The Christian Manifesto

Christian ManifestoThree Self Manifesto
"Direction of Endeavor for Chinese Christianity in the Construction of New China", commonly known as "The Christian Manifesto" or "The Three-Self Manifesto", was a political manifesto of Protestants in China whereby they backed the newly-founded People's Republic of China (PRC) and the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC).wikipedia
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Manifesto

election manifestomanifestospolitical manifesto
"Direction of Endeavor for Chinese Christianity in the Construction of New China", commonly known as "The Christian Manifesto" or "The Three-Self Manifesto", was a political manifesto of Protestants in China whereby they backed the newly-founded People's Republic of China (PRC) and the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

Three-Self Patriotic Movement

Three Self Patriotic MovementThree-Self ChurchTSPM
Published in 1950, the manifesto paved the way for the government-controlled Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM) of Protestants. By late summer of 1950, The Christian Manifesto had become part of a campaign to establish the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM) to replace its more outward-oriented predecessor, the National Christian Council of China (NCC).
In 1954, 138 Chinese Christian leaders who presented "The Christian Manifesto" to the country, pledging the support of Christians for anti-imperialism, anti-feudalism, and anti-bureaucratic capitalism efforts.

National Christian Council of China

National Christian Council
By late summer of 1950, The Christian Manifesto had become part of a campaign to establish the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM) to replace its more outward-oriented predecessor, the National Christian Council of China (NCC).
The NCC convened its first national meeting after the war in October 1950, only to approve a pro-communist "Christian Manifesto" and support the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM).

Y. T. Wu

Wu YaozongY.T. Wu
Y. T. Wu and other leftist clergymen espoused the task and presented a draft manifesto that, after some opposition and changes, became a foundational text of Christianity in the new People's Republic. One such group were Chinese Protestants who were based in Shanghai, headed by Y. T. Wu, the secretary of YMCA in China.
However in the 1950s, in consultation with Premier Zhou Enlai, Wu and a number of other Christian leaders published "The Christian Manifesto", eventually signed by 400,000 signatories, that launched the Three-Self Patriotic Movement.

Tian Feng (magazine)

Tian Feng
Over the subsequent days, the Christian magazine Tian Feng and other newspapers, particularly in Shanghai, published it as well.
On 28 July 1950, the Chinese government set out "The Christian Manifesto", largely masterminded by Wu, that urged Chinese Christians to pledge allegiance to the new People's Republic.

K. H. Ting

Ding GuangxunK.H. Ting
Some notable Protestant ministers, such as K. H. Ting, did not sign the document.
In 1954, 138 Chinese Christian leaders who presented the Christian Manifesto to the country, pledging the support of Christians for anti-imperialism, anti-feudalism, and anti-bureaucratic capitalism efforts.

OMF International

China Inland MissionHistorical Bibliography of the China Inland MissionOverseas Missionary Fellowship
China Inland Mission, naively, brushed off charges of imperialism on the grounds that churches they had founded were relatively independent.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
"Direction of Endeavor for Chinese Christianity in the Construction of New China", commonly known as "The Christian Manifesto" or "The Three-Self Manifesto", was a political manifesto of Protestants in China whereby they backed the newly-founded People's Republic of China (PRC) and the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

Communist Party of China

Communist PartyCPCCommunist
"Direction of Endeavor for Chinese Christianity in the Construction of New China", commonly known as "The Christian Manifesto" or "The Three-Self Manifesto", was a political manifesto of Protestants in China whereby they backed the newly-founded People's Republic of China (PRC) and the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

Zhou Enlai

Chou En-laiZhou En-laiZhou En Lai
The manifesto was devised after Protestant leaders presented their concerns with religious freedom to Zhou Enlai, the Premier of China.

Premier of the People's Republic of China

PremierChinese PremierPremier of the State Council of China
The manifesto was devised after Protestant leaders presented their concerns with religious freedom to Zhou Enlai, the Premier of China.

Imperialism

imperialistimperialisticimperial
It condemns missionary activities in China as a form of imperialism, pledges loyalty to the communist leadership, and encourages the Church to take up an indigenous Chinese stance toward Christianity.

People's Daily

People's Daily OnlinePeople’s DailyThe People's Daily
Published on the front page of the People's Daily, the manifesto was accompanied by a campaign to gather signatures.

Korean War

KoreaKoreanKorea War
After the Korean War broke out, the campaign became an increasingly politicized test of loyalty that became merged with the Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries.

Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries

Zhen FanCampaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries (1950-1953)counter-revolutionaries
After the Korean War broke out, the campaign became an increasingly politicized test of loyalty that became merged with the Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries.

Separation of church and state

disestablishmentchurch and stateseparation of religion and state
The manifesto ended missionary activities in China and the separation of church and state.

Constitutional history of the People's Republic of China

Common ProgramCPThe Common Program (1949)
At the same time, the Common Program adopted by the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in 1949, the de facto interim constitution of the PRC, guaranteed freedom of religion.

Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference

CPPCCNational Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative ConferenceChinese People’s Political Consultative Conference
At the same time, the Common Program adopted by the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in 1949, the de facto interim constitution of the PRC, guaranteed freedom of religion.

Protestantism in China

ProtestantProtestantsChinese Protestant
"Direction of Endeavor for Chinese Christianity in the Construction of New China", commonly known as "The Christian Manifesto" or "The Three-Self Manifesto", was a political manifesto of Protestants in China whereby they backed the newly-founded People's Republic of China (PRC) and the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
The Chinese church faced four problems in the changed reality: it was dependent on foreign funding, its confession was fundamentally at odds with the communist ideology, it was wary of how local CPC cadres would implement religious policy of the new government, and finally, the Church was uneasy with China's foreign policy of friendly ties with the Soviet Union.

Shanghai

Shanghai, ChinaSHAShanghai Municipality
One such group were Chinese Protestants who were based in Shanghai, headed by Y. T. Wu, the secretary of YMCA in China.

YMCA

Young Men's Christian AssociationY.M.C.A.Young Men’s Christian Association
One such group were Chinese Protestants who were based in Shanghai, headed by Y. T. Wu, the secretary of YMCA in China.

Social Gospel

Social Gospel MovementChristian activismChristian ideals as solutions to social issues
Wu had envisioned transforming the Chinese church even before 1949: he developed ideas ranging from advocating the Social Gospel to Christian socialism and communism.

Christian socialism

Christian socialistChristian socialistsSocial Christianity
Wu had envisioned transforming the Chinese church even before 1949: he developed ideas ranging from advocating the Social Gospel to Christian socialism and communism.

Parachurch organization

parachurchparachurch organizationsChristian non-profit organization
The TSPM would not be a church, but a government-sponsored parachurch organization directly controlled by the Religious Affairs Division (RAD, now State Administration for Religious Affairs), which in turn is under the United Front Work Department of the CPC.