The Perils of Pauline (1914 serial)

The Perils of PaulinePerils of Pauline1914of the same nameoriginalthe ''Perils of PaulineThe Perils of Pauline'' (1914 serial)those of Pauline
The Perils of Pauline is a 1914 American melodrama film serial shown in weekly installments, featuring Pearl White as the title character.wikipedia
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Serial film

film serialserialmovie serial
The Perils of Pauline is a 1914 American melodrama film serial shown in weekly installments, featuring Pearl White as the title character.
Famous American serials of the silent era include The Perils of Pauline and The Exploits of Elaine made by Pathé Frères and starring Pearl White.

Pearl White

The Perils of Pauline is a 1914 American melodrama film serial shown in weekly installments, featuring Pearl White as the title character.
Dubbed the "Queen of the Serials", White was noted for doing the majority of her own stunts in several film serials, most notably in The Perils of Pauline.

Crane Wilbur

Gasnier, as explained by Crane Wilbur, made linguistic mistakes that confused the French-speaking crew.
Wilbur is best remembered for playing Harry Marvin in The Perils of Pauline.

George B. Seitz

George SeitzGeorge B. Seitz Productions
George B. Seitz tried to follow the cliffhanging pattern of The Adventures of Kathlyn but each chapter was mostly self-contained.

Pathé

Pathé ExchangePathé FrèresPathé Distribution
He co-operated with the largest film equipment and production company in the world at that time, a France-based company named Pathé, to produce this serial, which was Pathé's first entry into the medium.
The Heights, Jersey City produced the extremely successful serialised episodes called The Perils of Pauline.

Louis J. Gasnier

Louis Gasnier
These errors have also been blamed on Louis J. Gasnier, director and supervisor of the production.
A cinema pioneer, Gasnier shepherded the early career of comedian Max Linder, co-directed the enormously successful film serial The Perils of Pauline (1914) and capped his output with the notorious low-budget exploitation film Reefer Madness (1936) which was both a critical and box office failure.

Damsel in distress

damsels in distressdamsel-in-distressdamsel
Pauline has often been remembered as a famous example of a damsel in distress, although contemporaneous reception and some analyses hold that her character was more resourceful and less helpless than the classic damsel stereotype, and she was a considerable influence on early female audiences and attracted much critical attention therefore.
One of the films most often associated with the stereotype damsel in distress, The Perils of Pauline (1914), also provides at least a partial counterexample, in that Pauline, played by Pearl White, is a strong character who decides against early marriage in favour of seeking adventure and becoming an author.

Melodrama

melodrama filmmelodramaticmelodramas
The Perils of Pauline is a 1914 American melodrama film serial shown in weekly installments, featuring Pearl White as the title character.
Early silent films, such as The Perils of Pauline had similar themes.

National Film Registry

United States National Film RegistryList of films preserved in the United States National Film RegistryLibrary of Congress National Film Registry
In 2008, The Perils of Pauline was selected by the Library of Congress for the United States National Film Registry, as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Milton Berle

Milton Berle ShowThe Milton Berle ShowBerle
Milton Berle (1908-2002) claimed The Perils of Pauline as his first film appearance, playing the character of a young boy, though this has never been independently verified.
He claimed The Perils of Pauline as his first film appearance, playing the character of a young boy, though this has never been independently verified.

Arthur Miller (cinematographer)

Arthur C. MillerArthur MillerArthur Charles Miller
The serial did mark one of the early credits for the cinematographer Arthur C. Miller, who was transferred to the project from the Pathé News department.
Miller eventually joined Pathé and, although only 19 years old, became the cinematographer for the 1914 adventure serial The Perils of Pauline.

Cliffhanger

To be continuedcliffhanger endingcliff-hanger
The term "cliffhanger" may have originated with the series, owing to a number of episodes filmed on or around the New Jersey Palisades—though it is also likely to refer to situations in stories of this type where the hero or heroine is hanging from a cliff, seemingly with no way out, until the next episode or last-minute resolution.
The most notable of these films was The Perils of Pauline, a serial which helped popularize the term cliffhanger.

The Exploits of Elaine

This successful serial was quickly followed by The Exploits of Elaine, also starring White.
The Exploits of Elaine is a 1914 American film serial in the damsel in distress genre of The Perils of Pauline (1914).

William J. Flynn

Agent William FlynnFlynn’s Weekly Detective FictionWilliam Flynn
After retiring from law enforcement, William J. Flynn, former director of the Bureau of Investigation (forerunner of the FBI), became a scenario writer for the motion picture industry through his acquaintance with the actor King Baggot, who was considered the greatest film star in the country at that time in 1912.
The producers Theodore and Leopold Wharton commissioned him to write story lines for their films, including The Perils of Pauline, and eventually adapted Flynn's experiences into a 20-part spy thriller titled The Eagle's Eye (1918), starring Baggot.

The Perils of Pauline (1933 serial)

The Perils of PaulinePerils of Pauline1933
The title The Perils of Pauline was reused by Universal Studios for a 1933 sound serial with a different plot, by Paramount Pictures as the Betty Hutton vehicle The Perils of Pauline (1947), and by Universal again in 1967 as an updated comedy.
The Perils of Pauline is a 1933 American Pre-Code film serial, and sound film remake, of the Pathé original.

The Perils of Pauline (1967 film)

The Perils of Pauline1967The Perils of Pauline'' (1967 film)
The title The Perils of Pauline was reused by Universal Studios for a 1933 sound serial with a different plot, by Paramount Pictures as the Betty Hutton vehicle The Perils of Pauline (1947), and by Universal again in 1967 as an updated comedy.
The Perils of Pauline is a 1967 American comedy film based on the movie serial of the same name.

Staten Island

Staten Island, New YorkRichmondStaten Island, NY
Scenes were also filmed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Staten Island, New York.

The Palisades (Hudson River)

Hudson PalisadesNew Jersey PalisadesPalisades
The term "cliffhanger" may have originated with the series, owing to a number of episodes filmed on or around the New Jersey Palisades—though it is also likely to refer to situations in stories of this type where the hero or heroine is hanging from a cliff, seemingly with no way out, until the next episode or last-minute resolution.
The most notable of these films was The Perils of Pauline, a serial which helped popularize the term cliffhanger.

The Perils of Pauline (1947 film)

The Perils of PaulineThe Perils of Pauline'' (1947 film)1947
The title The Perils of Pauline was reused by Universal Studios for a 1933 sound serial with a different plot, by Paramount Pictures as the Betty Hutton vehicle The Perils of Pauline (1947), and by Universal again in 1967 as an updated comedy.
Paul Panzer, who played the villain in the 1914 film The Perils of Pauline, has a very small part in this film, as do silent-comedy veterans Chester Conklin, Hank Mann, Snub Pollard, and James Finlayson.

The Perils of Penelope Pitstop

Perils of Penelope PitstopThe Hooded Claw17
The 1969–70 cartoon series The Perils of Penelope Pitstop was patterned after this serial, and included the plot point of the villain trying to eliminate the heroine so he can keep her inheritance.
The series was patterned on the silent movie era melodrama cliffhanger movie serial The Perils of Pauline.