The Mother of All Demos

Mother of All Demos1968 presentationdemonstratesdemonstration of a networked computer system with a graphics display, mouse and keyboardfirst public demonstrationThe Demo
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.wikipedia
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Douglas Engelbart

Doug EngelbartDouglas C. EngelbartDouglas Englebart
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.
These were demonstrated at The Mother of All Demos in 1968.

Computer mouse

mousemicecomputer mice
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).
On 9 December 1968, Engelbart publicly demonstrated the mouse at what would come to be known as The Mother of All Demos.

Joint Computer Conference

Fall Joint Computer ConferenceNational Computer ConferenceSpring Joint Computer Conference
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.
In 1968 in San Francisco, California Douglas Engelbart presented "The Mother of All Demos" presenting such then-new technologies as the computer mouse, video conferencing, teleconferencing, and hypertext.

Hypertext

hypertextualityhypertext markupmetatext
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).
In December of that year, Engelbart demonstrated a 'hypertext' (meaning editing) interface to the public for the first time, in what has come to be known as "The Mother of All Demos".

NLS (computer system)

NLSoN-Line SystemAugment
The live demonstration featured the introduction of a complete computer hardware and software system called the oN-Line System or, more commonly, NLS. Much of Engelbart's thought that led to the development of his Augmentation Research Center (ARC), as well as the oN-Line System was derived from the "research culture" of World War II and the early Cold War.
This has since been dubbed "The Mother of All Demos", as it not only demonstrated the groundbreaking features of NLS, but also involved assembling some remarkable state-of-the-art video technologies.

Collaborative real-time editor

online editingreal-time collaborative editingreal-time collaboration
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).
The first instance of a collaborative real-time editor was demonstrated by Douglas Engelbart in 1968, in The Mother of All Demos.

DARPA

Defense Advanced Research Projects AgencyAdvanced Research Projects AgencyARPA
Over the course of six years, with the funding help of both NASA and ARPA, his team went about putting together all the elements that would make such a computer system a reality.
DARPA also funded the development of the Douglas Engelbart's NLS computer system and The Mother of All Demos; and the Aspen Movie Map, which was probably the first hypermedia system and an important precursor of virtual reality.

Augmentation Research Center

AugmentAugmented Human Intellect Research Center
Much of Engelbart's thought that led to the development of his Augmentation Research Center (ARC), as well as the oN-Line System was derived from the "research culture" of World War II and the early Cold War.
This was later called "the Mother of All Demos".

Robert Taylor (computer scientist)

Robert TaylorBob TaylorRobert W. Taylor
At the urging of ARPA's director, Robert Taylor, the NLS would make its first public appearance at the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco's Civic Auditorium.
The public demonstration of a mouse-based user interface was later called "the Mother of All Demos."

Charles Irby

Notable attendees in the audience included Alan Kay, Charles Irby and Andy van Dam, as well as Bob Sproull.
Irby joined SRI International's Augmentation Research Center after witnessing the 1968 The Mother of All Demos, to work on oN-Line System (NLS), eventually becoming chief architect for the system.

Stewart Brand

Whole Earth
The camera operator in Menlo Park was Stewart Brand—at the time, a non-computer person, best known as the editor of the Whole Earth Catalog—who also advised Engelbart and the team about how to present the demo.
In late 1968, Brand assisted electrical engineer Douglas Engelbart with The Mother of All Demos, a famous presentation of many revolutionary computer technologies (including hypertext, email, and the mouse) to the Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco.

Bill Graham Civic Auditorium

San Francisco Civic AuditoriumCivic AuditoriumCivic Center
At the urging of ARPA's director, Robert Taylor, the NLS would make its first public appearance at the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco's Civic Auditorium.
The famous Mother of All Demos was presented here during the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference, and the World Cyber Games 2004 were also held here.

Bill English (computer engineer)

Bill EnglishWilliam English Bill English
Engelbart, with the help of his geographically distributed team including Bill Paxton), with Bill English directing the presentation's technical elements, demonstrated NLS's functions.
English was also instrumental at The Mother of All Demos in 1968, which showcased the mouse and other technologies developed as part of their NLS (oN-Line System).

Alan Kay

Alan C. KayAlan Curtis KayKay
Notable attendees in the audience included Alan Kay, Charles Irby and Andy van Dam, as well as Bob Sproull.

Ben Neill

Ben Neill, Jr.
It was composed and performed by Mikel Rouse and Ben Neill, with its premiere at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall.
The Demo, an electronic opera co-created with composer Mikel Rouse and based on Douglas Engelbart's 1968 demonstration of early computer technology (called "The Mother of All Demos"), was premiered in 2015 at the Bing Concert Hall at Stanford University.

SDS 940

SDS-940XDS-940XDS 940
The Augment researchers also created two customized homemade modems at 1200 baud – high-speed for 1968 – linked via a leased line to transfer data from the computer workstation keyboard and mouse at the Civic Auditorium to their Menlo Park headquarter's SDS-940 computer.
It was with this computer that he gave The Mother of All Demos in December 1968, heralding many of the concepts associated with personal computing today.

Bill Paxton (computer scientist)

Bill Paxton
Engelbart, with the help of his geographically distributed team including Bill Paxton), with Bill English directing the presentation's technical elements, demonstrated NLS's functions.
He worked with Doug Engelbart at the Stanford Research Institute where the group would build the Online System (NLS) and was there during "The Mother of All Demos".

Mikel Rouse

It was composed and performed by Mikel Rouse and Ben Neill, with its premiere at Stanford's Bing Concert Hall.
He collaborated with Ben Neill on The Demo, based on The Mother of All Demos, a technological demonstration of 1968.

Community Memory

Community Memory Project
* Community Memory
It was written in QSPL and ran on an SDS 940, an early timesharing system the size of eight refrigerators, originally used by Douglas Engelbart in The Mother of All Demos, which had been donated to Resource One for community use.

Association for Computing Machinery

ACMAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)ACM Press
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

IEEEFellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics EngineersTechnical Field Award
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
"The Mother of All Demos" is a name retroactively applied to a landmark computer demonstration, given at the Association for Computing Machinery / Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ACM/IEEE)—Computer Society's Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco, which was presented by Douglas Engelbart on December 9, 1968. At the urging of ARPA's director, Robert Taylor, the NLS would make its first public appearance at the 1968 Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco's Civic Auditorium.

Window (computing)

windowwindowsapplication window
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).

Videotelephony

videoconferencingvideo conferencingvideo chat
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).

Dynamic linker

dynamic linkingdynamic librarydynamic
The 90-minute presentation essentially demonstrated almost all the fundamental elements of modern personal computing: windows, hypertext, graphics, efficient navigation and command input, video conferencing, the computer mouse, word processing, dynamic file linking, revision control, and a collaborative real-time editor (collaborative work).