Tetragrammaton

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts
Transcription of the divine name as ΙΑΩ in the 1st-century BCE Septuagint manuscript 4Q120
The Mesha Stele bears the earliest known reference (840 BCE) to the Israelite god Yahweh.
YHWH in one of the Lachish letters
Tetragrammaton written in paleo-Hebrew script on Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever
Petrus Alphonsi's early 12th-century Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, rendering the name as "IEVE", which in contemporary letters is "IEUE".
Tetragrammaton at the Fifth Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, France.
A tetractys of the letters of the Tetragrammaton adds up to 72 by gematria.
Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772
The Tetragrammaton as represented in stained glass in an 1868 Episcopal Church in Iowa
The Tetragrammaton on the Tympanum of the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. Louis, King of France in Missouri

Four-letter Hebrew theonym , the name of God in Judaism and Christianity.

- Tetragrammaton
The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts

46 related topics

Alpha

Plato, one of the first philosophers to discuss ideas in detail. Aristotle claims that many of Plato's views were Pythagorean in origin.

Ineffability

Concerned with ideas that cannot or should not be expressed in spoken words , often being in the form of a taboo or incomprehensible term.

Concerned with ideas that cannot or should not be expressed in spoken words , often being in the form of a taboo or incomprehensible term.

Plato, one of the first philosophers to discuss ideas in detail. Aristotle claims that many of Plato's views were Pythagorean in origin.

An example is the name of God in Judaism, written as YHWH but substituted with Adonai ("the Lord") or HaShem ("the name") when reading.

Sufi teacher Mansur Al-Hallaj was executed in Baghdad amid political intrigue and charges of blasphemy in 922.

Blasphemy

Insult that shows contempt, disrespect or lack of reverence concerning a deity, an object considered sacred or something considered inviolable.

Insult that shows contempt, disrespect or lack of reverence concerning a deity, an object considered sacred or something considered inviolable.

Sufi teacher Mansur Al-Hallaj was executed in Baghdad amid political intrigue and charges of blasphemy in 922.
Nathan confronts David over his sex scandal with Bathsheba the wife of Uriah the Hittite, saying "by this deed you have given occasion to the enemies of the LORD to blaspheme" (2 Samuel 12:14)

In Jewish law the only form of blasphemy which is punishable by death is blaspheming the name of the Lord.

Traditional Tomb of Simon the Just, Jerusalem

Simeon the Just

Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period.

Jewish High Priest during the Second Temple period.

Traditional Tomb of Simon the Just, Jerusalem
Traditional Tomb of Simeon the Just, Jewish Encyclopedia (1906—1913)

After Simeon's death men ceased to utter the Tetragrammaton aloud.

Thirteen Attributes of Mercy

The Thirteen Attributes of Mercy (י״ג מִידּוֹת) or Shelosh-'Esreh Middot HaRakhamim (transliterated from the Hebrew: שְׁלוֹשׁ־עֶשְׂרֵה מִידּוֹת הַרַחֲמִים) as enumerated in the Book of Exodus are the Divine Attributes with which, according to Judaism, God governs the world.

The Thirteen Attributes of Mercy (י״ג מִידּוֹת) or Shelosh-'Esreh Middot HaRakhamim (transliterated from the Hebrew: שְׁלוֹשׁ־עֶשְׂרֵה מִידּוֹת הַרַחֲמִים) as enumerated in the Book of Exodus are the Divine Attributes with which, according to Judaism, God governs the world.

1) יְהוָה YHVH: compassion before a person sins;

Papyrus (P. BM EA 10591 recto column IX, beginning of lines 13–17)

Jewish magical papyri

Jewish magical papyri are a subclass of papyri with specific Jewish magical uses, and which shed light on popular belief during the late Second Temple Period and after in Late Antiquity.

Jewish magical papyri are a subclass of papyri with specific Jewish magical uses, and which shed light on popular belief during the late Second Temple Period and after in Late Antiquity.

Papyrus (P. BM EA 10591 recto column IX, beginning of lines 13–17)

Some "Jewish magical papyri" may not themselves be Jewish but syncretic invocations of the Tetragrammaton by non-Jews.

Papyrus Fouad 266 fragment of the Greek text of Deuteronomy 31:28 - 32:7 with the Hebrew tetragrammaton יהוה inserted in smaller letters in the lower part of the middle column

Papyrus Fouad 266

The Papyrus Fouad 266 (three fragments listed as Rahlfs 847, 848 and 942) are fragments, part of a papyrus manuscript in scroll form containing the Greek translation, known as the Septuagint, of the Pentateuch.

The Papyrus Fouad 266 (three fragments listed as Rahlfs 847, 848 and 942) are fragments, part of a papyrus manuscript in scroll form containing the Greek translation, known as the Septuagint, of the Pentateuch.

Papyrus Fouad 266 fragment of the Greek text of Deuteronomy 31:28 - 32:7 with the Hebrew tetragrammaton יהוה inserted in smaller letters in the lower part of the middle column

It is the oldest manuscript that, in the midst of the Greek text, uses the Hebrew Tetragrammaton in Aramaic "square" or Ashuri script,.

Page of the codex with text of Ezek 5:12–17

Codex Marchalianus

6th-century Greek manuscript copy of the Greek version of the Hebrew Bible known as the Septuagint.

6th-century Greek manuscript copy of the Greek version of the Hebrew Bible known as the Septuagint.

Page of the codex with text of Ezek 5:12–17
Folio 283 of the codex with text of Ezek 1:28–2:6
Daniel 1–9 in Tischendorf's facsimile edition (1869)

In their comment on the two verses Ezekiel 1:2 and 11:1, they use Ιαω, a phonetic transliteration into Greek letters of Hebrew יהוה, as an indirect reference to the Tetragrammaton.

LXXP.Oxy.VII.1007

Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1007

Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1007 (also known as LXXP.Oxy.VII.1007; '''P.Oxy.

Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1007 (also known as LXXP.Oxy.VII.1007; '''P.Oxy.

LXXP.Oxy.VII.1007

The fragment is difficult to identify as either Christian or Jewish, as on the barely legible recto side (in Gen 2:18) it contains the nomen sacrum ΘΣ (characteristic of Christian manuscripts) and the name of God written in Hebrew with a double Yodh (characteristic of Jewish manuscripts).

Presence of the name YHWH in the Ambrosiano O39 sup.

Ambrosiano O 39 sup.

Manuscript of the Hexapla of Origen dated to the late ninth century C.E. written in a codex form.

Manuscript of the Hexapla of Origen dated to the late ninth century C.E. written in a codex form.

Presence of the name YHWH in the Ambrosiano O39 sup.

The tetragrammaton occur in square Hebrew characters in all the five columns in the following places within the Book of Psalms: 18:30, 31, 41, 46; 28:6,7,8; 29:1 (x2), 2 (x2), 3 (x2); 30:1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 10, 12; 31:1, 5, 6, 9, 21, 23 (x2), 24; 32:10, 11; 35:1, 22, 24, 27; 36:5; 46:7, 8, 11; 89:49 (in the columns 1, 2 and 4), 51, 52.

David Composing the Psalms, Paris Psalter, 10th century

Papyrus Vindobonensis Greek 39777

Fragment of a Greek manuscript of the Psalms of the translation of Symmachus.

Fragment of a Greek manuscript of the Psalms of the translation of Symmachus.

David Composing the Psalms, Paris Psalter, 10th century

The papyrus contains the tetragrammaton written in archaic Hebrew characters in Ps 69:13, 30 and 31.