Tetragrammaton

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts
Transcription of the divine name as ΙΑΩ in the 1st-century BCE Septuagint manuscript 4Q120
The Mesha Stele bears the earliest known reference (840 BCE) to the Israelite god Yahweh.
YHWH in one of the Lachish letters
Tetragrammaton written in paleo-Hebrew script on Greek Minor Prophets Scroll from Nahal Hever
Petrus Alphonsi's early 12th-century Tetragrammaton-Trinity diagram, rendering the name as "IEVE", which in contemporary letters is "IEUE".
Tetragrammaton at the Fifth Chapel of the Palace of Versailles, France.
A tetractys of the letters of the Tetragrammaton adds up to 72 by gematria.
Tetragrammaton by Francisco Goya: "The Name of God", YHWH in triangle, detail from fresco Adoration of the Name of God, 1772
The Tetragrammaton as represented in stained glass in an 1868 Episcopal Church in Iowa
The Tetragrammaton on the Tympanum of the Roman Catholic Basilica of St. Louis, King of France in Missouri

Four-letter Hebrew theonym , the name of God in Judaism and Christianity.

- Tetragrammaton

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Miketz

Tenth weekly Torah portion (, parashah) in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading.

Joseph Interprets the Dream of Pharaoh (19th Century painting by Jean-Adrien Guignet)
Joseph Interprets Pharaoh's Dream (fresco circa 1816–1817 by Peter von Cornelius)
Joseph in Egypt (painting circa 1517–1518 by Pontormo)
Jacob Refusing To Let Benjamin Go to Egypt (1829 painting by Adolphe Rogers)
Joseph's Steward Finds the Cup in Benjamin's Sack (1627 painting by Claes Corneliszoon Moeyaert)
Philo
Pharaoh's Dreams (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Pharaoh's Dream (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
Pharaoh called the wisest magicians and thinkers of Egypt (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
Joseph Interprets Pharaoh's Dream (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph Interprets Pharaoh's Dream (woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld from the 1860 Die Bibel in Bildern)
"God is trying to tell you the same thing in both dreams", explained Joseph (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
Pharaoh said, "Who could be better than Joseph?" (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
Joseph Is Ruler Over All Egypt (woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld from the 1860 Die Bibel in Bildern)
The Glory of Joseph (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph's Brothers Found the Money (illustration from the 1897 Bible Pictures and What They Teach Us by Charles Foster)
Jacob unhappily agreed to let them take Benjamin (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
The brothers were seated in order of age. (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
The Cup Found (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph Converses with Judah, His Brother (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Judah asked, "How can we prove our innocence?" (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
The title page of the Zohar
Naḥmanides
Maimonides
Rashi
Kugel
Malbim
Diagram of the documentary hypothesis
Solomon and the Two Women (woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld from the 1860 Die Bibel in Bildern)
The Judgment of Solomon (late 18th-century painting by Giuseppe Cades)
Gilgamesh Tablet

The Jahwist's version employed the Tetragrammaton and the name "Israel".

Vayigash

Eleventh weekly Torah portion (, parashah) in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading.

Joseph Recognized by His Brothers (1863 painting by Léon Pierre Urbain Bourgeois)
Joseph identified by his brothers (1789 painting by Charles Thévenin)
Joseph Forgives His Brothers (illustration from a Bible card published 1907 by the Providence Lithograph Company)
Jacob Comes Into Egypt (woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld from the 1860 Die Bibel in Bildern)
Joseph and His Brethren Welcomed by Pharaoh (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph Overseer of the Pharaohs Granaries (1874 painting by Lawrence Alma-Tadema)
Philo
Joseph Converses with Judah, His Brother (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph Makes Himself Known to His Brethren (engraving by Gustave Doré from the 1865 La Sainte Bible)
Joseph Reveals His Identity (painting circa 1816–1817 by Peter von Cornelius)
Joseph Makes Himself Known to His Brethren (illustration from the 1728 Figures de la Bible by Giuseppe il Nutritore)
Joseph Reveals Himself to His Brothers (woodcut by Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld from the 1860 Die Bibel in Bildern)
Judah said, "Let us sell him to the Ishmaelites." (1984 illustration by Jim Padgett, courtesy of Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing)
Burying the Body of Joseph (illustration from the 1890 Holman Bible)
Joseph Kisses Jacob (illustration from the 1897 Bible Pictures and What They Teach Us by Charles Foster)
He fell upon his neck and wept on his neck a good while. (illustration by Owen Jones from the 1869 "The History of Joseph and His Brethren")
Joseph Presents His Father and Brothers to the Pharaoh (1515 painting by Francesco Granacci)
Jacob blessed Pharaoh. (illustration by Owen Jones from the 1869 "The History of Joseph and His Brethren")
Joseph Dwells in Egypt (watercolor circa 1896–1902 by James Tissot)
Joseph was the governor over the land. (illustration by Owen Jones from the 1869 "The History of Joseph and His Brethren")
Naḥmanides
Kugel
Franklin
Plaut
Shlomo Ganzfried, editor of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch
A page from a 14th-century German Haggadah
Kingdom of Judah (light green) and Kingdom of Israel (dark green) circa 830 B.C.E.
Talmud
Rashi
Zohar
Eliot
Luzzatto
Mann
Kass
Plaut
Finkelstein
Sacks
Herzfeld
Horn
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The Jahwist’s version employed the Tetragrammaton and the name “Israel.” In that version, Judah persuaded his brothers not to kill Joseph but sell him instead to Ishmaelites, who disposed of him in Egypt to an unnamed official.

Jean Astruc

Professor of medicine in France at Montpellier and Paris, who wrote the first great treatise on syphilis and venereal diseases, and also, with a small anonymously published book, played a fundamental part in the origins of critical textual analysis of works of the Bible.

Jean Astruc

Using methods already well established in the study of the Classics for sifting and assessing differing manuscripts, he drew up parallel columns and assigned verses to each of them according to what he had noted as the defining features of the text of Genesis: whether a verse used the term "YHWH" (Yahweh) or the term "Elohim" (God) referring to God and whether it had a doublet (another telling of the same incident, as the two accounts of the creation of man and the two accounts of Sarah being taken by a foreign king).

Apophatic theology

Form of theological thinking and religious practice which attempts to approach God, the Divine, by negation, to speak only in terms of what may not be said about the perfect goodness that is God.

Plato Silanion Musei Capitolini MC1377
Plotinus
Engraving of Otto van Veen (1660), who negatively describes God as Quod oculus non vidit, nec auris audivit (Vulgate), "What no eye has seen, nor ear heard" (1 Corinthians )
Filippo Lippi, Vision of St. Augustine, 1465, tempera, Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg
In The Creation of Adam painted by Michelangelo (c. 1512), the two index fingers are separated by a small gap [3/4 in]: some scholars think that it represents the unattainability of divine perfection by man
Herman Dooyeweerd
Maimonides
Adi Shankara, 788-820 CE

Luz notes that "Marinus' Samaritan origins with its Abrahamic notion of a single ineffable Name of God should also have been in many ways compatible with the school's ineffable and apophatic divine principle."

Abijah of Judah

Abijam (Abiam) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the fourth king of the House of David and the second of the Kingdom of Judah.

Abijam from Guillaume Rouillé's Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum, 1553

Thus the unconditional covenant blessing of YHWH guaranteed his promise to King David, to stabilize the Kingdom of David despite its ruler.

Ahitophel

Counselor of King David and a man greatly renowned for his sagacity.

Ahithophel hangs himself from a 14th Chronicle of the World by Rudolf vom Emns

When David again warned him of the malediction, Ahithophel counseled the king to throw a tile, with the ineffable name of God written upon it, into the cavity; whereupon the waters began to sink.

Zedekiah

The 20th and last king of Judah before the destruction of the kingdom by King Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon.

Zedekiah from Guillaume Rouillé's Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum, 1553
Nebuchadnezzar faces off against Zedekiah, who holds a plan of Jerusalem, in this Baroque-era depiction in Zwiefalten Abbey in Germany
Zedekiah's sons are slaughtered before his eyes, by Gustave Doré

His original name was Mattanyahu (מַתַּנְיָהוּ, Mattanyāhû, "Gift of God"; Μαθθανιας; Matthanias; traditional English: Mattaniah), but when Nebuchadnezzar II placed him on the throne as the successor to Jehoiachin, he changed his name to Zedekiah.

Scribe

Person who serves as a professional copyist, especially one who made copies of manuscripts before the invention of automatic printing.

Jean Miélot, a European author and scribe at work
Modern scribes with typewriters outside post office, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India, 2010
Egyptian scribe with papyrus scroll
Ancient Egyptian scribe's palette with five depressions for pigments and four styli
Cuneiform depiction
This early New Kingdom statue commemorates the scribe Minnakht ("Strength of Min") and demonstrates how ancient scribes read papyri – in a seated position on the floor with the text on their lap.
Jewish scribes at the Tomb of Ezekiel in Iraq, c. undefined 1914
Monastic scribes copying manuscripts. Miniature from the manuscript "Werken", manufactured by Jan van Ruusbroec in Bergen-op-Zoom. Published in 1480.

5) They must wipe the pen and wash their entire bodies before writing the most Holy Name of God, YHVH, every time they wrote it.

Seraiah

The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (12th century BCE to 150 BCE), Paleo-Hebrew (10th century BCE to 135 CE), and square Hebrew (3rd century BCE to present) scripts

Seraiah or Sraya (שְׂרָיָה "Soldier/Prince/Princess of/is the LORD", Standard Hebrew Səraya, Tiberian Hebrew Śərāyā) is the name of several people mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, and a name with other non-biblical uses.

Pashhur

The name of at least two priests contemporary with the prophet Jeremiah and who are mentioned in the Book of Jeremiah.

Malachi, one of the last prophets of Israel, painting by Duccio di Buoninsegna, c. 1310 (Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Siena Cathedral). “He Mashiach will turn the hearts of the parents to their children, and the hearts of the children to their parents” (Malachi 4:6)

Pashur, the son of Malchiah, was another priest, who was sent by king Zedekiah to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord regarding the impending attack of King Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon (Jeremiah 21:1).