Terry Carr

CarrTerry Gene Carr
Terry Gene Carr (February 19, 1937 – April 7, 1987) was an American science fiction fan, author, editor, and writing instructor.wikipedia
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Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSF
Terry Gene Carr (February 19, 1937 – April 7, 1987) was an American science fiction fan, author, editor, and writing instructor.
By the 1970s, critics within the field such as Knight and Terry Carr were using sci-fi to distinguish hack-work from serious science fiction.

Ace Science Fiction Specials

Ace Special
He first worked at Ace Books, establishing the Ace Science Fiction Specials series which published, among other novels, The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin and Rite of Passage by Alexei Panshin.
Terry Carr edited the first and third series, taking the "TV special" concept and adapting it to paperback marketing.

Ace Books

AceAce Science FictionAce Double
He first worked at Ace Books, establishing the Ace Science Fiction Specials series which published, among other novels, The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin and Rite of Passage by Alexei Panshin.
Two prominent editors, Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, left in 1971, and in 1972 Ace was sold to Grosset & Dunlap.

44th World Science Fiction Convention

ConFederation198644th Convention
He was nominated five times for Hugos for Best Fanzine (1959–1961, 1967–1968), winning in 1959, was nominated three times for Best Fan Writer (1971–1973), winning in 1973, and was Fan Guest of Honor at ConFederation in 1986.
The Guests of Honor were author Ray Bradbury (pro) and writer Terry Carr (fan).

Hugo Award for Best Fanzine

Best FanzineBest Amateur MagazineHugo Award
He was nominated five times for Hugos for Best Fanzine (1959–1961, 1967–1968), winning in 1959, was nominated three times for Best Fan Writer (1971–1973), winning in 1973, and was Fan Guest of Honor at ConFederation in 1986.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year

seriesBest Science Fiction of the Year
He edited an original story anthology series called Universe, and a popular series of The Best Science Fiction of the Year anthologies that ran from 1972 until his death in 1987.
The Best Science Fiction of the Year was a series of annual paperback anthologies edited by Terry Carr.

Carl Brandon Society

Carl Brandon Society Parallax AwardCarl Brandon Parallax AwardCarl Brandon
(He was one of the two fans responsible for the hoax fan 'Carl Brandon' after whom the Carl Brandon Society takes its name.) Despite a long career as a science fiction professional, he continued to participate as a fan until his death.
It was named after "Carl Brandon", a fictional black fan writer created in the mid-1950s by Terry Carr and Pete Graham.

Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

Best Professional EditorBest Professional Editor, Long FormBest Editor
He was nominated for the Hugo for Best Editor thirteen times (1973–1975, 1977–1979, 1981–1987), winning twice (1985 and 1987).

Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer

Best Fan WriterFan Writerfan writing
He was nominated five times for Hugos for Best Fanzine (1959–1961, 1967–1968), winning in 1959, was nominated three times for Best Fan Writer (1971–1973), winning in 1973, and was Fan Guest of Honor at ConFederation in 1986.

Neuromancer

1984 novel of the same namecyber-cowboyMatrix (''Neuromancer'')
William Gibson mentions Carr in the introduction to the 20th Anniversary Edition of the book: "Having been talked into signing a contract (by the late Terry Carr, without whom there would certainly be no Neuromancer) . . ."
Neuromancer was commissioned by Terry Carr for the second series of Ace Science Fiction Specials, which was intended to feature debut novels exclusively.

Science fiction fandom

fanscience fiction fanscience fiction fans
Terry Gene Carr (February 19, 1937 – April 7, 1987) was an American science fiction fan, author, editor, and writing instructor.

William Gibson

GibsonGeorge Wythe High SchoolGibson, William
Terry Carr commissioned a first novel from William Gibson for the second series of Ace Science Fiction Specials, shortly after the Denver WorldCon, 1981.
Neuromancer was commissioned by Terry Carr for the second series of Ace Science Fiction Specials, which was intended to exclusively feature debut novels.

Ted White (author)

Ted White
Invasion From 2500 (1964, with Ted White using the joint pseudonym Norman Edwards)
In addition to books and stories written under his own name, he has also co-authored novels with Dave van Arnam as Ron Archer, and with Terry Carr as Norman Edwards.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1966

World's Best Science Fiction: 1966 (1966 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1966 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the second volume in a series of seven.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1965

World's Best Science Fiction: 1965 (1965 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1965 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the first volume in a series of seven.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1968

World's Best Science Fiction: 1968 (1968 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1968 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the fourth volume in a series of seven.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1967

World's Best Science Fiction: 1967 (1967 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1967 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the third volume in a series of seven.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1969

World's Best Science Fiction: 1969 (1969 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1969 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the fifth volume in a series of seven.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1970

World's Best Science Fiction: 1970 (1970 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1970 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the sixth volume in a series of seven.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 1

The Best Science Fiction of the Year
The Best Science Fiction of the Year (1972)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year 1 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the initial volume in a series of sixteen.

World's Best Science Fiction: 1971

World's Best Science Fiction: 1971 (1971 with Donald A. Wollheim)
World's Best Science Fiction: 1971 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Donald A. Wollheim and Terry Carr, the seventh volume in a series of seven.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 2

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #2
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #2 (1973)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #2 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by American writer Terry Carr, the second volume in a series of sixteen.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 3

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #3
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #3 (1974)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #3 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the third volume in a series of sixteen.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 4

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #4
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #4 (1975)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #4 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the fourth volume in a series of sixteen.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 5

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #5
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #5 (1976)
The Best Science Fiction of the Year #5 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the fifth volume in a series of sixteen.