The Oz Film Manufacturing Company

Oz Film Manufacturing Company
The Oz Film Manufacturing Company was a short-lived independent film studio from 1914 to 1915.wikipedia
78 Related Articles

The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914 film)

The Patchwork Girl of OzfilmOz
The company is best known for three of its films that survive, albeit with missing footage, today: The Patchwork Girl of Oz, The Magic Cloak of Oz, and His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz.
The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1914) is a silent film made by L. Frank Baum's The Oz Film Manufacturing Company.

Louis F. Gottschalk

Louis Ferdinand GottschalkLouis Gottschalk
It was founded by L. Frank Baum (president), Louis F. Gottschalk (vice president), Harry Marston Haldeman (secretary), and Clarence R. Rundel (treasurer) as an offshoot of Haldeman's social group, The Uplifters, that met at the Los Angeles Athletic Club. L. Frank Baum wrote all the scripts, and Louis F. Gottschalk wrote complete original scores that were sent out with the films, at time when improvising stock cues from the repertoire was common.
Baum, as president, with Gottschalk, as vice president, Harry Marston Haldeman as secretary, and Clarence R. Rundel as treasurer, founded The Oz Film Manufacturing Company in 1914 as an outgrowth of Haldeman's men's social group, The Uplifters, which met at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.

J. Farrell MacDonald

J. Farrell McDonald
J. Farrell MacDonald directed all of the film productions and acted in some of them.
MacDonald was the principal director of L. Frank Baum's Oz Film Manufacturing Company, and he can frequently be seen in the films of Frank Capra, Preston Sturges and, especially, John Ford.

L. Frank Baum

Frank BaumFrank L. BaumBaum
It was founded by L. Frank Baum (president), Louis F. Gottschalk (vice president), Harry Marston Haldeman (secretary), and Clarence R. Rundel (treasurer) as an offshoot of Haldeman's social group, The Uplifters, that met at the Los Angeles Athletic Club. L. Frank Baum wrote all the scripts, and Louis F. Gottschalk wrote complete original scores that were sent out with the films, at time when improvising stock cues from the repertoire was common.
In 1914, Baum started his own film production company The Oz Film Manufacturing Company, which came as an outgrowth of the Uplifters.

Dramatic Feature Films

It was a critical but not a commercial success; even under a name change to Dramatic Feature Films, it was quickly forced to fold. Frank Joslyn Baum, Baum's eldest son and sometime attorney, who handled East Coast distribution from an office in Times Square, took over the company and renamed it Dramatic Feature Films, which made one feature and one short, probably from scripts by the younger Baum.
The office was at 300 West 42nd Street in New York City (the building that currently houses the Times Square McDonald's in its first floors), while the films were made in the Hollywood studios of The Oz Film Manufacturing Company, which was the company's former identity.

The Magic Cloak of Oz

Film
The company is best known for three of its films that survive, albeit with missing footage, today: The Patchwork Girl of Oz, The Magic Cloak of Oz, and His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz.
All of its titles are missing, and The Magic Cloak title card, which is not in The Oz Film Manufacturing Company style, is used without any additional credits.

Mildred Harris

Mildred
A newcomer on the second project, Mildred Harris, would become more famous for her marriage to Charles Chaplin.
In 1914, she was hired by The Oz Film Manufacturing Company to portray Fluff in The Magic Cloak of Oz and Button-Bright in His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz.

Violet MacMillan

Among the major players at the company were Violet MacMillan, Frank Moore, Pierre Couderc, Juanita Hansen, Mai Wells, Raymond Russell, Todd Wright, Vivian Reed, and J. Charles Haydon, with animals portrayed by Fred Woodward, who had appeared in the stage version of The Wizard of Oz back in 1902.
In motion pictures Miss MacMillan joined the stock company of The Oz Film Manufacturing Company (where she appeared in the company's logo, with her face on a black background) and debuted in the film version of The Patchwork Girl of Oz and The Magic Cloak of Oz (1914) and the lost series of L. Frank Baum-written and produced shorts, Violet's Dreams, in which she played a girl named Claribel who had fairy-tale adventures in her dreams.

Film score

film composerscorefilm music
L. Frank Baum wrote all the scripts, and Louis F. Gottschalk wrote complete original scores that were sent out with the films, at time when improvising stock cues from the repertoire was common.
In 1914, The Oz Film Manufacturing Company sent full-length scores by Louis F. Gottschalk for their films.

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz

Manufacturing
The company is best known for three of its films that survive, albeit with missing footage, today: The Patchwork Girl of Oz, The Magic Cloak of Oz, and His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz.

Vivian Reed (silent film actress)

Vivian Reed
Among the major players at the company were Violet MacMillan, Frank Moore, Pierre Couderc, Juanita Hansen, Mai Wells, Raymond Russell, Todd Wright, Vivian Reed, and J. Charles Haydon, with animals portrayed by Fred Woodward, who had appeared in the stage version of The Wizard of Oz back in 1902.
She also portrayed Princess Ozma in the introductions to films made by The Oz Film Manufacturing Company.

The Gray Nun of Belgium

Although ads announced the release of the feature film, The Gray Nun of Belgium, it does not appear to actually have been released.
The Gray Nun of Belgium was a 1915 film announced for release on the Alliance Program by Dramatic Feature Films, Frank Joslyn Baum's short-lived successor to The Oz Film Manufacturing Company.

Frank Joslyn Baum

Frank JoslynBaum, Frank JoslynFrank Baum
Frank Joslyn Baum, Baum's eldest son and sometime attorney, who handled East Coast distribution from an office in Times Square, took over the company and renamed it Dramatic Feature Films, which made one feature and one short, probably from scripts by the younger Baum.
When L. Frank Baum founded The Oz Film Manufacturing Company in 1914, Frank J. was established as the business director in the New York City office, at 300 W. 42nd Street in Times Square.

The Last Egyptian

The Alliance program released a fourth feature, The Last Egyptian, from an exotic orientalist adventure novel that Baum had written but declined authorship credit for commercial reasons, in early December.
(However, the October 17, 1914 issue of Motion Picture News stated that the film was being directed by Baum and J. Charles "Hayden" [sic].) According to a company press release, the film was representing a new direction for The Oz Film Manufacturing Company, and would be followed by adaptations of both "Schuyler Staunton" novels, The Fate of a Crown and Daughters of Destiny, although they are now both attributed to Baum with no mention of Staunton.

Independent film

independentindieindie film
The Oz Film Manufacturing Company was a short-lived independent film studio from 1914 to 1915.

Film studio

movie studiostudiofilm studios
The Oz Film Manufacturing Company was a short-lived independent film studio from 1914 to 1915.

The Uplifters (club)

The UpliftersUpliftersUplifters Club
It was founded by L. Frank Baum (president), Louis F. Gottschalk (vice president), Harry Marston Haldeman (secretary), and Clarence R. Rundel (treasurer) as an offshoot of Haldeman's social group, The Uplifters, that met at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.

Los Angeles Athletic Club

LAACLos Angeles AthleticAthletic Club
It was founded by L. Frank Baum (president), Louis F. Gottschalk (vice president), Harry Marston Haldeman (secretary), and Clarence R. Rundel (treasurer) as an offshoot of Haldeman's social group, The Uplifters, that met at the Los Angeles Athletic Club.

Western (genre)

Westernwestern filmwesterns
Its goal was to produce quality family-oriented entertainment in a time when children were primarily seeing violent Westerns.

Metro Pictures

MetroMetro Pictures CorporationMetro Pictures Corp.
Founded in 1914, it was absorbed by Metro Pictures, which evolved into Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

MGMMGM Studiosmgm.com
Founded in 1914, it was absorbed by Metro Pictures, which evolved into Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Santa Monica Boulevard

Santa MonicaSanta Monica BlvdSanta Monica boulevards
The studio was located on Santa Monica Boulevard between Gower Street and Lodi Street.

Gower Street (Los Angeles)

Gower StreetGower
The studio was located on Santa Monica Boulevard between Gower Street and Lodi Street.

Famous Players-Lasky

Famous Players-Lasky CorporationFamous Players-Lasky British ProducersFamous Players
The facility would later be used by Famous Players-Lasky (now called Paramount Pictures) and National Film Corporation of America.

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount Home Entertainment
The facility would later be used by Famous Players-Lasky (now called Paramount Pictures) and National Film Corporation of America.