The $64,000 Question (British game show)

The $64,000 Question$64,000 Question
The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).wikipedia
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The $64,000 Question

The $64,000 ChallengeTake It or Leave It$64,000 Question
The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).
There were three derivated versions in the UK: earlier, The 64,000 Question, Double Your Money (see above) and later, The $64,000 Question.

Independent Broadcasting Authority

IBAIndependent Broadcasting Acts 1973, 1974 and 1978radio industry regulator
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.
British versions of popular American quiz shows had to be adjusted – The $64,000 Question having a maximum prize initially of 64,000 sixpences (£1,600) in the late 1950s, and in the early 1990s of just £6,400.

Bob Monkhouse

Bob Monkhouse OBERobert "Bob" MonkhouseRobert Alan Monkhouse
It was revived in 1990 with Bob Monkhouse as the host and a higher £6,400 top prize.

1950s quiz show scandals

quiz show scandalsquiz show scandalscandal
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.
In 1960, this resulted in the Independent Television Authority's placement of a permanent winnings cap for ITV game shows of £1,000, which the Independent Broadcasting Authority increased to £6,000 in 1981 (though the British version of The $64,000 Question did receive special permission to offer £6,400 when it premiered in 1990).

Associated Television

ATVATV MidlandsATV Music
The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).

Jerry Desmonde

The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).

Sixpence (British coin)

sixpence6dsixpences
The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).

Shilling

sshillingss.
The $64,000 Question is a British game show based on the US format of the same name that originally ran from 19 May 1956 to 18 January 1958 produced by ATV and was originally hosted by Jerry Desmonde, and called simply The 64,000 Question with the top prize initially being 64,000 sixpences (£1,600), later doubling to 64,000 shillings (£3,200).

Inflation

inflation rateprice inflationfood inflation
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.

Independent Television Authority

ITAIndependent Televisioncommercial television
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.

Twenty-One (game show)

Twenty-OneTwenty OneVivienne Nearing
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.

Independent Television Commission

ITCIndependent Broadcasting Authority/Independent Television CommissionThe Independent Television Commission
In 1993, prize limits were lifted by the Independent Television Commission, paving the way for the eventual arrival of Who Wants to be a Millionaire? which itself featured a question worth £64,000 until the format of the show changed in August 2007.

Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? (British game show)

Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?Celebrity Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?Who Wants To Be A Millionaire
In 1993, prize limits were lifted by the Independent Television Commission, paving the way for the eventual arrival of Who Wants to be a Millionaire? which itself featured a question worth £64,000 until the format of the show changed in August 2007.

BBC One

BBC1BBC 1BBC
In December 1991 Wogan was to be cancelled, due to falling ratings against a number of ITV shows, in which Wogan only managed six million viewers compared to double for This Is Your Life, The Krypton Factor and The $64,000 Question.

Lindisfarne (band)

LindisfarneBrethrenCharlie Harcourt
Nichols subsequently joined the hard rock supergroup Widowmaker and in 1991 made a surprise appearance on the ITV game show The $64,000 Question, as a contestant.