The Left Hand of Darkness

GethenLeft Hand of DarknessLeft Hand of Darkness,Science fiction as thought experiment
The Left Hand of Darkness is a science fiction novel by U.S. writer Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969.wikipedia
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Ursula K. Le Guin

Ursula Le GuinUrsula K. LeGuinLe Guin
The Left Hand of Darkness is a science fiction novel by U.S. writer Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969.
She began writing full-time in the late 1950s and achieved major critical and commercial success with A Wizard of Earthsea (1968) and The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), which have been described by Harold Bloom as her masterpieces.

1969 in literature

19691970published in 1969
The Left Hand of Darkness is a science fiction novel by U.S. writer Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969.

Feminist science fiction

Femspecfeministfeminist fantasy
The Left Hand of Darkness was among the first books in the genre now known as feminist science fiction and is the most famous examination of androgyny in science fiction.
Three notable texts of this period are Ursula K. Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), Marge Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time (1976) and Joanna Russ' The Female Man (1970).

City of Illusions

Among the Hainish novels, it was preceded in the sequence of writing by City of Illusions and followed by The Word for World Is Forest.
In The Left Hand of Darkness, Genly Ai comes from Earth and remembers the 'Age of the Enemy' as something dreadful but now past.

Hainish Cycle

EkumenHainishHainish universe
The novel is part of the Hainish Cycle, a series of novels and short stories by Le Guin set in the fictional Hainish universe, which she introduced in 1964 with "The Dowry of the Angyar".
The Hainish novels The Left Hand of Darkness (1969) and The Dispossessed (1974) have won literary awards, as have the novella The Word for World Is Forest (1972) and the short story "The Day Before the Revolution" (1974).

Ansible

ansible.co.uk
These take years to travel between planetary systems, although the journey is shortened for the travelers due to relativistic time dilation, as well as through instantaneous interstellar communication using the ansible, introduced in The Dispossessed.
* In The Left Hand of Darkness, it is stated that the ansible "doesn't involve radio waves, or any form of energy. The principle it works on, the constant of simultaneity, is analogous in some ways to gravity ... One point has to be fixed, on a planet of certain mass, but the other end is portable."

The Dispossessed

dispossessedPravicThe Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia
The Hainish novels, such as The Dispossessed, Left Hand, and The Word for World is Forest, also frequently explore the effects of differing social and political systems.
The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia is a 1974 utopian science fiction novel by American writer Ursula K. Le Guin, set in the fictional universe of the seven novels of the Hainish Cycle, e.g. The Left Hand of Darkness, about anarchist and other societal structures.

The Word for World Is Forest

Among the Hainish novels, it was preceded in the sequence of writing by City of Illusions and followed by The Word for World Is Forest. The Hainish novels, such as The Dispossessed, Left Hand, and The Word for World is Forest, also frequently explore the effects of differing social and political systems.
Several critics, however, stated that it compared unfavorably with Le Guin's other works such as The Left Hand of Darkness, due to its sometimes polemic tone and lack of complex characters.

Winter's King

as well as by switching masculine pronouns for feminine ones in a later reprinting of "Winter's King", an unconnected short story set on Gethen.
The story takes place on Gethen, the same planet shown in more detail in The Left Hand of Darkness.

Coming of Age in Karhide

The story is set on the fictional planet of Gethen, the same as Le Guin's 1969 novel The Left Hand of Darkness, and is a part of Le Guin's Hainish cycle.

Feminism

feministfeministsemancipation of women
Le Guin identified with feminism, and was interested in non-violence and ecological awareness.
Notable texts of this kind are Ursula K. Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness (1969), Joanna Russ' The Female Man (1970), Octavia Butler's Kindred (1979) and Margaret Atwood's Handmaid's Tale (1985).

Tuesday Smillie

Many works of the transgender artist Tuesday Smillie exhibited at the Rose Art Museum take inspiration from the book.
Many of Smillie's collections take inspiration from feminist science fiction author Ursula K. Le Guin, primarily her book The Left Hand of Darkness, about gender-fluid inhabitants of the planet Gethen.

Earthsea

Earthsea CycleEarthsea seriesEarthsea (radio series)
Left Hand has been a focus of literary critique of Le Guin's work, along with her Earthsea fiction and utopian fiction.
In addition to the Earthsea radio drama, the thematic month included the airing of a two-part radio adaptation of The Left Hand of Darkness earlier in April, as well as exclusive interviews with Le Guin and some of the writers she inspired.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
1969's The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin was set on a planet in which the inhabitants have no fixed gender.

Biology in fiction

adopt female or male sexual characteristicsbiologybiology-inspired fiction
In her 1969 The Left Hand of Darkness, Le Guin presents her vision of a universe of planets all inhabited by "men", descendants from the planet Hain.

The Dowry of the Angyar

Semley's NecklaceDowry of the AngyarThe Dowry of Angyar
The novel is part of the Hainish Cycle, a series of novels and short stories by Le Guin set in the fictional Hainish universe, which she introduced in 1964 with "The Dowry of the Angyar".

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
The novel follows the story of Genly Ai, a native of Terra, who is sent to the planet of Gethen as an envoy of the Ekumen, a loose confederation of planets.

Hugo Award for Best Novel

Best NovelHugoHugo Award
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Nebula Award for Best Novel

Best NovelNebula AwardNebula
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Frank Herbert

Herbert Frank HerbertHerbert, Frank
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Dune (novel)

Dunenovel of the same nameDune World
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Arthur C. Clarke

Arthur C ClarkeSir Arthur C. ClarkeClarke
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Childhood's End

Guardian Angelnovel of the same nameof the same name
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Locus (magazine)

LocusLocus MagazineLocus'' magazine
It was voted the Hugo and Nebula Awards for Best Novel by fans and writers, respectively, and was ranked third behind Frank Herbert's Dune and Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End in a 1975 poll in Locus magazine.

Harold Bloom

Bloom, HaroldBloomBloom, Harold.
In 1987, Locus ranked it second among science fiction novels after Dune and Harold Bloom stated: "Le Guin, more than Tolkien, has raised fantasy into high literature, for our time".