Tetragrammaton

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts
Transcription of the divine name as ΙΑΩ in the 1st-century BCE Septuagint manuscript 4Q120
The Mesha Stele bears the earliest known reference (840 BCE) to the Israelite god Yahweh.
YHWH in one of the Lachish letters
Tetragrammaton written in paleo-Hebrew script on Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever
Petrus Alphonsi's early 12th-century Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, rendering the name as "IEVE", which in contemporary letters is "IEUE".
Tetragrammaton at the Fifth Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, France.
A tetractys of the letters of the Tetragrammaton adds up to 72 by gematria.
Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772
The Tetragrammaton as represented in stained glass in an 1868 Episcopal Church in Iowa
The Tetragrammaton on the Tympanum of the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. Louis, King of France in Missouri

Four-letter Hebrew theonym , the name of God in Judaism and Christianity.

- Tetragrammaton
The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts

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Samaritans

Ethnoreligious group who originate from the ancient Israelites.

Ethnoreligious group who originate from the ancient Israelites.

Foreigners eaten by lions in Samaria, illustration by Gustave Doré from the 1866 La Sainte Bible, The Holy Bible
Ancient inscription in Samaritan Hebrew. From a photo c. 1900 by the Palestine Exploration Fund.
Mosaic from Samaritan synagogue (Israel Museum)
Samaritan worship centre on Mount Gerizim. From a photo c. 1900 by the Palestine Exploration Fund.
Yitzhaq ben Amram ben Shalma ben Tabia, the High Priest of the Samaritans, Nablus, c. 1920.
Interior of the Synagogue of the Samaritans in Nablus, c. 1920.
Sofi Tsedaka, an Israeli actress from the Samaritan community
During the entire week following the Feast of the Passover, the Samaritans remain encamped on Mount Gerizim. On the last day of the encampment, they begin at dawn a pilgrimage to the crest of the sacred mount. Before setting forth on this pilgrimage, however, the men spread their cloths and repeat the creed and the story of the Creation in silence, after which, in loud voice they read the Book of Genesis and the first quarter of the Book of Exodus, ending with the story of the Passover and the flight from Egypt
— John D. Whiting
 The National Geographic Magazine, Jan 1920
A Samaritan and the Samaritan Torah
The current Samaritan High Priest: "Aabed El Ben Asher Ben Matzliach", 133rd generation since Elazar the Son of Aaron The Priest, from the line of Ithamar. In priestly office 2013-present.
Samaritans celebrating Passover on Mount Gerizim in the West Bank
Samaritans pray before the Holy Rock on Mount Gerizim
Ruins on Mount Gerizim c. 1880.
The Samaritan mezuzah engraved above the front door
Samaritans, from a photo c. 1900 by the Palestine Exploration Fund.
The Samaritan, engraving, c, by Ephraim Moses Lilien. 1920
Sukkot on Mount Gerizim
Entrance to a modern Samaritan synagogue in the city of Holon, Israel

There is one God, YHWH or in Samaritan language "Shehmaa", the same God recognized by the Hebrew prophets.

Shasu prisoner as depicted in Ramesses III's reliefs at Madinat Habu

Shasu

The Shasu (from Egyptian šꜣsw, probably pronounced Shaswe ) were Semitic-speaking cattle nomads in the Southern Levant from the late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age or the Third Intermediate Period of Egypt.

The Shasu (from Egyptian šꜣsw, probably pronounced Shaswe ) were Semitic-speaking cattle nomads in the Southern Levant from the late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age or the Third Intermediate Period of Egypt.

Shasu prisoner as depicted in Ramesses III's reliefs at Madinat Habu
Egyptians beating Shasu spies (detail from the Battle of Kadesh wall-carving)

Some scholars link the Israelites and YHWH with the Shasu.

Plato, one of the first philosophers to discuss ideas in detail. Aristotle claims that many of Plato's views were Pythagorean in origin.

Ineffability

Concerned with ideas that cannot or should not be expressed in spoken words , often being in the form of a taboo or incomprehensible term.

Concerned with ideas that cannot or should not be expressed in spoken words , often being in the form of a taboo or incomprehensible term.

Plato, one of the first philosophers to discuss ideas in detail. Aristotle claims that many of Plato's views were Pythagorean in origin.

An example is the name of God in Judaism, written as YHWH but substituted with Adonai ("the Lord") or HaShem ("the name") when reading.

Traditional Tomb of Simon the Just, Jerusalem

Simeon the Just

Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period.

Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period.

Traditional Tomb of Simon the Just, Jerusalem
Traditional Tomb of Simeon the Just, Jewish Encyclopedia (1906—1913)

After Simeon's death men ceased to utter the Tetragrammaton aloud.

Shem HaMephorash

Shem HaM'phorash (Hebrew: שם המפורש, also Shem ha-Mephorash), meaning "the explicit name," is originally a Tannaitic term describing the Tetragrammaton.

Lower part of col. 18 (according to E. Tov) of the Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever (8HevXII gr). The arrow points at the divine name in paleo-Hebrew script

Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever

Greek manuscript of a revision of the Septuagint dated to the 1st century CE.

Greek manuscript of a revision of the Septuagint dated to the 1st century CE.

Lower part of col. 18 (according to E. Tov) of the Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever (8HevXII gr). The arrow points at the divine name in paleo-Hebrew script
Col. B1–2 (according to E. Tov) of the Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever (8HevXII gr).

Clearly Jewish manuscripts of Greek translations of the Old Testament (Septuagint, Proto-Masoretic, kaige, the translations of Aquila of Sinope, Symmachus the Ebionite, Theodotion and the Hexapla) differ from clearly Christian manuscripts in not using Kύριος or the nomina sacra and (with a horizontal line above the contracted words) to represent the Tetragrammaton.

Ace of Wands from the Rider–Waite tarot deck, associated with Atziluth in western occultism

Atziluth

Highest of four worlds in which exists the Kabbalistic Tree of Life.

Highest of four worlds in which exists the Kabbalistic Tree of Life.

Ace of Wands from the Rider–Waite tarot deck, associated with Atziluth in western occultism

The letter yud י in the Tetragrammaton

Thirteen Attributes of Mercy

The Thirteen Attributes of Mercy (י״ג מִידּוֹת) or Shelosh-'Esreh Middot HaRakhamim (transliterated from the Hebrew: שְׁלוֹשׁ־עֶשְׂרֵה מִידּוֹת הַרַחֲמִים) as enumerated in the Book of Exodus are the Divine Attributes with which, according to Judaism, God governs the world.

The Thirteen Attributes of Mercy (י״ג מִידּוֹת) or Shelosh-'Esreh Middot HaRakhamim (transliterated from the Hebrew: שְׁלוֹשׁ־עֶשְׂרֵה מִידּוֹת הַרַחֲמִים) as enumerated in the Book of Exodus are the Divine Attributes with which, according to Judaism, God governs the world.

1) יְהוָה YHVH: compassion before a person sins;

Beri'ah

Second of the four celestial worlds in the Tree of Life of the Kabbalah, intermediate between the World of Emanation (Atziluth) and the World of Formation (Yetzirah), the third world, that of the angels.

Second of the four celestial worlds in the Tree of Life of the Kabbalah, intermediate between the World of Emanation (Atziluth) and the World of Formation (Yetzirah), the third world, that of the angels.

The first of the two letter hei's ה in the Tetragrammaton

Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.

Assiah

Last of the four spiritual worlds of the Kabbalah —Atziluth, Beriah, Yetzirah, 'Asiyah— based on the passage in.

Last of the four spiritual worlds of the Kabbalah —Atziluth, Beriah, Yetzirah, 'Asiyah— based on the passage in.

Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.

The final letter hei ה in the Tetragrammaton