The Jazz Singer

1927 film19271927 film versionCântărețul de jazzfilmfilm version of the same nameJazz Singermovie adaptationT''he Jazz Singerthe 1927 original
The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical drama film directed by Alan Crosland.wikipedia
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Musical film

musicalmusical comedy filmmusicals
The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical drama film directed by Alan Crosland.
The Jazz Singer, released in 1927 by Warner Brothers, was the first to include an audio track including non-diegetic music and diegetic music, but it had only a short sequence of spoken dialogue.

Sound film

talkietalkiessound
Its release heralded the commercial ascendance of sound films and ended the silent film era.
The first feature film originally presented as a talkie was The Jazz Singer, released in October 1927.

Silent film

silentsilent erasilent films
Its release heralded the commercial ascendance of sound films and ended the silent film era.
Early sound films, starting with The Jazz Singer in 1927, were variously referred to as the "talkies," "sound films," or "talking pictures."

Al Jolson

JolsonA. JolsonAsa Yoelson / Al Jolson, as a boy
The film features six songs performed by Al Jolson.
Although best remembered today as the star of the first talking picture, The Jazz Singer (1927), he starred in a series of successful musical films during the 1930s.

Vitaphone

The Vitaphone CorporationThe Vitaphone Corp.Vitaphone Orchestra
It was produced by Warner Bros. with its Vitaphone sound-on-disc system.
Many early talkies, such as The Jazz Singer (1927), used the Vitaphone system.

Academy Honorary Award

Honorary Academy AwardHonorary AwardHonorary Oscar
Darryl F. Zanuck won an Honorary Academy Award for producing the film; Alfred A. Cohn was nominated for Best Writing (Adaptation) at the 1st Academy Awards.

Warner Bros.

Warner BrothersWarner Bros. PicturesWarner Bros
It was produced by Warner Bros. with its Vitaphone sound-on-disc system.
As a result of their financial problems, Warner Bros. took the next step and released The Jazz Singer starring Al Jolson.

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Adapted ScreenplayBest Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another MediumBest Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Darryl F. Zanuck won an Honorary Academy Award for producing the film; Alfred A. Cohn was nominated for Best Writing (Adaptation) at the 1st Academy Awards.

Alan Crosland

The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical drama film directed by Alan Crosland.
He was chosen to direct Al Jolson in The Jazz Singer (1927).

The Jazz Singer (play)

The Jazz Singerplay of the same nameplay
It is based on the play of the same name by Samson Raphaelson, which itself was adapted from one of his short stories titled "The Day of Atonement".
A highly influential movie adaptation was released in 1927.

Otto Lederer

He appeared in 120 films between 1912 and 1933, most notably The Jazz Singer, the first full-length film to have sound sequences, and the Laurel and Hardy short You're Darn Tootin'.

May McAvoy

Some of her major roles are Laura Pennington in The Enchanted Cottage, Esther in Ben-Hur, and Mary Dale in The Jazz Singer.

Warner Oland

Over the next 15 years, he appeared in more than 30 films, including a major role in The Jazz Singer (1927), one of the first talkies produced.

My Mammy

Mammy
Jack, in blackface, performs the song "My Mammy" for her and for the world.
Jolson recorded this song twice and performed it in films, including The Jazz Singer (1927), The Singing Fool (1928) and Rose of Washington Square (1939).

Blue Skies (Irving Berlin song)

Blue SkiesBlue Skies" (Irving Berlin song)
That same year, it became one of the first songs to be featured in a talkie, when Al Jolson performed it in The Jazz Singer.

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film RegistryLibrary of Congress National Film Registry
In 1996, The Jazz Singer was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry of "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" motion pictures.

Blackface

black faceblacked upblackface minstrelsy
As Jack prepares for a dress rehearsal by applying blackface makeup, he and Mary discuss his career aspirations and the family pressures they agree he must resist.
The licorice brand Tabu, owned by Perfetti Van Melle and distributed in Europe, introduced a cartoon minstrel mascot in the 1980s inspired by Al Jolson's blackface performance in The Jazz Singer, which is still in use today.

1st Academy Awards

first Academy Awards(1st)1st
Darryl F. Zanuck won an Honorary Academy Award for producing the film; Alfred A. Cohn was nominated for Best Writing (Adaptation) at the 1st Academy Awards.
Two presentations were made of a Special Award: Charlie Chaplin, a multiple nominee for one movie (Best Actor, Best Writer and Best Director, Comedy; all for The Circus) having been removed from the list so as to recognize his total contribution to the industry; and Warner Brothers, an award for pioneering talking pictures (The Jazz Singer).

Eugenie Besserer

Eugénie BessererEugenie Besserrer
In a later scene, Jack talks with his mother, played by Eugenie Besserer, in the family parlor; his father enters and pronounces one very conclusive word, "Stop!"

George Jessel (actor)

George JesselGeorgie Jessel George Jessel
With George Jessel in the lead role, the show premiered at the Warner Theatre in Times Square on September 1925 and became a hit.
Whereas Jolson's film career skyrocketed after the 1927 release of The Jazz Singer, Jessel remained in smaller movie roles, often intended for audiences fond of Jewish and other "ethnic" humor.

George Groves (sound engineer)

George GrovesGeorge R. Groves
The sound for the film was recorded by British-born George Groves, who had also worked on Don Juan.
He is also credited as being Hollywood's first ‘sound man’; he was the recording engineer on the seminal Al Jolson picture, The Jazz Singer (1927), as well as many other early talkies.

Yossele Rosenblatt

Josef RosenblattCantor Josef "Yossele" RosenblattJosef "Yossele" Rosenblatt
The Jazz Singer contains those, as well as numerous synchronized singing sequences and some synchronized speech: Two popular tunes are performed by the young Jakie Rabinowitz, the future Jazz Singer; his father, a cantor, performs the devotional Kol Nidre; the famous cantor Yossele Rosenblatt, appearing as himself, sings an excerpt of another religious melody, Kaddish, and the song "Yahrzeit Licht".
Rosenblatt's fame extended beyond the Jewish world earning him large concert fees, a singing role in the 1927 film The Jazz Singer, and the sobriquet "The Jewish Caruso".

Harry Warner

HarryHarry M. Warner
According to Jessel's description in his autobiography, Harry Warner "was having a tough time with the financing of the company.... He talked about taking care of me if the picture was a success. I did not feel that was enough."
The success of Warner Bros.' early talkie films (The Jazz Singer, The Lights of New York, The Singing Fool and The Terror) catapulted the studio into the ranks of the major studios.

Louis Silvers

Lou SilversLouis "Lou" Silvers
Born in New York City, Silvers scored a D. W. Griffith film with sound sequences Dream Street (1921) and the part-talking feature film The Jazz Singer (1927).