Territories of the United States

The American Samoa Fono
Building where the Supreme Court of Guam is located
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Protestant Cay in Christiansted, U.S. Virgin Islands
Tumon Beach in Guam
Mount Tapochau in the Northern Mariana Islands
Ofu Beach on Ofu Island in American Samoa
Wake Island lagoon
Red-footed booby at Palmyra Atoll
Navy memorial and albatross monument with Laysan albatross chicks at Midway Atoll
The United States from 1868 to 1876, including nine organized and two unorganized (at the time) territories
View of El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico
Hand-drawn map, 2018
alt=Official photo, with American flag|Amata Coleman Radewagen (R), (American Samoa)
alt=Official photo|Michael San Nicolas (D), (Guam)
alt=Official photo|Gregorio Sablan (D), (Northern Mariana Islands)
alt=Official photo|Jenniffer González (R), (Puerto Rico)
alt=Official photo|Stacey Plaskett (D), (U.S. Virgin Islands)
alt=Lemanu Peleti Mauga|Lemanu Peleti Mauga (NP-D), (American Samoa)
alt=Lou Leon Guerrero|Lou Leon Guerrero (D), (Guam)
alt=A smiling Ralph Torres|Ralph Torres (R), (Northern Mariana Islands)
alt=Pedro Pierluisi|Pedro Pierluisi (PNP-D), (Puerto Rico)
alt=Albert Bryan|Albert Bryan (D), (U.S. Virgin Islands)
Tutuila and Aunu'u (American Samoa)
Guam
Saipan (Northern Mariana Islands)
Puerto Rico
U.S. Virgin Islands
alt=Satellite photo|Baker Island
alt=Satellite photo|Howland Island
alt=Satellite photo|Jarvis Island
alt=Satellite photo|Johnston Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Kingman Reef
alt=Satellite photo|Midway Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Navassa Island
alt=Satellite photo|Palmyra Atoll
alt=Satellite photo|Wake Island
American Samoa
Guam
Northern Mariana Islands
Puerto Rico
U.S. Virgin Islands
U.S. exclusive economic zone

Territories of the United States are sub-national administrative divisions overseen by the U.S. federal government.

- Territories of the United States

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Palmyra Atoll

One of the Northern Line Islands .

One of the Northern Line Islands .

Palmyra Atoll – NOAA Nautical Chart (1:47,500)
Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll
Welcome sign for Palmyra Atoll, June 2005
Palmyra's North Beach
Palmyra Atoll viewed from the northwest, 2011
Green sea turtle at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
Coral reef at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
Tallest Pisonia grandis tree at Palmyra, with Henry E. Cooper in 1913
alt=A satellite image|Palmyra Atoll, 2010 satellite image
alt=Coconut trees overlooking a small inlet|Coconut palms on Strawn Island at Palmyra Atoll

It is administered as an incorporated unorganized territory, presently the only one of its kind, by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Northwest Territory of the United States, 1787

Organic act

Northwest Territory of the United States, 1787
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This 1856 map shows slave states (gray), free states (pink), U.S. territories (green), and Kansas in center (white).

In United States law, an organic act is an act of the United States Congress that establishes a territory of the United States and specifies how it is to be governed, or an agency to manage certain federal lands.

John A. Burns of Hawaii, the last of a series of delegates to continuously serve in Congress

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives (called either delegates or resident commissioner, in the case of Puerto Rico) are representatives of their territory in the House of Representatives, who do not have a right to vote on proposed legislation in the full House but nevertheless have floor privileges and are able to participate in certain other House functions.

Non-voting members of the United States House of Representatives (called either delegates or resident commissioner, in the case of Puerto Rico) are representatives of their territory in the House of Representatives, who do not have a right to vote on proposed legislation in the full House but nevertheless have floor privileges and are able to participate in certain other House functions.

John A. Burns of Hawaii, the last of a series of delegates to continuously serve in Congress
Federico Degetau y González of Puerto Rico, The first resident commissioner in the United States Congress
Amata C. Radewagen is American Samoa's first female delegate
Walter E. Fauntroy, delegate from the District of Columbia from 1971 to 1991
Choctaw Nation Delegate to Washington Peter Pitchlynn who served as ambassador from 1845 to 1861 and again from 1866 to 1881
Cherokee Nation Delegate to Congress Kimberly Teehee

There are currently six non-voting members: a delegate representing the District of Columbia, a resident commissioner representing Puerto Rico, as well as one delegate for each of the other four permanently inhabited U.S. territories: American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

A map showing the contiguous United States and, in insets at the lower left, the two states that are not contiguous

Contiguous United States

The contiguous United States or officially the conterminous United States, also known as the Lower 48, consists of the 48 adjoining U.S. states and the District of Columbia on the continent of North America.

The contiguous United States or officially the conterminous United States, also known as the Lower 48, consists of the 48 adjoining U.S. states and the District of Columbia on the continent of North America.

A map showing the contiguous United States and, in insets at the lower left, the two states that are not contiguous
Map showing Alaska's actual physical relationship with the Lower 48

These differ from the related term continental United States, which includes Alaska (also on the North American continent but separated from the 48 states by British Columbia and Yukon of Canada) but excludes the Hawaiian Islands and all U.S. territories in the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

Article Four of the United States Constitution

Article Four of the United States Constitution outlines the relationship between the various states, as well as the relationship between each state and the United States federal government.

Article Four of the United States Constitution outlines the relationship between the various states, as well as the relationship between each state and the United States federal government.

Page one of the officially engrossed copy of the Constitution signed by delegates. A print run of 500 copies of the final version preceded this copy.

It also empowers Congress to admit new states and administer the territories and other federal lands.

Territory of Hawaii

Organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from April 30, 1900, until August 21, 1959, when most of its territory, excluding Palmyra Island, was admitted to the United States as the 50th U.S. state, the State of Hawaii.

Organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from April 30, 1900, until August 21, 1959, when most of its territory, excluding Palmyra Island, was admitted to the United States as the 50th U.S. state, the State of Hawaii.

Main islands of the Territory of Hawaii
Cartoon depicting the United States, its territories, and U.S. controlled regions as a classroom with belligerent Philippines, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Cuba
Main islands of the Territory of Hawaii
Matson Navigation Company advertised Hawaii as a tourist destination for the first time in the late 1890s.
All islands voted at least 93 percent in favor of Admission acts. Ballot (inset) and referendum results for the Admission Act of 1959.

On July 4, 1898, the United States Congress passed the Newlands Resolution authorizing the U.S. annexation of the Republic of Hawaii, and five weeks later, on August 12, Hawaii became a U.S. territory.

Coat of arms

Federal government of the United States

Coat of arms
Political system of the United States
Seal of the U.S. Congress
The 435 seats of the House grouped by state
The United States Capitol is the seat of government for Congress.
Seal of the president of the United States
Uncle Sam, a common personification of the United States Federal Government
Seal of the vice president of the United States
Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
Federal Revenue and Spending
Diagram of the Federal Government and American Union, 1862
The states of the United States as divided into counties (or, in Louisiana and Alaska, parishes and boroughs, respectively). Alaska and Hawaii are not to scale and the Aleutian and uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands have been omitted.

The federal government of the United States (U.S. federal government or U.S. government) is the national government of the United States, a federal republic in North America, composed of 50 states, a city within a federal district (the city of Washington in the District of Columbia, where the entire federal government is based), five major self-governing territories and several island possessions.

American Samoa

Samoa Islands
German, British and American warships in Apia Harbor, Samoa, 1899
1896 map of the Samoa Islands
Tuimanua Elisala Alalamua, the last official titleholder of Tui Manuʻa (1899–1909)
Rear Admiral Benjamin Franklin Tilley, the first Governor of American Samoa (1900–1901)
Commander John Martin Poyer served as the 12th Governor of American Samoa (1915–1919).
Locations of Pacific Ocean splashdowns of American spacecraft
Death of Fleuriot de Langle in 1787
English author W. Somerset Maugham stayed at Sadie Thompson Inn during his six-week visit to Pago Pago in 1916.
Pago Pago Harbor today and inter-island dock area
The Samoan Clipper
Tonga Trench south of the Samoa Islands and north of New Zealand
Lemanu Peleti Mauga, the 58th and incumbent Governor of American Samoa (2021–present)
Map of American Samoa
Cockscomb Point on Pola Island is seen jutting into the ocean.
A view of American Samoa's Ofu Beach on Ofu Island in the Manuʻa Islands
Coastline of American Samoa (in Vatia)
A proportional representation of American Samoa exports, 2019
Tuna boats in the port of Pago Pago
Mascot "Charlie the Tuna" at the StarKist cannery in Atuʻu
The current territorial license plate design, introduced in 2011
American Samoa Route Marker – Main Road
Zion Church in Leone
One of many churches in Samoa
American Samoa Community College
Leone High School
Jean P. Haydon Museum in Pago Pago
American Samoa at the South Pacific Games
High school football game
Pola Island
Aunuʻu Island
National Natural Landmarks
Matafao Peak National Natural Landmark
The Samoa flying fox is only found in Fiji and the Samoan Islands.
The Blue-crowned lorikeet is the only parrot found in American Samoa.

American Samoa (Amerika Sāmoa, ; also Amelika Sāmoa or Sāmoa Amelika) is an unincorporated territory of the United States located in the South Pacific Ocean, southeast of the independent state of Samoa.

Missouri Territory

Organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from June 4, 1812, until August 10, 1821.

Organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from June 4, 1812, until August 10, 1821.

Map of the Territory of Missouri in 1812
Missouri Territory, formerly Louisiana, 	1814 map

The remaining portion of the territory, consisting of the present states of Iowa, Nebraska, and the Dakotas, most of Kansas, Wyoming, and Montana, and parts of Colorado, Minnesota and New Mexico, effectively became an unorganized territory after Missouri became a state.

Physicist Albert Einstein receiving his Certificate of Naturalization from Judge Phillip Forman in 1940.

United States nationality law

United States nationality law details the conditions in which a person holds United States nationality.

United States nationality law details the conditions in which a person holds United States nationality.

Physicist Albert Einstein receiving his Certificate of Naturalization from Judge Phillip Forman in 1940.
A judge swears in a new citizen. New York, 1910
A State Department certification of birth abroad, issued prior to 1990.
A State Department certification of report of birth, issued between 1990 and 2010.
A State Department consular report of birth abroad, issued beginning 2011.
Message in the passport of an American Samoan stating that the passport holder is a national, not citizen, of the U.S.
A certificate of naturalization (1955)
A person holding up their certificate of derivative citizenship (2010)
A Certificate of Loss of Nationality, signifying that the bearer has relinquished or renounced U.S. nationality.

Individuals born in any of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia or almost any inhabited territory are natural-born United States citizens.