The Divine Institutes

Divinae InstitutionesInstitutiones DivinaeDivine InstitutesIncomplete text
Institutiones Divinae (, ; The Divine Institutes) is the name of a theological work by the Christian Roman philosopher Lactantius, written between AD 303 and 311.wikipedia
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Lactantius

Lucius Caecilius Firmianus LactantiusDe mortibus persecutorumFirmianus (Lactantius)
Institutiones Divinae (, ; The Divine Institutes) is the name of a theological work by the Christian Roman philosopher Lactantius, written between AD 303 and 311.
His most important work is the Institutiones Divinae ("The Divine Institutes"), an apologetic treatise intended to establish the reasonableness and truth of Christianity to pagan critics.

Vishtaspa

GoshtaspGushtaspVishtasp
Book VII of the work indicates a familiarity with Jewish, Christian, Egyptian and Iranian apocalyptic material, and alludes to the (now-lost) Oracle of Hystaspes.

Sibyl

SibylsSybilHerophile
The work also makes use of Sibylline sources as well as the Hermetica of Hermes Trismegistus.

Hermetica

Corpus HermeticumHermetic CorpusHermetic
The work also makes use of Sibylline sources as well as the Hermetica of Hermes Trismegistus.

Hermes Trismegistus

Hermes TrismegistosHermesTrismegistus
The work also makes use of Sibylline sources as well as the Hermetica of Hermes Trismegistus.

Odes of Solomon

Ode of SolomonThe Odes and Psalms of Solomon
Included in this treatise is also a quote from the nineteenth of the Odes of Solomon, one of only two known texts of the Odes until the early twentieth century.

Spherical Earth

spherical shape of the Earthspheresphericity of the Earth
Lactantius's mockery of the idea of a round earth was criticized by Copernicus in the preface to his book De revolutionibus orbium coelestium, in which the author writes, "Lactantius, the writer celebrated in other ways but very little in mathematics, spoke somewhat childishly of the shape of the earth when he derided those who declared the earth had the shape of a ball" (Lactantium, celebrem alioqui scriptorem, sed Mathematicum parum, admodum pueriliter de forma terræ loqui, cum deridet eos, qui terram globi formam habere prodiderunt).

Nicolaus Copernicus

CopernicusCopernicanNicholas Copernicus
Lactantius's mockery of the idea of a round earth was criticized by Copernicus in the preface to his book De revolutionibus orbium coelestium, in which the author writes, "Lactantius, the writer celebrated in other ways but very little in mathematics, spoke somewhat childishly of the shape of the earth when he derided those who declared the earth had the shape of a ball" (Lactantium, celebrem alioqui scriptorem, sed Mathematicum parum, admodum pueriliter de forma terræ loqui, cum deridet eos, qui terram globi formam habere prodiderunt).

De revolutionibus orbium coelestium

De revolutionibusOn the Revolutions of the Heavenly SpheresDe revolutionibus orbium cœlestium
Lactantius's mockery of the idea of a round earth was criticized by Copernicus in the preface to his book De revolutionibus orbium coelestium, in which the author writes, "Lactantius, the writer celebrated in other ways but very little in mathematics, spoke somewhat childishly of the shape of the earth when he derided those who declared the earth had the shape of a ball" (Lactantium, celebrem alioqui scriptorem, sed Mathematicum parum, admodum pueriliter de forma terræ loqui, cum deridet eos, qui terram globi formam habere prodiderunt).

World Digital Library

The World Digital LibraryWorld Digital ArchiveWorld Digital Library project
According to the World Digital Library, Divinae institutiones was one of the first books to be printed in Italy, as well as the first Italian imprint to be dated.

Wikisource

Christian interpretations of Virgil's Eclogue 4

believed foretold the birth of JesusChristian reception of Virgilinterpretations
In a chapter of his book, Divinae Institutiones (The Divine Institutes), entitled "Of the Renewed World", Lactantius quotes the Eclogue and argues that it refers to Jesus's awaited return at the end of the millennium.

Consolatio (Cicero)

ConsolatioCicero’s ''Consolatio
Seven other fragments were preserved by the early Christian author Lactantius in his work Institutiones Divinae (The Divine Institutes).

The Vision of Dorotheus

DorotheusDorotheus (poet)Papyrus Bodmer 29
This identification has been criticised by who puts forth the Christian Sibylline Oracles (dated to before 303, the terminus ante quem established by Lactantius's Institutiones Divinae) and by who proposes Gregory of Nazianzus's (329–390) large corpus of poetry.

De rerum natura

On the Nature of ThingsOn the Nature of the UniverseDe natura rerum
The Early Christian apologist Lactantius, in particular, heavily cites and critiques Lucretius in his The Divine Institutes and its Epitome, as well as his De ira Dei.

De Legibus

Legg.On the Laws
Two passages were found used in the third- and fourth-century writer Lactantius's Divinae Institutiones (Lactantius also quoted heavily from de re publica), and one further paragraph has been located in Macrobius' Saturnalia.

Zuism

According to independent Zuist researchers, Christianity (viewed as corrupted and dying in its modern forms) is a "false religion, or non-religion", as it "fails to relink Heaven, Earth and humanity"—the word "religion" is derived from the common root of the Latin verbs religere (careful "re-reading" or "re-collecting" right practices) and religare ("re-linking"), according, respectively, to the etymologies provided by Lucretius' De Rerum Natura and Lactantius' Divinae Institutiones.