Thanatos

DeathThánatosdeath instinctTanathosThanatoicThanatos/Θάνατοςthanoticθάνατος
In Greek mythology, Thanatos (, pronounced in "Death", from θνῄσκω thnēskō "to die, be dying" ) was the personification of death.wikipedia
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Death (personification)

Grim ReaperDeathAngel of Death
In Greek mythology, Thanatos (, pronounced in "Death", from θνῄσκω thnēskō "to die, be dying" ) was the personification of death.
In Ancient Greek religion and Greek mythology, Death (Thanatos) is one of the twin sons of Nyx (night).

Mors (mythology)

MorsLetumLetus
His name is transliterated in Latin as Thanatus, but his equivalent in Roman mythology is Mors or Letum.
In ancient Roman myth and literature, Mors (also known as Letum) is the personification of death equivalent to the Greek Thánatos and the Mara (Hindu goddess).

Hypnos

Somnusgod of sleepGreek God Hypnos
The Greek poet Hesiod established in his Theogony that Thánatos is a son of Nyx (Night) and Erebos (Darkness) and twin of Hypnos (Sleep).
His brother is Thanatos ("Death").

Theogony

Hesiod's TheogonyHesiodTheogeny
The Greek poet Hesiod established in his Theogony that Thánatos is a son of Nyx (Night) and Erebos (Darkness) and twin of Hypnos (Sleep).
Meanwhile, Nyx (Night) alone produced children: Moros (Doom), Ker (Destiny), Thanatos (Death), Hypnos (Sleep), the Oneiroi (Dreams), Momus (Blame), Oizys (Pain), Hesperides (Daughters of Night), the Moirai (Fates), the Keres (Destinies), Nemesis (Retribution), Apate (Deceit), Philotes (Love), Geras (Old Age), and Eris (Discord).

Keres

KerKeres (mythology)Tenebrae
He is also occasionally specified as being exclusive to peaceful death, while the bloodthirsty Keres embodied violent death.
The Keres were daughters of Nyx, and as such the sisters of beings such as Moirai, who controlled the fate of souls and Thanatos, the god of peaceful death.

Apollo

PhoebusPythian ApolloApollo Carneius
Homer also confirmed Hypnos and Thanatos as twin brothers in his epic poem, the Iliad, where they were charged by Zeus via Apollo with the swift delivery of the slain hero Sarpedon to his homeland of Lycia.
He then gave it to Sleep (Hypnos) and Death (Thanatos).

Charon

CaronteCharon (mythology)Charos
Counted among Thanatos' siblings were other negative personifications such as Geras (Old Age), Oizys (Suffering), Moros (Doom), Apate (Deception), Momus (Blame), Eris (Strife), Nemesis (Retribution) and even the Acherousian/Stygian boatman Charon.
He was also the brother of, among many others, Thanatos and Hypnos.

Sisyphus

SisypheanSisyphosking Sisyphus
But in myths which feature him, Thanatos could occasionally be outwitted, a feat that the sly King Sisyphus of Korinth twice accomplished.
Zeus then ordered Death (in Greek, Thanatos) to chain King Sisyphus down below in Tartarus.

Heracles

HeraklesHerculesAlcides
Sisyphus, son of Aiolos was a more than mortal figure: for mortals Thanatos usually presents an inexorable fate, but he was only once successfully overpowered, by the mythical hero Heracles.
Heracles was an extremely passionate and emotional individual, capable of doing both great deeds for his friends (such as wrestling with Thanatos on behalf of Prince Admetus, who had regaled Heracles with his hospitality, or restoring his friend Tyndareus to the throne of Sparta after he was overthrown) and being a terrible enemy who would wreak horrible vengeance on those who crossed him, as Augeas, Neleus, and Laomedon all found out to their cost.

Moros

Counted among Thanatos' siblings were other negative personifications such as Geras (Old Age), Oizys (Suffering), Moros (Doom), Apate (Deception), Momus (Blame), Eris (Strife), Nemesis (Retribution) and even the Acherousian/Stygian boatman Charon.
Among his other siblings are Thanatos and Ker, who represent the physical aspects of death—Ker being the bringer of violent death and terminal sickness, while Thanatos represents a peaceful passing.

Moirai

Fatesthe FatesThree Fates
Thanatos was loosely associated with the three Moirai (for Hesiod, also daughters of Night), particularly Atropos, who was a goddess of death in her own right.
The three Moirai are daughters of the primeval goddess Nyx ("night"), and sisters of Keres ("the black fates"), Thanatos ("death") and Nemesis ("retribution").

Tartarus

Tartarosa worse placeabyss
When it came time for Sisyphus to die, Zeus ordered Thanatos to chain Sisyphus up in Tartarus.

Atropos

Athrpathough his threads be spoone
Thanatos was loosely associated with the three Moirai (for Hesiod, also daughters of Night), particularly Atropos, who was a goddess of death in her own right.
According to Hesiod's Theogony, Atropos and her sisters (Clotho and Lachesis) were the daughters of Erebus (Darkness) and Nyx (Night) and sister to Thanatos and Hypnos, though later in the same work (ll.

Thanatology

thanatologistthanatologistsnature of death
Thanatology is the academic and scientific study of death among human beings.
In Greek mythology, Thanatos (θάνατος: "death") is the personification of death.

Death drive

death instinctThanatosdeath wish
This postulated death drive allegedly compels humans to engage in risky and self-destructive acts that could lead to their own death.
The death drive is sometimes referred to as "Thanatos" in post-Freudian thought, complementing "Eros", although this term was not used in Freud's own work, being rather introduced by Wilhelm Stekel in 1909 and then by Paul Federn in the present context.

Euthanasia device

euthanasia machineDeliverance MachineMercitron
Doctor Jack Kevorkian named his euthanasia device the Thanatron.
Invented by Jack Kevorkian, to use this device and called it a "Thanatron" or death machine after the Greek daemon, Thanatos.

Alcestis (play)

AlcestisAlkestisAlcestis of Euripides
In Euripides' Alcestis (438 BCE), he is depicted dressed in black and carrying a sword.
He hails the arrival of Thanatos (Death), who, dressed in black and carrying a sword, has come to the palace in his role as psychopomp to lead Alcestis to the underworld.

Eris (mythology)

ErisDiscordiaDiscord
Counted among Thanatos' siblings were other negative personifications such as Geras (Old Age), Oizys (Suffering), Moros (Doom), Apate (Deception), Momus (Blame), Eris (Strife), Nemesis (Retribution) and even the Acherousian/Stygian boatman Charon.

Apate

Apatè
Counted among Thanatos' siblings were other negative personifications such as Geras (Old Age), Oizys (Suffering), Moros (Doom), Apate (Deception), Momus (Blame), Eris (Strife), Nemesis (Retribution) and even the Acherousian/Stygian boatman Charon.

Nemesis

Nemesis (mythology)Nemesis/Rhamnousia/Rhamnusianemeses
Counted among Thanatos' siblings were other negative personifications such as Geras (Old Age), Oizys (Suffering), Moros (Doom), Apate (Deception), Momus (Blame), Eris (Strife), Nemesis (Retribution) and even the Acherousian/Stygian boatman Charon.

Jack Kevorkian

Dr. Jack KevorkianDr. KevorkianDr Kervorkian
Doctor Jack Kevorkian named his euthanasia device the Thanatron.
Kevorkian called the device a "Thanatron" ("Death machine", from the Greek thanatos meaning "death").

Nyx

NoxNightGoddess of the Night
The Greek poet Hesiod established in his Theogony that Thánatos is a son of Nyx (Night) and Erebos (Darkness) and twin of Hypnos (Sleep).
A shadowy figure, Nyx stood at or near the beginning of creation and mothered other personified deities such as Hypnos (Sleep) and Thanatos (Death), with Erebus (Darkness).

Greek underworld

underworldHadesthe underworld
When Thanatos ascended from Hades to claim Alkestis, Heracles sprung upon the god and overpowered him, winning the right to have Alkestis revived.
Fear (Phobos), Hunger (Limos), Need (Aporia), Death (Thanatos), Agony (Algea), and Sleep (Hypnos) also live in front of the entrance, together with Guilty Joys (Gaudia).

Admetus

AdmetoAdmetosApollo and Admetus
Thanatos was consigned to take the soul of Alkestis, who had offered her life in exchange for the continued life of her husband, King Admetos of Pherai.
The scene of death is described in Euripides' play Alcestis, where Thanatos, the god of death, takes Alcestis to the Underworld.

Thanatosensitivity

The term thanatosensitive is derived from the ancient Greek mythological personification of death, Thanatos (Greek: Θάνατος (Thánatos), "Death"), which is itself a term associated with the notion of the death drive common to 20th-century post-Freudian thought.