The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)

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The Twilight Zone (marketed as Twilight Zone for its final two seasons) is an American anthology television series created and presented by Rod Serling, which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964.wikipedia
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Rod Serling

Rod Serling’sDoes the Name Grimsby Do Anything to You?Rod Sterling
The Twilight Zone (marketed as Twilight Zone for its final two seasons) is an American anthology television series created and presented by Rod Serling, which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964.
Rodman Edward "Rod" Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, playwright, television producer, and narrator known for his live television dramas of the 1950s and his science-fiction anthology TV series, The Twilight Zone.

It's a Good Life (The Twilight Zone)

It's a Good Lifean episodeepisode
In 1997, the episodes "To Serve Man" (directed by Richard L. Bare) and "It's a Good Life" (directed by James Sheldon) were respectively ranked at 11 and 31 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. Despite his avowed weariness, Serling again managed to produce several teleplays that are widely regarded as classics, including "It's a Good Life", "To Serve Man", "Little Girl Lost" and "Five Characters in Search of an Exit".
"It's a Good Life" is episode 73 of the American television series The Twilight Zone.

To Serve Man (The Twilight Zone)

To Serve Man1962 episodean episode
In 1997, the episodes "To Serve Man" (directed by Richard L. Bare) and "It's a Good Life" (directed by James Sheldon) were respectively ranked at 11 and 31 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. Despite his avowed weariness, Serling again managed to produce several teleplays that are widely regarded as classics, including "It's a Good Life", "To Serve Man", "Little Girl Lost" and "Five Characters in Search of an Exit".
"To Serve Man" is episode 89 of the anthology series The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series).

Time Enough at Last

an episode
Serling himself stated that his favorite episodes of the series were "The Invaders" (directed by Douglas Heyes) and "Time Enough at Last" (directed by John Brahm). Many of the season's episodes proved to be among the series' most celebrated, including "Time Enough at Last," "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street," "Walking Distance," and "The After Hours."
"Time Enough at Last" is the eighth episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

The Invaders (The Twilight Zone)

The InvadersThe Invaders" (''The Twilight Zone'')
Serling himself stated that his favorite episodes of the series were "The Invaders" (directed by Douglas Heyes) and "Time Enough at Last" (directed by John Brahm). Season two saw the production of many of the series' most acclaimed episodes, including "The Eye of the Beholder," "Nick of Time," "The Invaders," and "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?."
"The Invaders" is episode 15 of season 2 (and episode 51 overall) of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

CBS

Columbia Broadcasting SystemCBS TelevisionCBS-TV
The Twilight Zone (marketed as Twilight Zone for its final two seasons) is an American anthology television series created and presented by Rod Serling, which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964.
So the network had challenging fare like The Twilight Zone, The Defenders, and East Side/West Side, as well as The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., and Gilligan's Island.

Douglas Heyes

Serling himself stated that his favorite episodes of the series were "The Invaders" (directed by Douglas Heyes) and "Time Enough at Last" (directed by John Brahm).
The Twilight Zone – 1959 series

Science fiction on television

science fiction televisionscience fictionscience fiction television series
Although predominantly science-fiction, the show's paranormal and Kafkaesque events leaned the show towards fantasy and horror.
U.S. television science fiction has produced Star Trek and its various spin-off shows of the Star Trek franchise, The Twilight Zone, The X-Files, and many others.

The Twilight Zone

Twilight ZoneThe Time Elementclassic TV series
"The Time Element" was Serling's 1957 pilot pitch for his show, a time travel adventure about a man who travels back to Honolulu in 1941 and unsuccessfully tries to warn everyone about the impending attack on Pearl Harbor.
The original series, shot entirely in black and white, ran on CBS for five seasons from 1959 to 1964.

Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse

Desilu Playhouse
The script, however, was rejected and shelved for a year until Bert Granet discovered and produced it as an episode of Desilu Playhouse in 1958.
Two of its 48 episodes served as pilots for the 1950s television series The Twilight Zone and The Untouchables.

Mr. Denton on Doomsday

The series' future was jeopardized when its third episode, "Mr. Denton on Doomsday" earned a 16.3 rating.
"Mr. Denton on Doomsday" is episode three of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Walking Distance

Many of the season's episodes proved to be among the series' most celebrated, including "Time Enough at Last," "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street," "Walking Distance," and "The After Hours."
"Walking Distance" is episode five of the American television series The Twilight Zone.

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street

Twilight Zone
Many of the season's episodes proved to be among the series' most celebrated, including "Time Enough at Last," "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street," "Walking Distance," and "The After Hours."
"The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street" is episode 22 in the first season of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Charles Beaumont

With one exception ("The Chaser"), the first season featured scripts written only by Rod Serling, Charles Beaumont or Richard Matheson.
He is remembered as a writer of classic Twilight Zone episodes, such as "The Howling Man", "Miniature", "Printer's Devil", and "Number Twelve Looks Just Like You", but also penned the screenplays for several films, among them 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, The Intruder, and The Masque of the Red Death.

A World of His Own

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Additionally, with one exception ("A World of His Own"), Serling never appeared on camera during any first-season episode (as he would in future seasons), and was present only as a voice-over narrator.
"A World of His Own" is episode thirty-six of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

The Chaser (The Twilight Zone)

The ChaserThe Chaser" (''The Twilight Zone'')
With one exception ("The Chaser"), the first season featured scripts written only by Rod Serling, Charles Beaumont or Richard Matheson.
"The Chaser" is episode 31 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Richard L. Bare

Richard Bare
In 1997, the episodes "To Serve Man" (directed by Richard L. Bare) and "It's a Good Life" (directed by James Sheldon) were respectively ranked at 11 and 31 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time.
On television, he directed seven classic The Twilight Zone episodes: "To Serve Man", "What's in the Box?", "The Fugitive", "Third from the Sun", "The Purple Testament", "Nick of Time" and "The Prime Mover".

The After Hours

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Many of the season's episodes proved to be among the series' most celebrated, including "Time Enough at Last," "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street," "Walking Distance," and "The After Hours."
"The After Hours" is episode thirty-four of the American television anthology series, The Twilight Zone.

King Nine Will Not Return

King Nine'' Will Not Return
The second season premiered on September 30, 1960 with "King Nine Will Not Return," Serling's fresh take on the pilot episode "Where Is Everybody?" The familiarity of this first story stood in stark contrast to the novelty of the show's new packaging: Bernard Herrmann's stately original theme was replaced by Marius Constant's more jarring and dissonant (and now more-familiar) new guitar-and-bongo theme.
"King Nine Will Not Return" is the season two premiere episode, and 37th overall, of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

George Clayton Johnson

George C. Johnson
The trio of Serling, Matheson and Beaumont began to admit new writers, and this season saw the television debut of George Clayton Johnson.
He was also known for his television scripts for The Twilight Zone (including "Nothing in the Dark", "Kick the Can", "A Game of Pool", and "A Penny for Your Thoughts"), and the first telecast episode of Star Trek, entitled "The Man Trap".

Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?

Season two saw the production of many of the series' most acclaimed episodes, including "The Eye of the Beholder," "Nick of Time," "The Invaders," and "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?."
"Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?" is episode 64 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. It originally aired on May 26, 1961 on CBS.

Nick of Time (The Twilight Zone)

Nick of TimeNick of Time" (''The Twilight Zone'')
Season two saw the production of many of the series' most acclaimed episodes, including "The Eye of the Beholder," "Nick of Time," "The Invaders," and "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?."
"Nick of Time" is episode 43 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Buck Houghton

The first season won Serling an unprecedented fourth Emmy Award for dramatic writing, a Producers Guild Award for Serling's creative partner Buck Houghton, a Directors Guild Award for John Brahm and the Hugo Award for best dramatic presentation.
Archible Ernest "Buck" Houghton (May 4, 1915 – May 14, 1999) was an American television producer and writer best known for producing the first three seasons of The Twilight Zone, as well as many other television programs from the 1950s through the 1990s.

Little Girl Lost (The Twilight Zone)

Little Girl Lost
Despite his avowed weariness, Serling again managed to produce several teleplays that are widely regarded as classics, including "It's a Good Life", "To Serve Man", "Little Girl Lost" and "Five Characters in Search of an Exit".
"Little Girl Lost" is episode 91 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

Five Characters in Search of an Exit

Despite his avowed weariness, Serling again managed to produce several teleplays that are widely regarded as classics, including "It's a Good Life", "To Serve Man", "Little Girl Lost" and "Five Characters in Search of an Exit".
"Five Characters in Search of an Exit" is episode 79 of the television anthology series The Twilight Zone.