The Federalist Papers

Federalist PapersPubliusThe FederalistFederalistThe Federalist'' PapersFederalist PaperFederalist no. 44Federalist No. 55List of Federalist Papersthe authors of the Federalist Papers
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.wikipedia
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James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.
He co-wrote The Federalist Papers, co-founded the Democratic-Republican Party, and served as the fifth United States secretary of State from 1801 to 1809.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.
He helped ratify the Constitution by writing 51 of the 85 installments of The Federalist Papers, which are still used as one of the most important references for Constitutional interpretation.

History of the United States Constitution

ratification of the United States ConstitutionratificationConstitutional Convention
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.
The Federalist Papers, published while the states were debating ratification, provided background and justification for the Constitution.

Federalist No. 10

No. 10Federalist 10Federalist Paper No. 10
Federalist No. 10 is generally regarded as the most important of the 85 articles from a philosophical perspective.
10' is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers'', a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.

John Jay

Chief Justice John JayJayfirst Chief Justice of the United States
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.
He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays.

Federalist No. 14

14
This is complemented by Federalist No. 14, in which Madison takes the measure of the United States, declares it appropriate for an extended republic, and concludes with a memorable defense of the constitutional and political creativity of the Federal Convention.
This essay is the fourteenth of The Federalist Papers.

Federalist No. 70

Federalist No. 70 presents Hamilton's case for a one-man chief executive.
It was originally published on March 15, 1788 in The New York Packet under the pseudonym Publius as part of The Federalist Papers and as the fourth in Hamilton's series of eleven essays discussing executive power.

Federalist No. 1

Federalist № 1Nos. 1
In Federalist No. 1, they explicitly set that debate in broad political terms: It has been frequently remarked, that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not, of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend, for their political constitutions, on accident and force.
1' is an essay by Alexander Hamilton, which became the first of a collection of essays named The Federalist Papers''.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
The Federalist Papers is a collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym "Publius" to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution.
Hamilton, Madison, and Jay, under the name of Publius, wrote a series of commentaries, now known as The Federalist Papers, in support of ratification in the state of New York, at that time a hotbed of anti-Federalism.

Federalist No. 78

Federalist 78
Federalist No. 78, also written by Hamilton, lays the groundwork for the doctrine of judicial review by federal courts of federal legislation or executive acts.
78' is an essay by Alexander Hamilton, the seventy-eighth of The Federalist Papers''.

Anti-Federalist Papers

Anti-FederalistAnti-Federalist No. 74Anti-Federalists
These and other articles and public letters critical of the new Constitution would eventually become known as the "Anti-Federalist Papers".
Although less influential than their counterparts, The Federalist Papers, these works nonetheless played an important role in shaping the early American political landscape and in the passage of the US Bill of Rights.

Federalist No. 51

51Federalist Paper No. 51The Federalist No. 51
In Federalist No. 51, Madison distills arguments for checks and balances in an essay often quoted for its justification of government as "the greatest of all reflections on human nature."
51, titled: "The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments"', is an essay by James Madison, the fifty-first of The Federalist Papers''.

United States Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsU.S. Bill of RightsUS Bill of Rights
In Federalist No. 84, Hamilton makes the case that there is no need to amend the Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights, insisting that the various provisions in the proposed Constitution protecting liberty amount to a "bill of rights".
Another delegate, James Wilson of Pennsylvania, later argued that the act of enumerating the rights of the people would have been dangerous, because it would imply that rights not explicitly mentioned did not exist; Hamilton echoed this point in Federalist No. 84.

Federalist No. 39

39Federalist Paper No. 39
In Federalist No. 39, Madison presents the clearest exposition of what has come to be called "Federalism".
39, titled "The conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles'", is an essay by James Madison, the thirty-ninth of The Federalist Papers'', published on January 18, 1788.

Federalist No. 84

Federalist № 84No. 84
In Federalist No. 84, Hamilton makes the case that there is no need to amend the Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights, insisting that the various provisions in the proposed Constitution protecting liberty amount to a "bill of rights".
84''' is a political essay by American Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, the eighty-fourth and penultimate essay in a series known as The Federalist Papers.

Federalism in the United States

federalismFederalistFederalists
In Federalist No. 39, Madison presents the clearest exposition of what has come to be called "Federalism".
The most forceful defense of the new Constitution was The Federalist Papers, a compilation of 85 anonymous essays published in New York City to convince the people of the state to vote for ratification.

Federalist No. 2

2Federalist Nos. 2No. 2
He enlisted John Jay, who after four strong essays (Federalist Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5), fell ill and contributed only one more essay, Federalist No. 64, to the series.
2' is an essay written by John Jay, the second of The Federalist Papers'', a series of 85 essays arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Federalist No. 3

3
He enlisted John Jay, who after four strong essays (Federalist Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5), fell ill and contributed only one more essay, Federalist No. 64, to the series.
3, titled The Same Subject Continued: Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence', is an essay by John Jay, the third of The Federalist Papers''.

The Independent Journal

General AdvertiserIndependent Journal
The first 77 of these essays were published serially in the Independent Journal, the New York Packet, and The Daily Advertiser between October 1787 and April 1788.
The Independent Journal is primarily remembered for being one of several newspapers to have initially published The Federalist papers – a series of eighty-five articles and essays discussing and advocating the ratification of the United States Constitution, written by John Jay, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton.

Douglass Adair

Adair, Douglass
The scholarly detective work of Douglass Adair in 1944 postulated the following assignments of authorship, corroborated in 1964 by a computer analysis of the text:
He is best known for his work in researching the authorship of disputed numbers of The Federalist Papers, and his influential studies in the history and influence of republicanism in the United States during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries—the era of the Enlightenment.

Federalist No. 4

4
He enlisted John Jay, who after four strong essays (Federalist Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5), fell ill and contributed only one more essay, Federalist No. 64, to the series.
4' is an essay by John Jay, the fourth of The Federalist Papers''.

Federalist No. 5

5
He enlisted John Jay, who after four strong essays (Federalist Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5), fell ill and contributed only one more essay, Federalist No. 64, to the series.
5' is an essay by John Jay, the fifth of The Federalist Papers''.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
Hamilton, who had been a leading advocate of national constitutional reform throughout the 1780s and was one of the three representatives for New York at the Constitutional Convention, in 1789 became the first Secretary of the Treasury, a post he held until his resignation in 1795.
Following heated debate, which included the publication of the now quintessential constitutional interpretation – The Federalist Papers – as a series of installments in New York City newspapers, New York was the 11th state to ratify the United States Constitution, on July 26, 1788.

Virginia Ratifying Convention

Virginia conventionVirginia Ratification Conventionratification convention
As for Virginia, which only ratified the Constitution at its convention on June 25, Hamilton writes in a letter to Madison that the collected edition of The Federalist had been sent to Virginia; Furtwangler presumes that it was to act as a "debater's handbook for the convention there", though he claims that this indirect influence would be a "dubious distinction".
The Federalist Papers first became a factor in state ratification conventions outside New York in Virginia.

Federalist No. 85

Jay also distilled his case into a pamphlet in the spring of 1788, An Address to the People of the State of New-York; Hamilton cited it approvingly in Federalist No. 85.
85' is an essay by Alexander Hamilton, the eighty-fifth and last of The Federalist Papers''.