The Cenotaph

CenotaphThe Cenotaph, WhitehallWhitehall CenotaphCenotaph War Memorial CenotaphCenotaph in LondonCenotaph memorial at WhitehallCenotaph on Whitehallhis originalLutyens' Cenotaph
The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England.wikipedia
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War memorial

memorialwar memorialsRoll of Honour
The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England.
For various reasons connected with their character, the same may be said to apply to certain governmental memorials in the United Kingdom (the Cenotaph in London, relating to the Empire in general, and the Scottish National War Memorial in Edinburgh, also with a reference to the Empire, but with particular connections to the United Kingdom, having been opened by the Prince of Wales in 1927 and with the King and the Queen the first visitors and contributors of a casket of the Scottish names for addition within the Shrine).

Whitehall

Parliament StreetWhitehall PlaceWhitehall, London
The Cenotaph is a war memorial on Whitehall in London, England.
As well as government buildings, the street is known for its memorial statues and monuments, including Britain's primary war memorial, the Cenotaph.

Edwin Lutyens

Sir Edwin LutyensLutyensEdwin Landseer Lutyens
Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location.
The best known of these monuments are the Cenotaph in Whitehall, Westminster, and the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, Thiepval.

Remembrance Sunday

remembrance ceremonyRemembrance WeekArmistice Sunday
An annual Service of Remembrance is held at the site on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day) each year. The Cenotaph is the site of the annual National Service of Remembrance held at 11:00 am on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day).
The national ceremony is held in London at the Cenotaph on Whitehall, starting with two minutes' silence at 11am and concluding with the end of The Nation’s Thank You procession at 1:30 p.m. The main part of the ceremony consists of the laying of wreaths by members of the royal family and other dignitaries, prayers, music and a march-past by thousands of military and other units.

Holland, Hannen & Cubitts

CubittsWilliam Cubitt and CompanyCubitt & Co.
Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location.
The combined business went on to construct many important buildings and structures including the Holborn Bars in High Holborn completed in 1906, the Cunard Building in Liverpool completed in 1917, the Cenotaph in London completed in 1920, County Hall, London completed in 1922, Ironmongers' Hall completed in 1925, Unilever House completed in 1930, South Africa House in London completed in 1933, the Senate building of the University of London completed in 1937, the Royal Festival Hall in London completed in 1951, the Roxburgh Dam in New Zealand completed in 1956, New Zealand House in London completed in 1961, the West London Air Terminal completed in 1963, and Trawsfynydd nuclear power station completed in 1965.

Rochdale Cenotaph

Rochdale War Memorial
Although he was overruled and cloth flags were used, Lutyens went on to use stone flags on several of his other war memorials, painted on Rochdale Cenotaph and Northampton War Memorial (among others), and unpainted at Étaples and Villers-Bretonneux IWGC cemeteries.
Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, it is one of seven memorials in England based on his Cenotaph on Whitehall in London and one of his more ambitious designs.

Portland stone

Portland limestonePortlandPortland Stone Formation
Designed by Edwin Lutyens, the permanent structure was built from Portland stone between 1919 and 1920 by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, replacing Lutyens' earlier wood-and-plaster cenotaph in the same location.
Following the First World War, Sir Edwin Lutyens used Portland stone (quarried from the bottom of Wakeham) to construct the Cenotaph in London's Whitehall.

Northampton War Memorial

NorthamptonTown and County War Memorial
Although he was overruled and cloth flags were used, Lutyens went on to use stone flags on several of his other war memorials, painted on Rochdale Cenotaph and Northampton War Memorial (among others), and unpainted at Étaples and Villers-Bretonneux IWGC cemeteries.
It uses three features characteristic of Lutyens's war memorials: a pair of obelisks, the Stone of Remembrance (which Lutyens designed for the Imperial War Graves Commission), and painted stone flags on the obelisks, which were rejected for his Cenotaph in London but feature on several of his other memorials.

National Service of Remembrance

The Cenotaph is the site of the annual National Service of Remembrance held at 11:00 am on Remembrance Sunday, the closest Sunday to 11 November (Armistice Day).
The National Service of Remembrance is held annually on Remembrance Sunday at the Cenotaph on Whitehall, London.

Munstead Wood

Lutyens first encountered the word in connection with Munstead Wood, the house he designed for Gertrude Jekyll in the 1890s.
His proposal was accepted, and used for both the 1919 structure and its permanent replacement in 1920, The Cenotaph, which thereafter became the principal war memorial of the United Kingdom.

Southampton Cenotaph

The Cenotaph, SouthamptonSouthamptonThe Cenotaph
Lutyens' first cenotaph design was for The Cenotaph, Southampton (unveiled 6 November 1920).
The memorial was the first of dozens by Lutyens to be built in permanent form and it influenced his later designs, including The Cenotaph on Whitehall in London.

Royal Air Force Ensign

RAF EnsignEnsignAir Force Ensign of the United Kingdom
On 1 April 1943, an RAF Ensign was substituted for the White Ensign on the west side.
Following the institution of the RAF Ensign in 1921, there were occasional suggestions that it should be flown on the Cenotaph.

Western Front Association

The Western Front Association
Although the Armistice Day ceremony fell away during the Second World War, in recent years the tradition of holding a ceremony at the Cenotaph at 11am on 11 November has been reinstated by The Western Front Association, a UK-based charity dedicated to perpetuating the memory of those who served in the First World War.
The WFA organises each year the Remembrance ceremony held at the Cenotaph in Whitehall, London on 11 November (except when the 11th falls on Remembrance Sunday).

Listed building

Grade II listedlistedGrade II* listed
The Cenotaph was designated a Grade I listed building on 5 February 1970.

Manchester Cenotaph

CenotaphThe CenotaphManchester
The Manchester Cenotaph in Manchester, England (also the work of Lutyens), was unveiled on 12 July 1924 and has similarities and differences.
A sub-committee therefore approached Sir Edwin Lutyens directly, who produced, in a matter of weeks, a variation of his design for the Cenotaph in London.

War Widows Association of Great Britain

War Widows AssociationWar Widows' Association
The War Widows Association of Great Britain hold their Annual Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph on the day before Remembrance Sunday.
The association holds an Annual Service of Remembrance at The Cenotaph, Whitehall, on the day before Remembrance Sunday.

Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment Cenotaph

Two smaller versions that included several additions and differences were built as regimental memorials, the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment Cenotaph in Maidstone, Kent, and the Royal Berkshire Regiment War Memorial in Reading, Berkshire.
Unveiled in 1921, the memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens following his design for the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London and is today a grade II* listed building.

Royal Berkshire Regiment War Memorial

Royal Berkshire Regiment Cenotaph
Two smaller versions that included several additions and differences were built as regimental memorials, the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment Cenotaph in Maidstone, Kent, and the Royal Berkshire Regiment War Memorial in Reading, Berkshire.
Unveiled in 1921, the memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, based on his design for the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London, and is today a grade II* listed building.

Grade I listed war memorials in England

Such memorials are often the work of famous architects or sculptors, amongst the most prolific of whom was Sir Edwin Lutyens, whose memorials account for a third of all those listed at grade I. Lutyens designed dozens of war memorials across the United Kingdom and elsewhere in the Commonwealth, including the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London—the focus for the national Remembrance Sunday services—and the Arch of Remembrance in Leicester—the largest of Lutyens' war memorials in Britain; both are listed at grade I. As part of the commemorations of the centenary of the First World War, Historic England—the government body responsible for listing in England—is running a project with the aim of significantly increasing the number of war memorials on the National Heritage List for England.

Welch Regiment War Memorial

a war memorialWelch Regimental War Memorial
The Welch Regimental War Memorial, in the form of a Lutyens 'Whitehall' cenotaph, was unveiled at Maindy Barracks, Cardiff, on 11 November 1924.
The memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and follows his design for the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London.

The Cenotaph (Hong Kong)

CenotaphThe Cenotaph Central Peace Monument
The Hong Kong cenotaph, an almost exact replica, was unveiled in 1923 between the Statue Square and the City Hall in Hong Kong.
Built in stone, it is an almost exact replica of the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London, UK (designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and unveiled in 1920).

The Unknown Warrior

Tomb of the Unknown WarriorUnknown WarriorBritish Unknown Warrior
At a late stage in the planning, the government decided to hold a funeral for an unidentified soldier exhumed from a grave in France, known as the Unknown Warrior, and inter him in Westminster Abbey, and the decision was taken to make the unveiling part of the funeral procession.
The route followed was Hyde Park Corner, The Mall, and to Whitehall where the Cenotaph, a "symbolic empty tomb", was unveiled by King-Emperor George V.

For the Fallen

Ode of RemembranceLest We ForgetThe Ode
The funeral procession route passed the Cenotaph, where the waiting King laid a wreath on the Unknown Warrior's gun-carriage before proceeding to unveil the memorial which was draped in large Union Flags, and an abridged version of Sir Edward Elgar's setting of Lawrence Binyon's poem 'For the Fallen' was sung.
An abridged version of Elgar's setting of "For the Fallen", called "With Proud Thanksgiving", was sung at the unveiling of the new Cenotaph in Whitehall on 11 November 1920.

Midland Railway War Memorial

Midland Railway
The Midland Railway War Memorial, Derby, was unveiled on 15 December 1921.
He became renowned for The Cenotaph in London, which became Britain's national memorial, and for his work for the Imperial War Graves Commission.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
The flags displayed as of 2007 represent the Royal Navy, the British Army, the Royal Air Force and the Merchant Navy.
It represents the army on the Cenotaph at Whitehall in London, the UK memorial to its war dead.