The Gods of Mars

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The Gods of Mars is a science fantasy novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the second of his Barsoom series.wikipedia
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Barsoom

Barsoom'' seriesMarsMars series
The Gods of Mars is a science fantasy novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the second of his Barsoom series.
A Princess of Mars, the first novel in the Barsoom series, with its sequels The Gods of Mars and The Warlord of Mars, forms a trilogy centered upon protagonist John Carter and damsel in distress Dejah Thoris.

John Carter of Mars

John CarterJohn Carter, Warlord of MarsCaptain Carter
At the end of the first book, A Princess of Mars, John Carter is unwillingly transported back to Earth.
Carter reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second (The Gods of Mars, 1918), the third (The Warlord of Mars, 1919), the eighth (Swords of Mars, 1936), the tenth (Llana of Gathol, 1948), and the eleventh and final installment (John Carter of Mars, published posthumously in 1964).

A Princess of Mars

Under the Moons of Mars
At the end of the first book, A Princess of Mars, John Carter is unwillingly transported back to Earth.
Others included the sequel The Gods of Mars and Tarzan of the Apes.

Edgar Rice Burroughs

BurroughsEdgar Rice BurroughE.R. Burroughs
The Gods of Mars is a science fantasy novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the second of his Barsoom series.

Dejah Thoris

Deja ThorisDejah Thoris Vol. 2scantily clad warrior princess
The Gods of Mars begins with his arrival back on Barsoom (Mars) after a ten-year separation from his wife Dejah Thoris, his unborn child, and the Red Martian people of the nation of Helium, whom he has adopted as his own.
She reappeared in subsequent volumes of the series, most prominently in the second, The Gods of Mars (1918), the third, The Warlord of Mars (1919), the eighth, Swords of Mars (1936), and the eleventh, John Carter of Mars (1964).

The Warlord of Mars

Warlord of Mars
The story is thence continued in the third book of Burroughs’ Martian series, The Warlord of Mars.
This novel continues where the previous one in the series, The Gods of Mars abruptly ended.

Argosy (magazine)

ArgosyAll-Story WeeklyArgosy All-Story Weekly
It was first published in The All-Story as a five-part serial in the issues for January–May 1913.
The All-Story is the magazine that first published Edgar Rice Burroughs, beginning with "Under the Moons of Mars", a serialized novel eventually published in book form as A Princess of Mars, and later The Gods of Mars.

Percival Lowell

LowellP. LowellLowell, Percival
Burroughs's vision of Mars was loosely inspired by astronomical speculation of the time, especially that of Percival Lowell, who saw the planet as a formerly Earthlike world now becoming less hospitable to life due to its advanced age, whose inhabitants had built canals to bring water from the polar caps to irrigate the remaining arable land.
The canals, and even Lowell's mausoleum, heavily influence The Gods of Mars (1918) by Edgar Rice Burroughs as well as all other books in the Barsoom series.

John Carter (film)

John CarterJohn Carter of MarsCarter
Before the release of the 2012 film John Carter, producers Jim Morris and Lindsey Collins said that they were working on a sequel based on the second book, with the working title John Carter: The Gods of Mars.
The first film he envisioned would have adapted the first three novels in the Barsoom series: A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, and The Warlord of Mars.

Science fantasy

science-fantasyfantasymythic science fiction
The Gods of Mars is a science fantasy novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the second of his Barsoom series.

A. C. McClurg

A.C. McClurgA. C. McClurg & Co.McClurg
It was later published as a complete novel by A. C. McClurg in September, 1918.

Frame story

framing deviceframe narrativeframe tale
As in many of his novels, Burroughs begins with a frame story that explains how he (Burroughs) came into possession of the text, implying it recounts true events.

Tars Tarkas

The lone survivor is his friend Tars Tarkas, the Jeddak of Thark, who has taken the pilgrimage to the Valley Dor to find Carter.

Pilgrimage

pilgrimagespilgrimspilgrim
Having saved their own lives, Carter and Tars Tarkas discover that the Therns, a white-skinned race of self-proclaimed gods, have for eons deceived the Barsoomians elsewhere by disseminating that the pilgrimage to the Valley Dor is a journey to paradise.

Paradise

paradisicalparadisalparadisiacal
Having saved their own lives, Carter and Tars Tarkas discover that the Therns, a white-skinned race of self-proclaimed gods, have for eons deceived the Barsoomians elsewhere by disseminating that the pilgrimage to the Valley Dor is a journey to paradise.

Mutiny

mutiniedmutiniesmutineers
Near Omean Carter is challenged first by the Therns; secondly by Zat Arras; and lastly by the First Born, whereupon Carter causes the Therns and First Born to fight one another, and the Heliumetic crews of the Zodangan fleet mutiny in support of Carter.

Tarzan of the Apes

novel
During 1912 Burroughs had been working on Tarzan of the Apes, which he finished in June of that year.

The Chessmen of Mars

Chessmen of Mars
However, the device was used in two further Barsoom novels, The Chessmen of Mars and Swords of Mars.

Swords of Mars

However, the device was used in two further Barsoom novels, The Chessmen of Mars and Swords of Mars.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
While the novel is an example of science fiction, it is most closely related to the planetary romance genre.

Planetary romance

Planetary romance: In film and television
While the novel is an example of science fiction, it is most closely related to the planetary romance genre.

Sword and sorcery

sword-and-sorcerySword & Sorceryswords and sorcery
The genre is similar to sword and sorcery, but includes scientific aspects.

Space opera

space-operaspace operasinterstellar
Spacecraft may appear, but are not central to the story (something which makes these tales distinct from Space Opera, where spaceships are usually a key focus of the narrative).

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
Burroughs's vision of Mars was loosely inspired by astronomical speculation of the time, especially that of Percival Lowell, who saw the planet as a formerly Earthlike world now becoming less hospitable to life due to its advanced age, whose inhabitants had built canals to bring water from the polar caps to irrigate the remaining arable land.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
Burroughs's vision of Mars was loosely inspired by astronomical speculation of the time, especially that of Percival Lowell, who saw the planet as a formerly Earthlike world now becoming less hospitable to life due to its advanced age, whose inhabitants had built canals to bring water from the polar caps to irrigate the remaining arable land.