The Birds (play)

The BirdsBirdsLes OiseauxThe Birds'' (play)Ornithes
The Birds (Greek: Ὄρνιθες Ornithes) is a comedy by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes.wikipedia
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Cloud cuckoo land

a city in the cloudsCloud Cuckoo-Landcloud-cuckoo-land
After discussion, they name the city-in-the-sky Nubicuculia, or literally "cloud-cuckoo-land", and then Pisthetaerus begins to take charge of things, ordering his friend to oversee the building of the city walls while he organizes and leads a religious service in honour of birds as the new gods.
Aristophanes, a Greek playwright, wrote and directed a drama The Birds, first performed in 414 BC, in which Pisthetaerus, a middle-aged Athenian persuades the world's birds to create a new city in the sky to be named Nubicuculia or Cloud Cuckoo Land, thereby gaining control over all communications between men and gods.

Cinesias (poet)

Cinesias
The famous poet, Cinesias, is next, waxing incoherently lyrical as the poetic mood takes hold of him.
His contemporary, the comic poet Aristophanes, ridiculed him in his play The Birds, in which Cinesias attempts to borrow wings from the birds as an aid to poetic inspiration.

Hoopoe

common hoopoeEurasian hoopoeUpupidae
One of them advises the audience that they are fed up with life in Athens, where people do nothing all day but argue over laws, and they are looking for Tereus, a king who was once metamorphosed into the Hoopoe, for they believe he might help them find a better life somewhere else.
Tereus, transformed into the hoopoe, is the king of the birds in the Ancient Greek comedy The Birds by Aristophanes.

Lysistrata

LisístrataLysistrata, the Grecian temptressthe Greek play
Pellene: A village in the northern Peloponnese where a woollen cloak was awarded to winners in local games. It is mentioned also in Lysistrata.
Peisander: An Athenian aristocrat and oligarch, he is mentioned here by Lysistrata as typical of a corrupt politician exploiting the war for personal gain. He was previously mentioned in Peace and The Birds

Tereus

One of them advises the audience that they are fed up with life in Athens, where people do nothing all day but argue over laws, and they are looking for Tereus, a king who was once metamorphosed into the Hoopoe, for they believe he might help them find a better life somewhere else.
The transformed Tereus is a character in The Birds by Aristophanes.

Meton of Athens

Meton
During this service, he is pestered by a variety of unwelcome visitors including a young versifier out to hire himself to the new city as its official poet, an oracle-monger with prophecies for sale, a famous geometer, Meton, offering a set of town-plans, an imperial inspector from Athens with an eye for a quick profit, and a statute-seller trying to peddle a set of laws originally written for a remote, barely-heard-of town called Olophyx.
Meton appears briefly as a character in Aristophanes' play The Birds (414 BC).

Monopod (creature)

MonopodskiapodsDuffers
Socrates: A famously quixotic philosopher, he was the role model for a generation of hungry, unkempt men until Pisthetaerus inspired new hope (line 1282). He is said to be an unwashed guide to the Underworld and a neighbour of the weird Shadow Foot people (Skiapodes line 1555). He appears as a character in The Clouds and he is mentioned again in The Frogs.
Monopods appear in Aristophanes' play The Birds, first performed in 414 BC. They are described by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History, where he reports travelers' stories from encounters or sightings of Monopods in India.

Aristophanes

AristophanicOld Comedyparabasis
The Birds (Greek: Ὄρνιθες Ornithes) is a comedy by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes.
The Birds (Ὄρνιθες Ornithes; Latin: Aves) 414 BC

The Frogs

Frogs FrogsAristophanes' ''Frogs
Cerameicon: Athens' most conspicuous cemetery – Psithetaerus hopes to get a hero's burial there (line 395). It is mentioned also in The Knights and The Frogs.
In Aristophanes' earlier plays, i.e., The Acharnians and The Birds, the protagonist is victorious prior to the parabasis and after the parabasis is usually shown implementing his reforms.

Prodicus

Prodicus of Ceos
Prodicus: A philosopher and pundit, his knowledge is not respected by the birds (line 692). He is named also in The Clouds.
He appears in a play of Eupolis, and in The Clouds (423 BC) and The Birds (414 BC) of Aristophanes.

Chaerephon

Chaerephon: A loyal disciple of Socrates, he is a bat from hell in this play (lines 1296 and 1564). He is mentioned several times in The Clouds and a couple of times in The Wasps.
Chaerephon appears in three of Aristophanes' comic plays: The Clouds, The Wasps, and The Birds.

Philomela

PhilomelPhilomeleProcne
Itys: The tragically short-lived son of Tereus and Procne, his name is used by the hoopoe when summoning the nightingale (line 212).
In an early account, Sophocles wrote that Tereus was turned into a large-beaked bird whom some scholars translate as a hawk while a number of retellings and other works (including Aristophanes' ancient comedy, The Birds) hold that Tereus was instead changed into a hoopoe.

The Wasps

WaspsThe Wasps of Aristophanes
Gorgias: A renowned orator from Sicily – he and his student (or son) Philippus are barbarous monstrosities disfigured by their versatile tongues (line 1701). Both orators are mention also in The Wasps.
Philocles: A tragic poet (who won first prize when Sophocles competed with Oedipus Rex), yet satirized by comic poets for a harsh style, he is said in line 462 to have an embittering influence on old men. He is mentioned again in Thesmophoriazusae and The Birds.

Porphyrion

Cebriones, Porphyrion: Two of the giants who featured in the Gigantomachy, they are emblematic of the birds' revolt against the Olympian order (lines 553, 1249–52)
Aristophanes' comedy The Birds, contains two brief mentions of Porphyrion.

Crioa (Attica)

CrioaKrioa
Crioa or Krioa: A deme within the Antiochides tribe, it is the nominal home of Euelpides (line 645).
Aristophanes cast a character, Euelpides, from Crioa in his play The Birds.

Nan Dunbar

Nan Dunbar, 1995
She is known for her 1995 edition of Aristophanes' Birds.

Pandora

Greek mythologyGreek counterpartmythological first woman
Pandora: The mythical source of mankind's misfortunes, she is to be placated with the sacrifice of a white ram on the authority of Bacis (line 971).
A scholium to line 971 of Aristophanes' The Birds mentions a cult "to Pandora, the earth, because she bestows all things necessary for life".

Theatre of NOTE

Theater of NOTE
1997: Theatre of N.O.T.E. in Los Angeles presented Ken Roht's 1997 musical adaptation and production.
One of NOTE's most ambitious pieces was Ken Roht's 1997 musical adaptation and production of Aristophanes' The Birds, which stretched the company's vision as well as its physical resources.

Giants (Greek mythology)

GiantsGiantgigantomachy
Cebriones, Porphyrion: Two of the giants who featured in the Gigantomachy, they are emblematic of the birds' revolt against the Olympian order (lines 553, 1249–52)
Aristophanes, Birds in The Complete Greek Drama, vol. 2. Eugene O'Neill, Jr. New York. Random House. 1938. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.

Cleonymus of Athens

Cleonymus
Cleonymus: Constantly the butt of Aristophanic jokes for gluttony and cowardice, he is compared here with a 'Gobbler' bird that has a crest (line 289) and to a tree that drops leaves like shields (1475).
Aristophanes, The Birds, 289-290. (Translated by Peter Meineck). Aristophanes 1 : Clouds, Wasps, Birds. Hackett Publishing Company, 1998. ISBN: 978-0-87220-360-0

Peter Meineck

Meineck, Peter
Peter Meineck, 1998 – prose
Aristophanes 1 : The Clouds, Wasps, Birds (Hackett, 1998)

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The Birds (Greek: Ὄρνιθες Ornithes) is a comedy by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes.

Ancient Greek comedy

comedyNew Comedycomic poet
The Birds (Greek: Ὄρνιθες Ornithes) is a comedy by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes.

Dionysia

City DionysiaCity Dionysia festivalGreater Dionysia
It was performed in 414 BC at the City Dionysia where it won second prize.

Peloponnesian War

Second Peloponnesian WarArchidamian WarPeloponnesian
Unlike the author's other early plays, it includes no direct mention of the Peloponnesian War and there are few references to Athenian politics, and yet it was staged not long after the commencement of the Sicilian Expedition, an ambitious military campaign that greatly increased Athenian commitment to the war effort.