The Maritimes

MaritimesMaritime ProvincesCanadian MaritimesMaritimeMaritime CanadaCanadian MaritimeCanadian Maritime ProvincesMaritime provinces of CanadaMaritimerMaritime colonies
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI).wikipedia
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Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI). Acadians eventually built small settlements throughout what is today mainland Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as Île-Saint-Jean (Prince Edward Island), Île-Royale (Cape Breton Island), and other shorelines of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in present-day Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec.
Nova Scotia is one of Canada's three Maritime Provinces, and one of the four provinces that form Atlantic Canada.

Prince Edward Island

PEPEIP.E.I.
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI). Acadians eventually built small settlements throughout what is today mainland Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as Île-Saint-Jean (Prince Edward Island), Île-Royale (Cape Breton Island), and other shorelines of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in present-day Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec.
Prince Edward Island (PEI; Île-du-Prince-Édouard) is a province of Canada and one of the three Maritime Provinces.

List of regions of Canada

RegionSouth OntarioNorthern Saskatchewan
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI).

Maritime Union

a unionAtlantic provincial unionismAtlantic Union
The notion of a Maritime Union has been proposed at various times in Canada's history; the first discussions in 1864 at the Charlottetown Conference contributed to Canadian Confederation which instead formed the larger Dominion of Canada.
Maritime Union (Union des Maritimes) is a proposed political union of the three Maritime provinces of Canada – New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island – to form a single new province.

Atlantic Canada

Atlantic ProvincesEast Coast of CanadaAtlantic Canadian
Together with Canada's easternmost province, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Maritime provinces make up the region of Atlantic Canada.
Atlantic Canada, also called the Atlantic provinces, is the region of Canada comprising the four provinces located on the Atlantic coast, excluding Quebec: the three Maritime provinces – New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island – and the easternmost province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Charlottetown Conference

CharlottetownCharlottetown Conference, 1864Confederation Conference
The notion of a Maritime Union has been proposed at various times in Canada's history; the first discussions in 1864 at the Charlottetown Conference contributed to Canadian Confederation which instead formed the larger Dominion of Canada.
The conference had been planned as a meeting of representatives from the Maritime colonies: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Abenaki

Abenaki peopleAbenakisAbnaki
The Late Period extended from 3,000 years ago until first contact with European settlers and was dominated by the organization of First Nations peoples into the Algonquian-influenced Abenaki Nation which existed largely in present-day interior Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, and the Mi'kmaq Nation which inhabited all of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, eastern New Brunswick and the southern Gaspé.
The Abenaki originate in what is now called Quebec and the Maritimes of Canada and in the New England region of the United States, a region called Wabanahkik ("Dawn Land") in the Eastern Algonquian languages.

Maritime

Maritime (disambiguation)
The word maritime is an adjective that simply means "of the sea", thus any land associated with the sea can be considered a maritime state or province (all provinces of Canada except Alberta and Saskatchewan border the sea).

Eastern Canada

Canada EastEasternEastern Canadian
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI).
New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island are also known as the Maritime Provinces.

Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia
Champlain's success in the region, which came to be called Acadie, led to the fertile tidal marshes surrounding the southeastern and northeastern reaches of the Bay of Fundy being populated by French immigrants who called themselves Acadien.
Acadia (Acadie) was a colony of New France in northeastern North America which included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and Maine to the Kennebec River.

Acadians

AcadianAcadian settlersFrench
Champlain's success in the region, which came to be called Acadie, led to the fertile tidal marshes surrounding the southeastern and northeastern reaches of the Bay of Fundy being populated by French immigrants who called themselves Acadien. The Mi'kmaq, Maliseet and Passamaquoddy people are indigenous to the Maritimes, while Acadian and British settlements date to the 17th century.
The colony was located in what is now Eastern Canada's Maritime provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island), as well as part of Quebec, and present-day Maine to the Kennebec River.

Bay of Fundy

FundybayFundy Bay
Champlain's success in the region, which came to be called Acadie, led to the fertile tidal marshes surrounding the southeastern and northeastern reaches of the Bay of Fundy being populated by French immigrants who called themselves Acadien. The Passamaquoddy Nation inhabited the northwestern coastal regions of the present-day Bay of Fundy.
At that time what is now The Maritimes was situated near the equator and had a warm tropical climate and vegetation was lush.

Isthmus of Chignecto

ChignectoChignecto IsthmusRaid on Chignecto
Important settlements also began in the Beaubassin region of the present-day Isthmus of Chignecto, and in the Saint John River valley, and settlers began to establish communities on Île-Saint-Jean and Île-Royale as well.
The Isthmus of Chignecto is an isthmus bordering the Maritime provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia that connects the Nova Scotia peninsula with North America.

Expulsion of the Acadians

Great UpheavalGreat ExpulsionAcadian Expulsion
The British began the Expulsion of the Acadians with the Bay of Fundy Campaign (1755).
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.

Algonquian peoples

AlgonquianAlgonquinAlgonquians
The Late Period extended from 3,000 years ago until first contact with European settlers and was dominated by the organization of First Nations peoples into the Algonquian-influenced Abenaki Nation which existed largely in present-day interior Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, and the Mi'kmaq Nation which inhabited all of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, eastern New Brunswick and the southern Gaspé.
The French and later English encountered the Maliseet of present-day Maine, Quebec and New Brunswick; the Abenaki of Quebec, Vermont and New Hampshire; the Mi'kmaw band governments of the Maritimes lived primarily on fishing.

Fort Beauséjour

Fort CumberlandFort BeausejourFort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland National Historic Site
The largest military action in the Maritimes during the revolutionary war was the attack on Fort Cumberland (the renamed Fort Beausejour) in 1776 by a force of American sympathizers led by Jonathan Eddy.
The site was strategically important in Acadia, a French colony that included parts of what is now Quebec, The Maritimes, and northern Maine.

Battle of Fort Cumberland

Eddy RebellionFort CumberlandSiege of Fort Cumberland
The largest military action in the Maritimes during the revolutionary war was the attack on Fort Cumberland (the renamed Fort Beausejour) in 1776 by a force of American sympathizers led by Jonathan Eddy.
The successful defense of Fort Cumberland preserved the territorial integrity of the British Maritime possessions, and Nova Scotia remained loyal throughout the war.

William Alexander, 1st Earl of Stirling

Sir William AlexanderWilliam AlexanderSir William Alexander of Menstrie
In 1613, Virginian raiders captured Port-Royal, and in 1621 Acadia was ceded to Scotland's Sir William Alexander who renamed it Nova Scotia.
However the effort cost him most of his fortune, and when the region—now Canada's three Maritime Provinces and the state of Maine—was returned to France in 1632, it was lost.

Charlottetown

Charlottetown, Prince Edward IslandCharlottetown, PEICharlottetown, PE
The major communities of the region include Halifax and Cape Breton in Nova Scotia, Saint John, Fredericton and Moncton in New Brunswick, and Charlottetown in Prince Edward Island.
It was famously the site of the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, the first gathering of Canadian and Maritime statesmen to debate the proposed Maritime Union and the more persuasive British North American Union, now known as Canadian Confederation.

Moncton

Moncton, New BrunswickMoncton, CanadaMoncton, NB
The major communities of the region include Halifax and Cape Breton in Nova Scotia, Saint John, Fredericton and Moncton in New Brunswick, and Charlottetown in Prince Edward Island.
Situated in the Petitcodiac River Valley, Moncton lies at the geographic centre of the Maritime Provinces.

Cape Breton Regional Municipality

Cape BretonCape Breton, Nova ScotiaCBRM
The major communities of the region include Halifax and Cape Breton in Nova Scotia, Saint John, Fredericton and Moncton in New Brunswick, and Charlottetown in Prince Edward Island.
The glaciers began their retreat from the Maritimes approximately 13,500 years ago, with final deglaciation, post-glacial rebound, and sea level fluctuation ending and leaving the New England-Maritimes region virtually ice free 11,000 years ago.

Saint Lawrence

St. LawrenceSt LawrenceLawrence of Rome
Acadians eventually built small settlements throughout what is today mainland Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as Île-Saint-Jean (Prince Edward Island), Île-Royale (Cape Breton Island), and other shorelines of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in present-day Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec.
Many names in what are now Québec and the Maritime Provinces of Canada are references to this important seaway, e. g., the Laurentian mountains north of the city of Montreal, Saint-Laurent (borough), Saint Lawrence Boulevard which spans the width of the Island of Montreal, and St. Lawrence County, New York, United States near Lake Ontario.

History of Nova Scotia

Nova ScotiaNova Scotia HistoryDemocracy 250
In Nova Scotia, the population grew steadily from 277,000 in 1851 to 388,000 in 1871, mostly from natural increase since immigration was slight.
Nova Scotia (also known as Mi'kma'ki and Acadia) is a Canadian province located in Canada's Maritimes.

Constitution Act, 1867

British North America Act of 1867British North America Act, 1867British North America Act
The Charlottetown Conference ended with an agreement to meet the following month in Quebec City, where more formal discussions ensued, culminating with meetings in London and the signing of the British North America Act.
The Senate has 105 Senators (Section 21), most of whom represent (Section 22) one of four equal divisions: Ontario, Quebec, the Maritime Provinces and the Western Provinces (at the time of the Union, there were 72 senators).

Scottish Gaelic

GaelicScots GaelicGaelic language
As a result, significant portions of the three provinces are influenced by Celtic heritages, with Scottish Gaelic (and to a lesser degree, Irish Gaelic) having been widely spoken, particularly in Cape Breton, although it is less prevalent today.
Nova Scotia also has Comhairle na Gàidhlig (The Gaelic Council of Nova Scotia), a non-profit society dedicated to the maintenance and promotion of the Gaelic language and culture in Maritime Canada.