Terry Riley

RileyTerry
Terrence Mitchell Riley (born June 24, 1935) is an American composer and performing musician associated with the minimalist school of 20th century music, of which he was a pioneer.wikipedia
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Minimal music

minimalistminimalismminimal
Terrence Mitchell Riley (born June 24, 1935) is an American composer and performing musician associated with the minimalist school of 20th century music, of which he was a pioneer.
In the Western art music tradition, the American composers La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and Philip Glass are credited with being among the first to develop compositional techniques that exploit a minimal approach.

In C

In C Malipiece of the same name
He is best known for works such as his 1964 composition In C and 1969 album A Rainbow in Curved Air, both considered landmarks of minimalism and important influences on experimental, electronic, and rock music.
In C is a musical piece composed by Terry Riley in 1964 for an indefinite number of performers.

A Rainbow in Curved Air

He is best known for works such as his 1964 composition In C and 1969 album A Rainbow in Curved Air, both considered landmarks of minimalism and important influences on experimental, electronic, and rock music.
A Rainbow in Curved Air is the third album by experimental music artist and keyboard virtuoso Terry Riley.

Steve Reich

ReichStephen Reich
He was involved in the experimental San Francisco Tape Music Center, working with Morton Subotnick, Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, and Ramon Sender.
Stephen Michael Reich ( born October 3, 1936) is an American composer who, along with La Monte Young, Terry Riley, and Philip Glass, pioneered minimal music in the mid to late 1960s.

20th-century music

20th century20th century music20th-century
Terrence Mitchell Riley (born June 24, 1935) is an American composer and performing musician associated with the minimalist school of 20th century music, of which he was a pioneer.
In the second half of the century, prominent composers employing microtonality included Easley Blackwood, Jr., Wendy Carlos, Adriaan Fokker, Terry Riley, Ezra Sims, Karlheinz Stockhausen, La Monte Young, and Iannis Xenakis.

Experimental music

experimentalavant-gardeexperimentalism
He is best known for works such as his 1964 composition In C and 1969 album A Rainbow in Curved Air, both considered landmarks of minimalism and important influences on experimental, electronic, and rock music.
Composer and critic Michael Nyman starts from Cage's definition, and develops the term "experimental" also to describe the work of other American composers (Christian Wolff, Earle Brown, Meredith Monk, Malcolm Goldstein, Morton Feldman, Terry Riley, La Monte Young, Philip Glass, Steve Reich, etc.), as well as composers such as Gavin Bryars, John Cale, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Cornelius Cardew, John Tilbury, Frederic Rzewski, and Keith Rowe.

La Monte Young

LaMonte YoungYoung
His most influential teacher, however, was Pandit Pran Nath (1918–1996), a master of Indian classical voice who also taught La Monte Young, Marian Zazeela, and Michael Harrison.
He has engaged in musical and multimedia collaborations with a wide range of artists, including Tony Conrad, Pandit Pran Nath, John Cale, Terry Riley, and multimedia artist Marian Zazeela, with whom he developed the Dream House sound and light environment.

Robert Erickson

RobertRobert Carl Erickson
Born in Colfax, California in 1935, Riley studied at Shasta College, San Francisco State University, and the San Francisco Conservatory before graduating with an MA in composition at the University of California, Berkeley, studying with Seymour Shifrin and Robert Erickson.
He influenced notable students Morton Subotnick, Pauline Oliveros, Terry Riley, and Paul Dresher.

Pauline Oliveros

Deep Listening
He was involved in the experimental San Francisco Tape Music Center, working with Morton Subotnick, Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, and Ramon Sender. Riley's collaborators have included the Rova Saxophone Quartet, Pauline Oliveros, the ARTE Quartett, and, as mentioned, the Kronos Quartet.
This is also where she met artists Terry Riley, Stuart Dempster and Loren Rush.

San Francisco Tape Music Center

SonicsTape Music Center
He was involved in the experimental San Francisco Tape Music Center, working with Morton Subotnick, Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, and Ramon Sender.
Other composers involved include Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and later William Maginnis and Tony Martin.

Electronic music

electronicelectronic musicianelectro
He is best known for works such as his 1964 composition In C and 1969 album A Rainbow in Curved Air, both considered landmarks of minimalism and important influences on experimental, electronic, and rock music.
The intense activity occurring at CPEMC and elsewhere inspired the establishment of the San Francisco Tape Music Center in 1963 by Morton Subotnick, with additional members Pauline Oliveros, Ramon Sender, Anthony Martin, and Terry Riley.

Piano bar

piano loungebar pianistclub pianist
Throughout the 1960s he also traveled frequently in Europe, taking in musical influences and supporting himself by playing in piano bars.
The American minimalist composer Terry Riley, who worked as a cocktail pianist when younger, later offered this "religious" view of the profession:

Marian Zazeela

Mariana Zazeela
His most influential teacher, however, was Pandit Pran Nath (1918–1996), a master of Indian classical voice who also taught La Monte Young, Marian Zazeela, and Michael Harrison.
During a period of rapid growth in the early 60s, Zazeela not only joined Young's musical group Theatre of Eternal Music as vocalist (which also included, at various times photographer Billy Name, minimalist musician Terry Riley, musician John Cale, video artist and musician Tony Conrad, and poet and musician Angus MacLise), but also produced for them light shows (among the earliest in the form) which may have inspired Andy Warhol and were contemporaneous to the early work of better-known light-artist Dan Flavin.

Gyan Riley

Gyan
He has three children: one daughter, Colleen, and two sons, Gyan, who is a guitarist, and Shahn.
He is a son of minimalist composer Terry Riley.

Tape loop

tape loopsloopstapes
In the 1950s Riley was already working with tape loops, a technology still in its infancy at the time; he would later, with the help of a sound engineer, create what he called a "time-lag accumulator".
Originating in the 1940s with the work of Pierre Schaeffer, they were used among contemporary composers of 1950s and 1960s, such as Steve Reich, Terry Riley, and Karlheinz Stockhausen, who used them to create phase patterns, rhythms, textures, and timbres.

Kronos Quartet

David HarringtonThe Kronos QuartetJeffrey Zeigler
Riley began his long-lasting association with the Kronos Quartet when he met their founder David Harrington while at Mills.
They have worked with many minimalist composers including John Adams, Arvo Pärt, George Crumb, Henryk Górecki, Steve Reich, Roberto Paci Dalò, Philip Glass, Terry Riley, and Kevin Volans; collaborators hail from a diversity of countries – Kaija Saariaho from Finland, Pēteris Vasks from Latvia, Franghiz Ali-Zadeh from Azerbaijan, Homayun Sakhi from Afghanistan, Victoria Vita Polevá from Ukraine and Fernando Otero, Astor Piazzolla, and Osvaldo Golijov from Argentina.

Angus MacLise

In New York City in the mid-1960s he played with his longtime friend La Monte Young, as well as with John Cale and tabla player Angus MacLise, who were founding members of The Velvet Underground.
MacLise was a member of La Monte Young's Theatre of Eternal Music, with John Cale, Tony Conrad, Marian Zazeela and sometimes Terry Riley.

Ramon Sender

Ramón SenderRamón Sender Barayón
He was involved in the experimental San Francisco Tape Music Center, working with Morton Subotnick, Steve Reich, Pauline Oliveros, and Ramon Sender.
Sender co-founded the San Francisco Tape Music Center in 1962 with Morton Subotnick and also collaborated with composers and visual artists including Pauline Oliveros, Tony Martin, Joseph Byrd, Terry Riley, William Maginnis, and many others until 1966 when the Center was incorporated into Mills College.

Baba O'Riley

Baba O' RileyBaba O'ReillyWasted (Baba O'Riley)
These include Pete Townshend's organ parts on The Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again" and "Baba O'Riley", the latter named in tribute to Riley as well as to Meher Baba.
The song's title is a combination of the names of two of Townshend's philosophical and musical influences: Meher Baba and Terry Riley.

Mills College

Mills SeminaryCenter for Contemporary MusicCyclones
In 1971 he joined the Mills College faculty to teach Indian classical music.
Terry Riley taught at Mills starting in the early 1970s.

Shasta College

Shasta
Born in Colfax, California in 1935, Riley studied at Shasta College, San Francisco State University, and the San Francisco Conservatory before graduating with an MA in composition at the University of California, Berkeley, studying with Seymour Shifrin and Robert Erickson.

All Tomorrow's Parties

All Tomorrows PartiesAlle Morgens PartiesATP
Riley is credited as inspiring Cale's keyboard part on Lou Reed's composition "All Tomorrow's Parties", which was sung by German actress Nico and included on the album The Velvet Underground and Nico, recorded in 1966.
The repetitive keyboard part was inspired by the style of his friend Terry Riley, with whom Cale had played in La Monte Young's mid 1960s group in New York City.

ARTE Quartett

Riley's collaborators have included the Rova Saxophone Quartet, Pauline Oliveros, the ARTE Quartett, and, as mentioned, the Kronos Quartet.
ARTE Quartett has performed concerts with Urs Leimgruber, Hans Feigenwinter, Terry Riley, Michael Riessler, Tim Berne, Fred Frith, Nick Didkovsky, Pierre Favre, Lucas Niggli and Rabih Abou-Khalil.

Pete Townshend

TownshendPetePete Townsend
These include Pete Townshend's organ parts on The Who's "Won't Get Fooled Again" and "Baba O'Riley", the latter named in tribute to Riley as well as to Meher Baba.
"Baba O'Riley" in particular was written as Townshend's ode to his two heroes at the time, Meher Baba and composer Terry Riley.

John Cale

CaleJohn Cale & BandJohn Cale’s
In New York City in the mid-1960s he played with his longtime friend La Monte Young, as well as with John Cale and tabla player Angus MacLise, who were founding members of The Velvet Underground.
The more experimental Church of Anthrax (a collaboration with minimal music pioneer Terry Riley) followed in February 1971, although it was actually recorded nearly a year prior to its release.