The Big Sleep (1946 film)

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The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name.wikipedia
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Film noir

noirnoir filmfilm-noir
The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name.
Film noir encompasses a range of plots: the central figure may be a private investigator (The Big Sleep), a plainclothes policeman (The Big Heat), an aging boxer (The Set-Up), a hapless grifter (Night and the City), a law-abiding citizen lured into a life of crime (Gun Crazy), or simply a victim of circumstance (D.O.A.). Although film noir was originally associated with American productions, the term has been used to describe films from around the world.

Howard Hawks

Howard Hawk[Howard] HawksHawks
The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name.
His most popular films include Scarface (1932), Bringing Up Baby (1938), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), To Have and Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946), Red River (1948), The Thing from Another World (1951), and Rio Bravo (1959).

Humphrey Bogart

BogartHumphrey DeForest Bogart Humphrey Bogart
The film stars Humphrey Bogart as private detective Philip Marlowe and Lauren Bacall as Vivian Rutledge in a story about the "process of a criminal investigation, not its results."
After they married, she also played his love interest in The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947) and Key Largo (1948).

Lauren Bacall

BacallLaurenLauren Bacall,
The film stars Humphrey Bogart as private detective Philip Marlowe and Lauren Bacall as Vivian Rutledge in a story about the "process of a criminal investigation, not its results."
She continued in the film noir genre with appearances with Humphrey Bogart in The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948), and starred in the romantic comedies How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), with Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable, as well as Designing Woman (1957), with Gregory Peck.

Leigh Brackett

a Hollywood screenwriterAlpha Centauri or Die!Brackett, Leigh
William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman co-wrote the screenplay.
She was also a screenwriter, known for her work on such films as The Big Sleep (1946), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980).

The Big Sleep

1939 novel of the same nameBig sleepnovel
The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name.
It has been adapted for film twice, in 1946 and again in 1978.

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film Registryculturally significant
In 1997, the U.S. Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant," and added it to the National Film Registry.

John Ridgely

John RidgleyRidgely, John
John Ridgely as Eddie Mars
He appeared in the 1946 Humphrey Bogart film The Big Sleep as blackmailing gangster Eddie Mars and had a memorable role as a suffering heart patient in the film noir Nora Prentiss (1947).

Jules Furthman

Jules and Charles FurthmanJules G. Furthman
William Faulkner, Leigh Brackett and Jules Furthman co-wrote the screenplay.
He wrote screenplays for a number of important or popular films, including: The Docks of New York (1928), Thunderbolt (1929), Merely Mary Ann (1931), Shanghai Express (1932), Bombshell (1933), Mutiny on the Bounty (1935), Come and Get It (1936), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), To Have and Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946) and Nightmare Alley (1947).

Regis Toomey

Regis Toomey as Chief Inspector Bernie Ohls
Toomey appeared in over 180 films, including classics such as The Big Sleep with Humphrey Bogart.

Martha Vickers

Martha MacVicar
Martha Vickers as Carmen Sternwood
She next went to Warner Bros., where "they gave her the star push, rearranging her surname to 'Vickers.'" Her work there included the role of Carmen Sternwood, the promiscuous, drug-addicted younger sister of Lauren Bacall's character in The Big Sleep (1946).

Peggy Knudsen

Peggy Knudsen as Mona Mars [1946 version]
(In a February 15, 1948, newspaper column, entertainment writer Louella Parsons quoted Knudsen saying, "My first picture was Shadow of a Woman with Helmut Durante. I played his ex-wife.") That same year, she appeared in bit parts in several films including The Big Sleep and Humoresque with Joan Crawford.

Dorothy Malone

Dorothy Maloney
Dorothy Malone as Acme Bookstore proprietress
She first achieved acclaim when Howard Hawks cast her as the bespectacled bookstore clerk in The Big Sleep (1946) with Humphrey Bogart.

Elisha Cook Jr.

Elisha CookElisha Cook, Jr.Elisha Vanslyck Cook, Jr.
Elisha Cook, Jr. as Harry Jones
Cook's acting career spanned more than 60 years, with roles in productions such as The Big Sleep, Shane, The Killing, House on Haunted Hill, and Rosemary's Baby.

Sonia Darrin

Sonia Darrin as Agnes Lowzier (uncredited)
Sonia Darrin (born Sonia Paskowitz; June 16, 1924) is a retired American film actress, best known as "Agnes Lowzier" in The Big Sleep (1946).

Charles Waldron

C.D. Waldron
Charles Waldron as General Sternwood
He is perhaps best known for his final film role, that of General Sternwood in the opening scenes of The Big Sleep (1946), starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.

Louis Jean Heydt

Louis Jean Heydt as Joe Brody
In the 1930s, Heydt traveled to Hollywood, where he appeared in over a hundred films, most notably Gone With the Wind (1939), The Great McGinty (1940), Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) and The Big Sleep (1946).

Philip Marlowe

Marlowe[Philip] MarlowePhillip Marlowe
The film stars Humphrey Bogart as private detective Philip Marlowe and Lauren Bacall as Vivian Rutledge in a story about the "process of a criminal investigation, not its results."
The Big Sleep (1946) — Humphrey Bogart as Marlowe.

Bob Steele (actor)

Bob Steele Bob SteeleBob Steele’s
Bob Steele as Lash Canino
In the 1940s, Steele's career as a cowboy hero was on the decline, but he kept himself working by accepting supporting roles in big movies like Howard Hawks' The Big Sleep, or the John Wayne vehicles Island in the Sky, Rio Bravo, Rio Lobo, The Comancheros, and The Longest Day.

Raymond Chandler

ChandlerChandleresqueChandlerian
The Big Sleep is a 1946 film noir directed by Howard Hawks, the first film version of Raymond Chandler's 1939 novel of the same name.
Arguably the most notable adaptation is The Big Sleep (1946), by Howard Hawks, with Humphrey Bogart as Philip Marlowe.

Thomas E. Jackson

Thomas JacksonTom Jackson
Furthermore, the parts of James Flavin and Thomas E. Jackson were completely eliminated.
He also appeared in the original 1945 version of the classic film noir The Big Sleep (1946), but his on-screen time was cut out when changes were made to it before its ultimate release in 1946.

Charles K. Feldman

Charles FeldmanCharles Feldman Agency
Bacall's agent, Charles K. Feldman, asked that portions of the film be re-shot to capitalize on their chemistry and counteract the negative press Bacall had received for her 1945 performance in Confidential Agent which was released prior to The Big Sleep even though produced after it.
It was Feldman who suggested to Jack L. Warner (as a friend) that he recut Howard Hawks's Big Sleep and add scenes to enhance Bacall's performance, which he felt was more or less a "bit part" in the 1945 cut.

Charles D. Brown

Charles Brown
Charles D. Brown as Norris
The Big Sleep (1946) - Norris - the Butler

Empire (film magazine)

EmpireEmpire'' magazineEmpire Magazine
Empire magazine added The Big Sleep to their Masterpiece collection in the October 2007 issue.
49) The Big Sleep (Issue 220, October 2007)

Christian Nyby

As an editor, he had seventeen feature film credits from 1943 to 1952, including The Big Sleep (1946) and Red River (1948).