Thames Nautical Training College

HMS ''WorcesterHMS WorcesterWorcesterIncorporated Thames Nautical Training College, HMS ''WorcesterThames Nautical CollegeTraining Ship ''Worcester
The Thames Nautical Training College, as it is now called, was, for over a hundred years, situated aboard ships named HMS Worcester.wikipedia
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Cutty Sark

famous clipper ship of the same nameFerreiratea clipper
In 1938, the clipper Cutty Sark was acquired by the college and berthed alongside Worcester and during the Second World War some seamanship classes were held in the ship.
After his death, Cutty Sark was transferred to the Thames Nautical Training College, Greenhithe in 1938 where she became an auxiliary cadet training ship alongside HMS Worcester. By 1954, she had ceased to be useful as a cadet ship and was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London, for public display.

Greenhithe

Ingress
She was to find her eventual home off Greenhithe, in the Thames, in 1871, after temporary berths at Blackwall, Erith and Southend.
This led a group of London shipowners to found the Thames Nautical Training College in 1862.

HMS Worcester (1843)

HMS ''WorcesterWorcester
The British Admiralty loaned the 50-gun, 1,500-ton frigate HMS Worcester for the scheme, and in 1862 the Thames Marine Officer Training School was opened.
She was lent as a training ship in 1862 to form the Thames Marine Officer Training School (later known as the Thames Nautical Training College), with nearly £1,000 spent on her conversion.

HMS Frederick William

HMS ''Frederick WilliamFrederick WilliamHMS ''Worcester
The college expanded and the Admiralty provided the college with HMS Frederick William (originally laid down as Royal Frederick), a line-of-battle ship of 86 guns with screw propulsion.
From 1 July to 31 December 1864, she served as a Coast Guard Service Home Station, at Portland, replacing HMS Colossus. On 19 October 1876 she was renamed as Worcester, to take on a new role as a training ship at Greenhithe for the Thames Nautical Training College.

Merchant Navy (United Kingdom)

Merchant NavyBritish Merchant NavyMerchant Marine
Worcester cadets, who automatically became Cadets of the Royal Naval Reserve during their time in the ship, entered the Royal Navy and British merchant navy on leaving Worcester and many rose to the highest ranks of their profession, including those who became commodores of leading merchant fleets.
Historically a person wishing to become a captain, or master prior to about 1973, had five choices: to attend one of the three elite naval schools from the age of 12, the fixed-base HMS Conway and HMS Worcester or Pangbourne Nautical College, which would automatically lead to an apprenticeship as a seagoing cadet officer; apply to one of several training programmes elsewhere; or go to sea immediately by applying directly to a merchant shipping company at about age 17. Then there would be three years (with prior training or four years without) of seagoing experience aboard ship, in work-clothes and as mates with the deck crew, under the direction of the bo'sun cleaning bilges, chipping paint, polishing brass, cement washing freshwater tanks, and holystoning teak decks, and studying navigation and seamanship on the bridge in uniform, under the direction of an officer, before taking exams to become a second mate.

Training ship

school shiptraining vesselschoolship
School ship
Worcester

HMS Worcester

HMS ''WorcesterWorcester
HMS Worcester for other ships of the same name
HMS Worcester was the name given to the Thames Nautical Training College. It was established in 1862 aboard the fourth rate HMS Worcester. The name HMS Worcester ceased to be associated with the establishment after 1968. Ships that have been named or renamed HMS Worcester whilst serving with the establishment include:

Marine insurance

constructive total lossmaritime insurancemarine
London shipowners, marine insurance underwriters and merchants subscribed to its founding as an institution which would provide trained officers for a seagoing career.

Admiralty

Lord High AdmiralBritish Admiraltythe Admiralty
The British Admiralty loaned the 50-gun, 1,500-ton frigate HMS Worcester for the scheme, and in 1862 the Thames Marine Officer Training School was opened.

River Thames

ThamesThames Riverthe Thames
She was to find her eventual home off Greenhithe, in the Thames, in 1871, after temporary berths at Blackwall, Erith and Southend.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
In 1938, the clipper Cutty Sark was acquired by the college and berthed alongside Worcester and during the Second World War some seamanship classes were held in the ship.

Greenwich

East GreenwichGreenwich, LondonManor of East Greenwich
In 1954 the Cutty Sark left Greenhithe to be docked permanently at Greenwich, where she is docked to this day.

Foots Cray Place

Footscray-place
With the onset of war in 1939, Worcester cadets moved to Foots Cray Place near Sidcup, and the ship was handed back to the Admiralty.

Scapa Flow

ScapaScapa Flow Visitor Centre
She had previously been used as an accommodation ship at Scapa Flow.

Royal Naval Reserve

RNVRRNRRoyal Naval Volunteer Reserve
Worcester cadets, who automatically became Cadets of the Royal Naval Reserve during their time in the ship, entered the Royal Navy and British merchant navy on leaving Worcester and many rose to the highest ranks of their profession, including those who became commodores of leading merchant fleets.

Royal Navy (disambiguation)

Royal NavyRNBritish
Worcester cadets, who automatically became Cadets of the Royal Naval Reserve during their time in the ship, entered the Royal Navy and British merchant navy on leaving Worcester and many rose to the highest ranks of their profession, including those who became commodores of leading merchant fleets.

Victoria Cross

VCV.C.VCs
In the period up to 1946, two Victoria Crosses and one George Cross were awarded to former Worcester cadets.

George Cross

GCG.C.George Cross (GC)
In the period up to 1946, two Victoria Crosses and one George Cross were awarded to former Worcester cadets.

Queen Victoria

Victoriathe QueenQueen
In 1876 Queen Victoria confirmed her interest in the ship by establishing the award of an annual Gold Medal to the cadet who, in the opinion of his shipmates, was most likely to make the best officer.

HMS Conway (school ship)

HMS ''ConwayHMS ConwayConway
HMS Worcester was the London maritime interests' answer to HMS Conway which had been established in 1859 on the River Mersey as a training ship for Liverpool's burgeoning merchant fleet.

Dennis Wheatley

Denis WheatleyGregory Sallust
Soon after his expulsion Wheatley became a British Merchant Navy officer cadet on the training ship HMS Worcester.

Pangbourne College

Nautical College, PangbournePangbourne Nautical CollegePangbourne
Almost immediately after founding, the Admiralty took a keen interest, and naval uniform together with the status of cadet in the Royal Naval Reserve was awarded to every student, putting the college in line with similar schools at that time, such as HMS Worcester and HMS Conway. These last two institutions closed in 1968 and 1974 respectively as the number of young men seeking a career at sea declined, and in 1969 The Nautical College, Pangbourne became "Pangbourne College".

Michael Eavis

Athelstan Joseph Michael EavisMichael
Eavis was educated at Wells Cathedral School, followed by the Thames Nautical Training College after which he joined the Union-Castle Line, part of the British Merchant Navy, as a trainee Midshipman.

Charles Fryatt

Captain FryattFryatt caseFryatt, Charles
The younger Charles later followed his father into the merchant navy, training at HMS Worcester.