The Metropolis of Tomorrow

The Metropolis of Tomorrow is a 1929 book written and illustrated by Hugh Ferriss.wikipedia
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Hugh Ferriss

Hugh Ferris
The Metropolis of Tomorrow is a 1929 book written and illustrated by Hugh Ferriss.
These four drawings would later be used in his 1929 book The Metropolis of Tomorrow.

1916 Zoning Resolution

first zoning regulationsZoning Resolution of 19161916 Zoning Act
Ferriss proceeds to describe and diagram the evolution of the setback principle for skyscraper design, in which he likens the architect's work to a sculptor working with clay, and argues that New York City's zoning laws are actually a blessing in disguise to architects as they all but mandated the adoption of the setback principle.
The Metropolis of Tomorrow, with essay by Carol Willis.

Population density

densitypopulation densitiesdensely populated
The second section, "Projected Trends", prominently discusses practical concerns related to population density and traffic congestion, demonstrates Ferriss' adherence to some of the key elements of modern architecture (especially functionalism), and then analyzes projected trends in urban design that he supports, as well as a few that he opposes.

Traffic congestion

traffic jamcongestiontraffic jams
The second section, "Projected Trends", prominently discusses practical concerns related to population density and traffic congestion, demonstrates Ferriss' adherence to some of the key elements of modern architecture (especially functionalism), and then analyzes projected trends in urban design that he supports, as well as a few that he opposes.

Modern architecture

modernistModernModernism
The second section, "Projected Trends", prominently discusses practical concerns related to population density and traffic congestion, demonstrates Ferriss' adherence to some of the key elements of modern architecture (especially functionalism), and then analyzes projected trends in urban design that he supports, as well as a few that he opposes.

Functionalism (architecture)

functionalismfunctionalistfunctionalistic
The second section, "Projected Trends", prominently discusses practical concerns related to population density and traffic congestion, demonstrates Ferriss' adherence to some of the key elements of modern architecture (especially functionalism), and then analyzes projected trends in urban design that he supports, as well as a few that he opposes.

David McKay Publications

David McKayDavid McKay CompanyDavid McKay Co.
First published by Ives Washburn in 1929, The Metropolis of Tomorrow was out of print long before the Princeton Architectural Press republished it in 1986.

Princeton Architectural Press

Architectural Press
First published by Ives Washburn in 1929, The Metropolis of Tomorrow was out of print long before the Princeton Architectural Press republished it in 1986.

Regional planning

regionalregional plannerregional planners
While in the minority, negative contemporary reviews of the book significantly came mostly from proponents of the regional planning movement.

Carol Willis (architectural historian)

Carol Willis
Writing with the benefit of hindsight in 1986, architectural historian Carol Willis noted the strong connections between the first and second sections of the book ("Cities of Today" and "Projected Trends"), but criticized the final section ("An Imaginary Metropolis") as a flight of fantasy, both impracticable and lacking in nuance.

Comic book

comic bookscomic-bookcomic
Similarly, more recent reviewers have concentrated on "An Imaginary Metropolis", which they generally view as a fantasy which has had a strong influence on later architects and urban planners, and has also been influential to the appearance of futuristic cities in comic books and films.

Film

motion picturemoviefilms
Similarly, more recent reviewers have concentrated on "An Imaginary Metropolis", which they generally view as a fantasy which has had a strong influence on later architects and urban planners, and has also been influential to the appearance of futuristic cities in comic books and films.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The first section, "Cities of Today", begins with a vignette describing the contemporary New York City skyline of the late 1920s in theatrical terms, largely focusing on the enormous scale of modern skyscrapers and the impressions they make on city dwellers.

St. Louis

St. Louis, MissouriSt. Louis, MOSaint Louis, Missouri
The first two buildings profiled are both in St. Louis: the Telephone Building, noted for its use of setbacks; and the St. Louis Plaza, which Ferriss upheld as an example of collaborative architectural planning that did not compromise design.

Southwestern Bell Building

St. Louis Telephone BuildingTelephone Building
The first two buildings profiled are both in St. Louis: the Telephone Building, noted for its use of setbacks; and the St. Louis Plaza, which Ferriss upheld as an example of collaborative architectural planning that did not compromise design.

Setback (architecture)

setbackssetbackset back
The first two buildings profiled are both in St. Louis: the Telephone Building, noted for its use of setbacks; and the St. Louis Plaza, which Ferriss upheld as an example of collaborative architectural planning that did not compromise design.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
The next two buildings featured are in Chicago, the Chicago Board of Trade Building and the Chicago Tribune Building, the latter of which Ferriss considered unusually beautiful for an office building.

Chicago Board of Trade Building

Board of Trade Buildingthe present Holabird and Root Building
The next two buildings featured are in Chicago, the Chicago Board of Trade Building and the Chicago Tribune Building, the latter of which Ferriss considered unusually beautiful for an office building.

Tribune Tower

Chicago Tribune TowerChicago Tribune BuildingChicago Tribune
The next two buildings featured are in Chicago, the Chicago Board of Trade Building and the Chicago Tribune Building, the latter of which Ferriss considered unusually beautiful for an office building.

American Radiator Building

Bryant Park HotelAmerican Radiator Building (American Standard Building)American Standard Building
These buildings include the Radiator Building, the Shelton Hotel, the unbuilt Belden Project, the Master Building, the Waldorf-Astoria Office Building, the lobby of the Daily News Building, and the unbuilt Convocation Tower.

New York Marriott East Side

Shelton HotelShelton Towers Hotel, New York City
These buildings include the Radiator Building, the Shelton Hotel, the unbuilt Belden Project, the Master Building, the Waldorf-Astoria Office Building, the lobby of the Daily News Building, and the unbuilt Convocation Tower.

Master Apartments

Riverside MuseumMaster Building310 Riverside Drive
These buildings include the Radiator Building, the Shelton Hotel, the unbuilt Belden Project, the Master Building, the Waldorf-Astoria Office Building, the lobby of the Daily News Building, and the unbuilt Convocation Tower.

Waldorf Astoria New York

Waldorf-Astoria HotelWaldorf-AstoriaWaldorf Astoria
These buildings include the Radiator Building, the Shelton Hotel, the unbuilt Belden Project, the Master Building, the Waldorf-Astoria Office Building, the lobby of the Daily News Building, and the unbuilt Convocation Tower.

Daily News Building

News Building220 East 42nd StreetDaily News Building, First Floor Interior
These buildings include the Radiator Building, the Shelton Hotel, the unbuilt Belden Project, the Master Building, the Waldorf-Astoria Office Building, the lobby of the Daily News Building, and the unbuilt Convocation Tower.

Detroit

Detroit, MichiganDetroit, MICity of Detroit
Following them are three buildings in Detroit that Ferriss described as "undoubtedly the forerunners of the future city": the Greater Penobscot Building, the Fisher Building, and the David Stott Building.