The New Church (Swedenborgian)

SwedenborgianSwedenborgianismThe New ChurchNew ChurchNew Jerusalem ChurchSwedenborgiansChurch of the New JerusalemNew JerusalemSwedenborgian churchNeo-Christian
The New Church (or Swedenborgianism) is the name for several historically related Christian denominations that developed as a new religious group, influenced by the writings of scientist and Swedish Lutheran theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772).wikipedia
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Johnny Appleseed

John ChapmanJohnny Appleseed DayJohn "Appleseed" Chapman
New Church ideas were brought to the United States by missionaries, one of whom was John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed).
He was also a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian) and the inspiration for many museums and historical sites such as the Johnny Appleseed Museum in Urbana, Ohio, and the Johnny Appleseed Heritage Center in Ashland County, Ohio.

General Church of the New Jerusalem

General Church of the New Jerusalem (The New Church)New Church
It later became known as the General Church of the New Jerusalem – sometimes called the General Church – with its headquarters in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania (a suburb of Philadelphia).
The General Church of the New Jerusalem (also referred to as the General Church or just simply the New Church) is an international church based in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania, and based on the Old Testament, the New Testament, and the theological works of Emanuel Swedenborg (often called the Writings for the New Church or just the Writings).

Colchester New Church

Two Convention congregations in Canada (one in Toronto and another in Kitchener) and two congregations from the British Conference – Michael Church in London and Colchester New Church – joined the General Church.
Colchester New Church is a Christian New Church in Colchester, England which has as its theological basis the Old and New Testaments and the theological writings of Emanuel Swedenborg.

Christian denomination

denominationdenominationsChristian denominations
The New Church (or Swedenborgianism) is the name for several historically related Christian denominations that developed as a new religious group, influenced by the writings of scientist and Swedish Lutheran theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772).
Another antecedent of this movement was Swedenborgianism, founded in 1787 on the writings of Emanuel Swedenborg, who claimed to have received a new revelation from Jesus Christ through continuous heavenly visions which he experienced over a period of at least twenty-five years.

Christian theosophy

Theosophytheosophisttheosophical
Occultism became increasingly popular during the 19th century (particularly in France and England), and some followers blended Swedenborg's writings with theosophy, alchemy, and divination.
This society was renamed in 1785 as "The British Society for the Propagation of the Doctrines of the New Church", consisting of Swedenborgian based beliefs.

Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania

Bryn AthynBryn Athyn Bryn Athyn, PA
It later became known as the General Church of the New Jerusalem – sometimes called the General Church – with its headquarters in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania (a suburb of Philadelphia).

Swedenborgian Church of North America

SwedenborgianSwedenborgian ChurchChurch of New Jerusalem
The US church was organized in 1817 with the founding of the General Convention of the New Church (sometimes shortened to the Convention), now also known as the Swedenborgian Church of North America.
The Swedenborgian Church in North America is one of the Four Church Organizations that comprise The New Church.

Salvation in Christianity

atonementsalvationAtonement in Christianity
The church is seen by its members as what Jesus is establishing with those who believe that he is the one God of heaven and Earth, with obedience to Jesus's commandments being necessary for salvation.
According to the doctrine of The New Church, as explained by Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772), there is no such thing as substitutionary atonement as is generally understood.

God in Christianity

GodChristian GodLord
He predicted in his writings that God would replace the traditional Christian Church, establishing a New Church that would worship Jesus Christ as God.
Other groups include Oneness Pentecostals, Christadelphians, Christian Scientists, and The New Church.

Nicene Creed

NiceneNicene-Constantinopolitan CreedCreed
Swedenborg believed that God is one person revealed in Jesus Christ, He wrote that the doctrine of a three-person trinity originated during the fourth century with the adoption of the Nicene Creed to combat Arianism, but it was unknown to the Apostolic Church (indicated by the Apostles' Creed, which preceded the Nicene Creed).
Non-Trinitarian groups, such as the Church of the New Jerusalem, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Jehovah's Witnesses, explicitly reject some of the statements in the Nicene Creed.

Daniel Burnham

Daniel H. BurnhamDaniel Hudson BurnhamBurnham
Burnham was born in Henderson, New York and raised in the teachings of the Swedenborgian called The New Church, which ingrained in him the strong belief that man should strive to be of service to others.

Robert Frost

FrostRobert Lee Frost
Frost's mother joined the Swedenborgian church and had him baptized in it, but he left it as an adult.

Bush family

BushBush political familyDorothy Walker Bush
The Hebrew text was examined by the 19th-century biblical scholar George Bush (a relative of the Bush family), who later became a Swedenborgian minister.

Stephen Gyllenhaal

Gyllenhaal
Stephen grew up in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia in a close-knit Swedenborgian family and graduated from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut in 1972, with a degree in English.

New Thought

New Thought Movementmind-cureHigher Thought
New Thought, a spiritual movement that began in the United States during the late 19th century, promotes positive thinking and healing.
During the late 19th century, the metaphysical healing practices of Quimby mingled with the "Mental Science" of Warren Felt Evans, a Swedenborgian minister.

Henry James Sr.

Henry James, Sr.his fatherWilliam James
Henry James Sr. (June 3, 1811 – December 18, 1882) was an American theologian and adherent of Swedenborgianism, also known for being the father of the philosopher William James, the novelist Henry James, and the diarist Alice James.

William Blake

BlakeBlakeanW. Blake
Some biographers have suggested that Blake tried to bring a concubine into the marriage bed in accordance with the beliefs of the more radical branches of the Swedenborgian Society, but other scholars have dismissed these theories as conjecture.

Emanuel Swedenborg

SwedenborgEmmanuel SwedenborgSwedenborg's Angels
The New Church (or Swedenborgianism) is the name for several historically related Christian denominations that developed as a new religious group, influenced by the writings of scientist and Swedish Lutheran theologian Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772).
The New Church, a new religious movement comprising several historically-related Christian denominations, reveres Swedenborg's writings as revelation.

George Inness

InnessGeorge Inness (1825-1894)
He also rented a studio there above that of painter William Page, who likely introduced the artist to Swedenborgianism.

George Bush (biblical scholar)

George Bush
The Hebrew text was examined by the 19th-century biblical scholar George Bush (a relative of the Bush family), who later became a Swedenborgian minister.
In 1845 he embraced Swedenborgianism and went on to write many defenses of his new faith.

Warren Felt Evans

Warren Evans
Quimby healed Warren Felt Evans, a Swedenborgian minister who ecame a healer and published several books promoting New Thought in New Church doctrines.
That year he left the Methodists and joined the Church of the New Jerusalem after reading the books of Emanuel Swedenborg.

Lois W.

Lois WilsonLois Burnham WilsonLois
Lois was raised in the Swedenborgian faith, of which her grandfather was a pastor.

Justification (theology)

justificationjustifiedDoctrine of Justification
Catholics and Protestants agree on the belief in the trinity, original sin, and justification by faith; the main difference is that the Protestants believe that faith alone saves, without acts of charity.
According to the doctrine of The New Church, as explained by Emanuel Swedenborg, the doctrine of justification by faith alone is a false belief which forms the foundation of much of Protestant theology.

New Jerusalem

Heavenly JerusalemCity of GodCelestial city
It is the fulfillment of the prophecy of a New Jerusalem in the Book of Revelation.
Ecclesiastic Swedenborgians often refer to their organizations as part of or contributing to the New Jerusalem as explained by Emanuel Swedenborg in such books as New Jerusalem and Its Heavenly Doctrine, Apocalypse Revealed, and Apocalypse Explained.

Ernest George Trobridge

Trobridge was an adherent of Swedenborgianism and it may have been his religious beliefs which led him to be interested in domestic architecture for working-class people.