to help upgrade the air defence of Singapore and Peninsula Malaysia against infrequent air incursions from the MiG-21s and P-51 Mustangs of the Indonesian Air Force.
The remaining C-130 crashed into the Malacca Straits while trying to evade interception by an RAF Javelin FAW 9 launched from RAF Tengah.

No. 75 Squadron RNZAF

75 Squadron75 Squadron RNZAFNo. 75 (New Zealand) Squadron
In 1958 they were joined by 45 Squadron and No. 75 Squadron RNZAF, both equipped with English Electric Canberra B.2.
From 1958 to 1962 the squadron operated nine English Electric Canberras, on loan from the RAF, out of RAF Tengah, Singapore.

No. 45 Squadron RAF

No. 45 Squadron45 SquadronNo. 45 Squadron RFC
In 1958 they were joined by 45 Squadron and No. 75 Squadron RNZAF, both equipped with English Electric Canberra B.2.
After the Second World War, 45 Squadron served in the Malayan Emergency, flying out of RAF Station Tengah on the island of Singapore.

Gloster Javelin

JavelinJavelin FAW.9Gloster Javelin FAW.5
During the period of Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation, the RAF deployed 74 Squadron with its English Electric Lightning F.6 followed by 20 Squadron with its Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft in addition to the Gloster Javelins of 60 Squadron and 64 Squadron, to the airfield to help upgrade the air defence of Singapore and Peninsula Malaysia against infrequent air incursions from the MiG-21s and P-51 Mustangs of the Indonesian Air Force.
Javelins of 60 Squadron, later joined by 64 Squadron operated out of RAF Tengah, Singapore flying combat patrols over the jungles of Malaysia.

English Electric Lightning

LightningLightningsBAC Lightning
During the period of Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation, the RAF deployed 74 Squadron with its English Electric Lightning F.6 followed by 20 Squadron with its Hawker Hunter fighter aircraft in addition to the Gloster Javelins of 60 Squadron and 64 Squadron, to the airfield to help upgrade the air defence of Singapore and Peninsula Malaysia against infrequent air incursions from the MiG-21s and P-51 Mustangs of the Indonesian Air Force.
In 1967 No. 74 Squadron was moved to RAF Tengah, Singapore to take over the air defence role from the Gloster Javelin equipped 60 Squadron. The squadron was disbanded in 1971 following the withdrawal of British forces from Singapore.

RSAF Black Knights

Black Knightsphoto gallery
RSAF Black Knights – the official RSAF Aerobatic team with F-16Cs from various squadrons.
The Black Knights is also the formation insignia of Tengah Air Base, home to the RSAF's fighter aircraft and the RSAF Black Knights.

No. 60 Squadron RAF

No. 60 SquadronNo. 60 Squadron RFC60 Squadron
In 1952 No 45 Squadron was equipped with DH Hornets and re-equipped with DH Venoms in 1955 at RAF Butterworth when No 45 Squadron was amalgamated with No 33 Squadron] T.11's of 60 Squadron, joined by 14 Squadron of the Royal New Zealand Air Force.
By the time Gloster Meteor night-fighters arrived in October 1959, the unit had returned to RAF Tengah in Singapore.

No. 14 Squadron RNZAF

No. 14 Squadron14 SquadronNos. 14
In 1952 No 45 Squadron was equipped with DH Hornets and re-equipped with DH Venoms in 1955 at RAF Butterworth when No 45 Squadron was amalgamated with No 33 Squadron] T.11's of 60 Squadron, joined by 14 Squadron of the Royal New Zealand Air Force.
No 14 Squadron operated from RAF Tengah with detachments to Labuan (North Borneo) October/November 1964, RAF Gong Kedak (Malayan Peninsular) June 1965 and RAF Kai Tak (Hong Kong) October 1966.

RMAF Butterworth

ButterworthRAAF Base ButterworthRAAF Butterworth
As a show of force to deter the Indonesian President Sukarno from launching an all-out war during this period, the RAF also deployed a V bomber force detachment to Tengah in the form of Handley Page Victor B.1A bombers from 15 Squadron in August 1963, which was rotated with those dispersed to RAAF Butterworth in Malaysia.
The station also served as a vital front-line airfield for various other units on rotation from RAF Changi, RAF Kuala Lumpur, RAF Kuantan, RAF Seletar and RAF Tengah; RAF aircraft would also use the base as a transit point to and from other RAF bases in the Far East region (including Singapore, North Borneo and Hong Kong) connecting it between RAF stations in the Indian Ocean, Middle East and Mediterranean regions.

111 Squadron, Republic of Singapore Air Force

111 SQN111 Squadron
111 Squadron with 4 G550 CAEW
Based at Tengah Air Base, its primary function is to perform airborne surveillance and early warning.

143 Squadron, Republic of Singapore Air Force

143 Sqn143 Squadron143 Squadron "Phoenix
143 Squadron with 12 F-16C/D
Based in Tengah Airbase, it specialises in intercepting aerial targets, assisting the air-to-ground operations of sister squadron, the 140 Squadron.

140 Squadron, Republic of Singapore Air Force

140 Squadron140 SQN140 Sqn "The Ospreys
140 Squadron with 12 F-16C/D
Based in Tengah Air Base, the squadron goes by the motto "Stand Firm in Defence" with the Osprey adopted as its mascot.