The Huntley–Brinkley Report

Huntley-Brinkley ReportThe Huntley-Brinkley ReportHuntley–Brinkley ReportBrinkleyHuntley Brinkley ReportHuntley-BrinkleyHuntley/BrinkleyHuntley/Brinkley News reportThe Huntley-Brinkley Report'',The Texaco Huntley-Brinkley Report
The Huntley–Brinkley Report (sometimes known as The Texaco Huntley–Brinkley Report for one of its early sponsors) was an American evening news program that aired on NBC from October 29, 1956, to July 31, 1970.wikipedia
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Chet Huntley

Chet Huntley Reporting
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.
Chester Robert "Chet" Huntley (December 10, 1911 – March 20, 1974) was an American television newscaster, best known for co-anchoring NBC's evening news program, The Huntley-Brinkley Report, for 14 years beginning in 1956.

Texaco

Texas CompanyTexas Oil CompanyTexaco Inc.
The Huntley–Brinkley Report (sometimes known as The Texaco Huntley–Brinkley Report for one of its early sponsors) was an American evening news program that aired on NBC from October 29, 1956, to July 31, 1970.
The next year, Texaco became the sole sponsor of The Huntley-Brinkley Report on NBC-TV.

David Brinkley

David Brinkley's JournalBrinkleyThis Week with David Brinkley
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.
From 1956 through 1970, he co-anchored NBC's top-rated nightly news program, The Huntley–Brinkley Report, with Chet Huntley and thereafter appeared as co-anchor or commentator on its successor, NBC Nightly News, through the 1970s.

NBC News

NBCNBC News Radionews
Bill McAndrew, NBC's director of news (later NBC News president), had seen a highly rated local news program on NBC affiliate WSAZ-TV in Huntington, West Virginia, with two anchors reporting from different cities.
The following year, NBC replaced the program with the Huntley-Brinkley Report.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
The Huntley–Brinkley Report (sometimes known as The Texaco Huntley–Brinkley Report for one of its early sponsors) was an American evening news program that aired on NBC from October 29, 1956, to July 31, 1970.
Notable NBC News productions past and present include Today, NBC Nightly News (and its immediate predecessor, the Huntley-Brinkley Report), Meet the Press (which has the distinction of the longest continuously running program in the history of American television), Dateline NBC, Early Today, NBC News at Sunrise, NBC Nightside and Rock Center with Brian Williams.

John Cameron Swayze

John Swayze
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.
The Huntley-Brinkley Report soon became the nation's top-rated television newscast; Edwards was replaced during 1962 by Walter Cronkite.

Camel News Caravan

Camel Newsreel TheatrePlymouth News Caravan
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.
The Camel News Caravan was replaced by the Huntley-Brinkley Report on October 29, 1956.

Reuven Frank

It was developed and produced initially by Reuven Frank.
Later that same year, he created the groundbreaking Huntley-Brinkley Report, and was its producer until 1964.

Walter Cronkite

CronkiteWalter KronkiteAnd that's the way it is.
By that time, the program had surpassed CBS's evening news program, Douglas Edwards with the News, in ratings and maintained higher viewership levels for much of the 1960s, even after Walter Cronkite took over CBS's competing program (initially named Walter Cronkite with the News in 1962 and renamed the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite in 1963). The program's ratings slipped late in the decade as CBS's Walter Cronkite gained fame for his coverage of the space program, a field in which neither Huntley nor Brinkley had much interest (although Huntley and Brinkley occasionally participated in space coverage, another NBC newsman, Frank McGee, was the prime anchor of NBC's space coverage).
During the early part of his tenure anchoring the CBS Evening News, Cronkite competed against NBC's anchor team of Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, who anchored the Huntley-Brinkley Report.

Eliot Frankel

Frank left the program in 1962 to produce documentaries (Eliot Frankel replaced him) but returned to the program the following year when it expanded to 30 minutes.
In 1956, he went to work for The Huntley-Brinkley Report, where he remained until 1963, when he moved to London to direct the network's European news gathering; remained there until 1966.

WSAZ-TV

WSAZWSAZ-DT2W16CE
Bill McAndrew, NBC's director of news (later NBC News president), had seen a highly rated local news program on NBC affiliate WSAZ-TV in Huntington, West Virginia, with two anchors reporting from different cities.
NBC studied the format and used it as the basis for The Huntley-Brinkley Report anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. All of the big three networks have used this approach at one time or another since then.

1969 in television

1969almost six years earlier
For most of its run, The Huntley–Brinkley Report aired only Monday through Friday, but in January 1969, the network expanded it to Saturday evenings, with Huntley and Brinkley working solo on alternating weeks, although sometimes, the other would be seen in a taped essay or commentary recorded on Friday.

NBC Nightly News

NBC Nightly News with Brian WilliamsNightly NewsNBC Nightly News with Lester Holt
Upon Huntley's retirement, the network renamed the program the NBC Nightly News.
NBC Nightly News replaced The Huntley–Brinkley Report in August 1970 upon Chet Huntley's retirement.

John Chancellor

Chancellor, JohnJohn William Chancellor
Originally a copy boy at 14 for the Chicago Daily News and hired in 1947 to be a reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times, he started his career in local television in Chicago, eventually turning to national television news as a correspondent on NBC's evening newscast, the Huntley-Brinkley Report.

Robert Conley (reporter)

Robert Conley
* Robert Conley
Conley was a foreign correspondent for The New York Times in the 1950s and 1960s, bureau chief for NBC News, Africa, as well as a foreign correspondent for NBC News' The Huntley-Brinkley Report throughout the 1960s, editor for and contributor to National Geographic magazine in the late 1960s to early 1970s, and first host of the groundbreaking and popular Peabody Award winning National Public Radio (NPR) radio news and cultural program All Things Considered in the 1970s.

Frank McGee (journalist)

Frank McGee
The program's ratings slipped late in the decade as CBS's Walter Cronkite gained fame for his coverage of the space program, a field in which neither Huntley nor Brinkley had much interest (although Huntley and Brinkley occasionally participated in space coverage, another NBC newsman, Frank McGee, was the prime anchor of NBC's space coverage).
In 1970, after Huntley's retirement ended the Huntley-Brinkley Report, McGee became one of a platoon of three anchors on the newly renamed NBC Nightly News, along with Chancellor and David Brinkley.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
It was anchored by Chet Huntley in New York City, and David Brinkley in Washington, D.C. It succeeded the Camel News Caravan, anchored by John Cameron Swayze.

CBS Evening News

Douglas Edwards with the NewsThe CBS Evening NewsCBS Evening News with Dan Rather
By that time, the program had surpassed CBS's evening news program, Douglas Edwards with the News, in ratings and maintained higher viewership levels for much of the 1960s, even after Walter Cronkite took over CBS's competing program (initially named Walter Cronkite with the News in 1962 and renamed the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite in 1963). The program ran for 15 minutes at its inception but expanded to 30 minutes on September 9, 1963, exactly a week after the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite did so.

Huntington, West Virginia

HuntingtonHuntington, WVHuntington WV
Bill McAndrew, NBC's director of news (later NBC News president), had seen a highly rated local news program on NBC affiliate WSAZ-TV in Huntington, West Virginia, with two anchors reporting from different cities.

Catchphrase

catch phrasecatchphrasescatch-phrase
This exchange became one of television's most famous catchphrases even though both Huntley and Brinkley initially disliked it.

White House

The White HouseExecutive MansionPresident's House
Huntley handled the bulk of the news most nights, with Brinkley specializing in Washington-area topics such as the White House, U.S. Congress, the Pentagon.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
Huntley handled the bulk of the news most nights, with Brinkley specializing in Washington-area topics such as the White House, U.S. Congress, the Pentagon.

The Pentagon

PentagonPentagon buildingUS Pentagon
Huntley handled the bulk of the news most nights, with Brinkley specializing in Washington-area topics such as the White House, U.S. Congress, the Pentagon.

Symphony No. 9 (Beethoven)

Ninth SymphonySymphony No. 9Beethoven's Ninth Symphony
(When one was on vacation the other would typically handle the full broadcast alone, leaving viewers with a familiar anchor instead of a little-known substitute such as a field reporter.) The closing credits music for the broadcast was the second movement (scherzo) of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, from the 1952 studio recording with Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra.