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Morecambe and Wise

Morecambe & WiseThe Morecambe and Wise ShowMorcambe and Wise
The Morecambe & Wise Show was a comedy sketch show originally broadcast by BBC television and the third TV series by English comedy double-act Morecambe and Wise. For example, Grieg's Piano Concerto with André Previn, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes with Shirley Bassey and Glenda Jackson's medley of Hollywood tunes all came from the same Christmas Show in 1971.
In a list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes drawn up by the British Film Institute in 2000, voted for by industry professionals, The Morecambe and Wise Show was placed 14th.

Bill Cotton

Sir Bill CottonWilliam Frederick Cotton
Grade's refusal to grant them a series in colour led to their agent, Michael Grade (who happened to be Lew Grade's nephew) contacting Bill Cotton, the Head of Variety at BBC television.
In this position, Cotton was responsible for overseeing the production of a whole series of popular and iconic comedy programmes, including The Morecambe and Wise Show (1968–77), Monty Python's Flying Circus (1969–74), The Two Ronnies (1971–87), Bruce Forsyth and the Generation Game (first run 1971–77) and Look: Mike Yarwood (1971-76).

Glenda Jackson

Glenda Jackson MPGlenda Jackson CBEGlenda Jackson Theatre
For example, Grieg's Piano Concerto with André Previn, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes with Shirley Bassey and Glenda Jackson's medley of Hollywood tunes all came from the same Christmas Show in 1971.
In 1971 she made the first of several appearances with Morecambe and Wise, appearing in a comedy sketch as Cleopatra for the BBC Morecambe and Wise Show in which she delivered the line "All men are fools and what makes them so is having beauty like what I have got."

There Is Nothing Like a Dame

There Is Nothin' Like a DameNothin' Like a DameThere's Nothin' Like a Dame
The 1977 special included a version of 'There Is Nothing Like a Dame', performed by a chorus line of male BBC presenters, including Barry Norman, Michael Aspel and Peter Woods.
A comic version of this song was performed in the 1977 Christmas edition of the BBC's Morecambe and Wise Show, as well as being performed in another Morecambe and Wise Show — one of their shows featured Cliff Richard in the song.

Eddie Braben

The loss of Hills and Green could have ended up being a terminal problem for the duo, but Bill Cotton then suggested that the duo talk to Eddie Braben, who had recently stopped working with Ken Dodd.
The first Braben-penned Morecambe & Wise Show was broadcast in July 1969, and he wrote most of their BBC shows after that, including many of the Christmas specials.

Janet Webb

There were several items that overran into other shows and series; the first was the "lady who comes down at the end" (Janet Webb) who, despite having no involvement in the 50-minute programme would stride onto the stage at the very end of the show (after all the guest stars had taken their curtain-call) and take a bow.
Webb was best known for her appearances on BBC television's The Morecambe & Wise Show where she was "the lady who comes on at the end".

Rex Rashley

The recurring character, originally billed as Frankie Vaughan's son, appeared regularly in the earlier series and was played by Rex Rashley who also appeared variously as "John Wayne" and "Bob Pope" in a sketch which involves Little Ern thinking he's going to be Bob Hope's script writer, only for the ageing figure of Rashley to appear through the drapes.
Rex Rashley (1894–1972) was a British character actor who appeared regularly on The Morecambe & Wise Show (1968) often dressed in familiar stars' attire as part of a joke.

Arthur Lowe

the English actor of the same name
In one episode she "marries" Arthur Lowe who claims he only agreed to appear on the understanding he could meet her.
On television he appeared twice as a guest performer on The Morecambe and Wise Show (1971 and 1977), alongside Richard Briers in a series of Ben Travers farces for the BBC, as the pompous Dr Maxwell in the ITV comedy Doctor at Large (1971) and as Redvers Bodkin, a snooty, old-fashioned butler, in the short-lived sitcom The Last of the Baskets (1971–72).

Two of a Kind (British TV series)

Two of a KindTwo Of A Kind (1961)*
It began airing in 1968 on BBC2, specifically because it was then the only channel broadcasting in colour, following the duo's move to the BBC from ATV, where they had made Two of a Kind since 1961.

Peter Cushing

Peter Wilton Cushing
The horror film actor Peter Cushing was one of the first to be so treated beginning the long-running in-joke that he had never been paid.

Peter Woods (journalist)

Peter Woods
The 1977 special included a version of 'There Is Nothing Like a Dame', performed by a chorus line of male BBC presenters, including Barry Norman, Michael Aspel and Peter Woods.
Along with all the other BBC newsreaders of the time, Woods participated in the 1977 Christmas edition of the Morecambe and Wise Show.

Des O'Connor

Des O ConnorDes O’ConnorDes O' Connor
The answer to this turned out to be very simple; the premise of the joke was simply transferred over to Morecambe's friend Des O'Connor who memorably was the butt of many unkind jokes for several years, culminating in his appearance on both the 1975 and 1976 Christmas Specials to much acclaim.
* O'Connor appeared as a guest on The Morecambe and Wise Show a number of times.

Ernest Maxin

He was most notable for taking over from John Ammonds in producing The Morecambe and Wise Show from 1974 until 1977.

British comedy

comedyBritishBrit-Coms
The Morecambe & Wise Show was a comedy sketch show originally broadcast by BBC television and the third TV series by English comedy double-act Morecambe and Wise.

Sketch comedy

sketchsketch showsketches
The Morecambe & Wise Show was a comedy sketch show originally broadcast by BBC television and the third TV series by English comedy double-act Morecambe and Wise.

BBC Television

BBC TVBBCBBC-TV
The Morecambe & Wise Show was a comedy sketch show originally broadcast by BBC television and the third TV series by English comedy double-act Morecambe and Wise. Grade's refusal to grant them a series in colour led to their agent, Michael Grade (who happened to be Lew Grade's nephew) contacting Bill Cotton, the Head of Variety at BBC television.

BBC

British Broadcasting Corporationthe BBCBBC Music
It began airing in 1968 on BBC2, specifically because it was then the only channel broadcasting in colour, following the duo's move to the BBC from ATV, where they had made Two of a Kind since 1961.

Thames Television

ThamesThames TVITV (Thames)
After their 1977 Christmas show Morecambe and Wise left the BBC and signed with Thames Television, marking their return to the ITV network.

ITV (TV network)

ITVITV NetworkIndependent Television
After their 1977 Christmas show Morecambe and Wise left the BBC and signed with Thames Television, marking their return to the ITV network.

Eric Morecambe

EricMorecambeEric Bartholomew
In early 1968, Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise were due to begin negotiations over a new contract with ATV.

Ernie Wise

Ernest WisemanErnieErnie Wiseman
In early 1968, Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise were due to begin negotiations over a new contract with ATV.

Associated Television

ATVATV MidlandsATV Music
It began airing in 1968 on BBC2, specifically because it was then the only channel broadcasting in colour, following the duo's move to the BBC from ATV, where they had made Two of a Kind since 1961. In early 1968, Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise were due to begin negotiations over a new contract with ATV.

Black and white

black-and-whiteblack and white filmblack & white
However, the series was still broadcast in black and white, as ITV had yet to begin colour transmissions.