The Canterbury Tales

Canterbury TalesThe Canterbury PilgrimsCanterbury TaleCanterbury PilgrimsCanterbury mesékChaucer's clerk of OxenfordClerk's Talepilgrims toploughmanPrologue of The Knight
The Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories that runs to over 17,000 lines written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer between 1387 and 1400.wikipedia
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Geoffrey Chaucer

ChaucerChaucerianChaucer, Geoffrey
The Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories that runs to over 17,000 lines written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer between 1387 and 1400.
Widely seen as the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages, he is best known for The Canterbury Tales.

Canterbury

Canterbury, KentCanterbury, EnglandCantebury
The tales (mostly written in verse, although some are in prose) are presented as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together from London to Canterbury to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
A journey of pilgrims to Becket's shrine served as the frame for Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century classic The Canterbury Tales.

Middle English

Late Middle EnglishMiddleEarly Middle English
The Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories that runs to over 17,000 lines written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer between 1387 and 1400.
During the 14th century, a new style of literature emerged with the works of writers including John Wycliffe and Geoffrey Chaucer, whose Canterbury Tales remains one of the most studied and read works of the period.

English literature

EnglishJacobeanCaroline
It has been suggested that the greatest contribution of The Canterbury Tales to English literature was the popularisation of the English vernacular in mainstream literature, as opposed to French, Italian or Latin.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1343 – 1400), author of The Canterbury Tales was a significant figure in the development of the legitimacy of vernacular Middle English at a time when the dominant literary languages in England were still French and Latin.

The Decameron

DecameronDecameronePampinea
Structurally, the collection resembles Giovanni Boccaccio's The Decameron, which Chaucer may have read during his first diplomatic mission to Italy in 1372.
In addition to its literary value and widespread influence (for example on Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales), it provides a document of life at the time.

General Prologue

The General PrologueProloguePrologue to the Canterbury Tales
In the General Prologue, some 30 pilgrims are introduced.
The General Prologue is the first part of Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Troilus and Criseyde

Troilus
After a long list of works written earlier in his career, including Troilus and Criseyde, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls, The Canterbury Tales is near-unanimously seen as Chaucer's magnum opus.
As a finished long poem it is more self-contained than the better known but ultimately unfinished The Canterbury Tales.

Hengwrt Chaucer

Hengwrt manuscriptHengwrtMS Peniarth 392D
The very oldest is probably MS Peniarth 392 D (called "Hengwrt"), written by a scribe shortly after Chaucer's death.
The Hengwrt Chaucer manuscript is an early-15th-century manuscript of the Canterbury Tales, held in the National Library of Wales, in Aberystwyth.

Ellesmere Chaucer

Ellesmere manuscriptEllesmere
Another famous example is the Ellesmere Manuscript, a manuscript handwritten by one person with illustrations by several illustrators; the tales are put in an order that many later editors have followed for centuries.
The Ellesmere Chaucer, or Ellesmere Manuscript of the Canterbury Tales, is an early 15th-century illuminated manuscript of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, owned by the Huntington Library, in San Marino, California (EL 26 C 9).

The Knight's Tale

KnightKnight's TaleThe Knight
The Knight's Tale shows how the brotherly love of two fellow knights turns into a deadly feud at the sight of a woman whom both idealise.
"The Knight's Tale" is the first tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The Miller's Tale

MillerMiller's TaleThe Miller
"The Miller's Tale" is the second of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (1380s–1390s), told by the drunken miller Robin to " quite" (a Middle English term meaning requite or pay back, in both good and negative ways) "The Knight's Tale".

The Tabard

Tabard InnThe Tabard InnTabard
The prize for this contest is a free meal at the Tabard Inn at Southwark on their return.
The Tabard was also famous for accommodating people who made the pilgrimage to the Shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, and Geoffrey Chaucer mentions it in his 14th Century work The Canterbury Tales.

Canterbury Cathedral

CanterburyChrist Church, CanterburyChrist Church Priory
The tales (mostly written in verse, although some are in prose) are presented as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together from London to Canterbury to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
The income from pilgrims (such as those portrayed in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales) who visited Becket's shrine, which was regarded as a place of healing, largely paid for the subsequent rebuilding of the cathedral and its associated buildings.

The Man of Law's Tale

Man of Law's TaleConstanceMan of Law
The Man of Law's Tale is the fifth of the Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, written around 1387.

The Friar's Tale

FriarThe FriarHuberd the Friar
In The Friar's Tale, one of the characters is a summoner who is shown to be working on the side of the devil, not God.
"The Friar's Tale" is a story in The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer, told by Huberd the Friar.

British Library, Harley MS 7334

Harley MS. 7334Harley 7334MS Harley 7334
An alternative ordering (seen in an early manuscript containing The Canterbury Tales, the early-fifteenth century Harley MS. 7334) places Fragment VIII before VI.
Harley MS 7334, sometimes known as the Harley Manuscript, is a mediaeval manuscript of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales held in the Harleian Collection of the British Library.

The Wife of Bath's Tale

Wife of BathThe Wife of BathWife of Bath's Tale
The Wife of Bath's Tale is among the best-known of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

The Reeve's Tale

Reeve's TaleReeveThe Reeve's Prologue and Tale
"The Reeve's Tale" is the third story told in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The Summoner's Tale

SummonerSummoner's TaleThe Summoner
"The Summoner's Tale" is one of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.

The Franklin's Tale

FranklinThe Franklin's Prologue and TaleFranklin's Tale
The Franklin’s Tale is a Breton Lai tale, which takes the tale into a liminal space by invoking not only the interaction of the supernatural and the mortal, but also the relation between the present and the imagined past.
"The Franklin's Tale" is one of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.

The Pardoner's Tale

PardonerThe Pardoner’s TalePardoner's Tale
"The Pardoner's Tale" is one of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer.

The Merchant's Tale

MerchantMerchant's Talethe Merchant
"The Merchant's Tale" is one of Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

The Clerk's Tale

ClerkClerk's TaleThe Clerk
The Clerk's Tale is the first tale of Group E (Fragment IV) in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The Squire's Tale

SquireSquire's TaleCanterbury Tale from the Squire
"The Squire's Tale" is a tale in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The Physician's Tale

doctor of physicDoctor of Physic "Physician
The Physician's Tale is one of the Canterbury Tales written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century.