Thai cuisine

ThaiThailandThai foodCuisine of ThailandThai restaurantThai dishThai restaurantsSiamese cuisineThai cookingThai desserts
Thai cuisine is the national cuisine of Thailand.wikipedia
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Malaysian cuisine

MalaysiaMalaysianCuisine of Malaysia
Southern Thailand, with many dishes that contain liberal amounts of coconut milk and fresh turmeric, has that in common with Indian, Malaysian, and Indonesian cuisine.
As a result of historical migrations, colonisation by foreign powers, and its geographical position within its wider home region, Malaysia's culinary style in the present day is primarily a melange of traditions from its Malay, Chinese, Indian, Indonesian and ethnic Bornean citizens, with heavy to light influences from Thai, Portuguese, Dutch, Arabian cuisines and British cuisines, to name a few.

David Thompson (chef)

David Thompson
Australian chef David Thompson, an expert on Thai food, observes that unlike many other cuisines, Thai cooking rejects simplicity and is about "the juggling of disparate elements to create a harmonious finish".
David Thompson is an Australian chef, restaurateur and cookery writer, known for his skill and expertise in Thai cuisine.

Yellow curry

The cuisines of India and Persia, brought first by traders, and later settlers from these regions, with their use of dried spices, gave rise to Thai adaptations and dishes such as kaeng kari (yellow curry) and kaeng matsaman (massaman curry).
There are other curry types in Thai cuisine, several of which are yellow.

Solanum torvum

pea eggplantturkey berryS. torvum
During the Columbian Exchange, Portuguese and Spanish ships brought new foodstuffs from the Americas including tomatoes, corn, papaya, pea eggplants, pineapple, pumpkins, culantro, cashews, and peanuts.
The green fresh fruits are edible and used in Thai cuisine, as an ingredient in certain Thai curries or raw in certain Thai chili pastes (nam phrik).

Thai curry

Thai curriescurryThai curry paste
The plain rice, sticky rice or the khanom chin (Thai rice noodles) served alongside a spicy Thai curry or stir fry, tends to counteract the spiciness.
Thai curry refers both to dishes in Thai cuisine that are made with various types of curry paste and to the pastes themselves.

Nam phrik

chili pastenam prik
Khrueang chim, considered a building block of Thai food by Chef McDang, may come in the form of a spicy chili sauce or relish called nam phrik (made of raw or cooked chilies and other ingredients, which are then mashed together), or a type of dip enriched with coconut milk called lon.
Nam phrik is a type of Thai spicy chili sauce typical of Thai cuisine.

Maria Guyomar de Pinha

These dishes were said to have been brought to Thailand in the 17th century by Maria Guyomar de Pinha, a woman of mixed Japanese-Portuguese-Bengali ancestry who was born in Ayutthaya, and became the wife of Constantine Phaulkon, a Greek adviser to King Narai.
Maria Guyomar is known in Thailand for having introduced new dessert recipes in Siamese cuisine at the Ayutthaya court.

Nam chim

Thai satay sauce
In most Thai restaurants, diners will have access to a selection of Thai sauces (nam chim) and condiments, either brought to the table by wait staff or present at the table in small containers.
It can refer to a wide variety of dipping sauces in Thai cuisine, with many of them a combination of salty, sweet, spicy and sour.

Fish sauce

patisnước mắmnam pla
Common flavors in Thai food come from garlic, galangal, coriander/cilantro, lemon grass, shallots, pepper, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and chilies.
It is used as a staple seasoning in East Asian cuisine and Southeast Asian cuisine, particularly Burma, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Khanom chin

Khanom chin is fresh rice vermicelli made from fermented rice, and eaten with spicy curries such as green chicken curry (khanom chin kaeng khiao wan kai) or with salads such as som tam.
Khanom chin (ขนมจีน, ; also spelled khanohm jeen) are fresh, thin rice noodles in Thai cuisine which are made from rice sometimes fermented for three days, boiled, and then made into noodles by extruding the resulting dough through a sieve into boiling water.

Black pepper

pepperwhite pepperpeppercorn
Common flavors in Thai food come from garlic, galangal, coriander/cilantro, lemon grass, shallots, pepper, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and chilies.
Ground white pepper is used in Chinese and Thai cuisine, but also in salads, cream sauces, light-coloured sauces, and mashed potatoes (as a substitute, because black pepper would visibly stand out).

Bird's eye chili

bird's eye chilliThai chiliThai pepper
With certain dishes, such as khao kha mu (pork trotter stewed in soy sauce and served with rice), whole Thai peppers and raw garlic are served in addition to the sour chili sauce.
It is used extensively in Thai, Malaysian, Singaporean, Lao, Khmer, Indonesian, Kerala and Vietnamese cuisines.

Isan

Northeastern Thailandnortheast Thailandnortheastern
Northern Thai cuisine shares dishes with Shan State in Burma, northern Laos, and also with Yunnan Province in China, whereas the cuisine of Isan (northeastern Thailand) is similar to that of southern Laos, and is also influenced by Khmer cuisine from Cambodia to its south, and by Vietnamese cuisine to its east.
Isan food, in which glutinous rice (ข้าวเหนียว, khao-niao) and chili peppers are prominent, is distinct from central Thai cuisine, though it is now found throughout the kingdom.

Pad thai

Phad Thaiphat Thai
They were: tom yam goong (4th), pad Thai (5th), som tam (6th), massaman curry (10th), green curry (19th), Thai fried rice (24th) and mu nam tok (36th). Stir fried noodle dishes such as pad Thai, and curry-noodle dishes such as khanom chin nam ngiao, are also eaten with a fork and spoon in the Thai fashion.
Pad thai, or phad thai ( or ; ผัดไทย, ISO: p̄hạdịthy,, 'Thai stir fry'), is a stir-fried rice noodle dish commonly served as a street food and at most restaurants in Thailand as part of the country's cuisine.

Garlic

Allium sativumgarlic clovesGarlic Production
With certain dishes, such as khao kha mu (pork trotter stewed in soy sauce and served with rice), whole Thai peppers and raw garlic are served in addition to the sour chili sauce.
Green garlic is often chopped and stir-fried or cooked in soup or hot pot in Southeast Asian (i.e. Vietnamese, Thai, Myanmar, Lao, Cambodian, Singaporean), and Chinese cookery, and is very abundant and low-priced.

Thai salads

Thai saladachatYam naem
Banana flowers are also used in Thai salads or as a vegetable ingredient for certain curries.
In Thai cuisine these are called yam, tam, lap and phla.

Oyster sauce

oysterteuk krom
Namman hoi (oyster sauce) is also of Chinese origin.
It is commonly used in Cantonese, Thai, Malay, Vietnamese and Khmer cuisine.

Indonesian cuisine

IndonesianIndonesiaCuisine of Indonesia
Southern Thailand, with many dishes that contain liberal amounts of coconut milk and fresh turmeric, has that in common with Indian, Malaysian, and Indonesian cuisine.
Indonesian peanut sauce tends to be less sweet than the Thai version, which is a hybrid adaptation.

Turmeric

Curcuma longaturmeric powderhaldi
Southern Thailand, with many dishes that contain liberal amounts of coconut milk and fresh turmeric, has that in common with Indian, Malaysian, and Indonesian cuisine.
In Thailand, fresh turmeric rhizomes are used widely in many dishes, in particular in the southern Thai cuisine, such as yellow curry and turmeric soup.

Shrimp paste

belacanterasipetis
Common flavors in Thai food come from garlic, galangal, coriander/cilantro, lemon grass, shallots, pepper, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and chilies.
Shrimp paste produced in Hong Kong and Vietnam is typically a light pinkish grey; while the type used for Burmese, Lao, Cambodian, Thai and Indonesian cooking is darker brown.

Kaffir lime

Citrus hystrixKaffir Lime Leaveslime
Common flavors in Thai food come from garlic, galangal, coriander/cilantro, lemon grass, shallots, pepper, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, fish sauce, and chilies.
The leaves are widely used in Thai and Lao cuisine (for dishes such as tom yum) and Cambodian cuisine (for the base paste "krueng").

Nam ngiao

Stir fried noodle dishes such as pad Thai, and curry-noodle dishes such as khanom chin nam ngiao, are also eaten with a fork and spoon in the Thai fashion.
The dish has become famous through the northern Thai cuisine.

Massaman curry

Goat Massaman curryKaeng matsaman
The cuisines of India and Persia, brought first by traders, and later settlers from these regions, with their use of dried spices, gave rise to Thai adaptations and dishes such as kaeng kari (yellow curry) and kaeng matsaman (massaman curry). They were: tom yam goong (4th), pad Thai (5th), som tam (6th), massaman curry (10th), green curry (19th), Thai fried rice (24th) and mu nam tok (36th).
According to Thai food expert David Thompson, as well as Thai journalist and scholar Santi Sawetwimon, the dish originated in 17th century central Thailand at the cosmopolitan court of Ayutthaya, through the Persian merchant Sheik Ahmad Qomi, from whom the noble Thai Bunnag family descends.

McDang

Chef McDangSirichalerm
Thai chef McDang characterises Thai food as demonstrating "intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor", as well as care being given to the food's appearance, smell and context.
Chef McDang, himself descended from the royal family, asserts that the difference between Thai royal cuisine and regular Thai cuisine is fiction.

Short mackerel

Rastrelliger brachysomapla thushort-bodied mackerel
"The stream is rich in fish of excellent quality and flavour, such as is found in most of the great rivers of Asia; and is especially noted for its platoo, a kind of sardine, so abundant and cheap that it forms a common seasoning to the labourer's bowl of rice."
Pla thu, known as the "fish of the nation" due to its ubiquity, is a very important fish in Thai cuisine, where it is sold in the market with the head bent downwards, which gives it a characteristic shape.