The Vision of Escaflowne

EscaflowneLa Visión de Escaflownesoundtrack for the ''Vision of Escaflowne'' animeTenku no EscaflowneThe Vision of Escaflowne Original Soundtrack 1The Vision of Escaflowne Original Soundtrack 3Vision of Escaflowne
The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.wikipedia
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Sunrise (company)

SunriseNippon SunriseSunrise Inc.
The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.
One of Japan's largest and best-known studios, Sunrise is renowned for critically praised and popular original anime series such as Gundam, Cowboy Bebop, Space Runaway Ideon, Armored Trooper Votoms, Yoroiden Samurai Troopers, Future GPX Cyber Formula, Crush Gear Turbo, The Vision of Escaflowne, Love Live School Idol Project, Witch Hunter Robin, My-HiME, My-Otome, Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion, Tiger & Bunny, Cross Ange: Rondo of Angel and Dragon, as well as its numerous adaptations of acclaimed light novels including Dirty Pair, Horizon in the Middle of Nowhere and Accel World, and manga such as City Hunter, InuYasha, Outlaw Star, Yakitate!! Japan, Planetes, Keroro Gunso, Gin Tama, and Kekkaishi.

Kazuki Akane

The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.
Until the early 2000s, he was a staff member of the anime studio Sunrise, where he collaborated with Shoji Kawamori to direct his most famous work, The Vision of Escaflowne.

Escaflowne (film)

EscaflowneEscaflowne: The MovieEscaflowne - The Movie
A movie adaptation, entitled simply Escaflowne, was released on June 24, 2000, but bears only a basic resemblance to the original series.
Directed by Kazuki Akane, the film is a re-telling of the 26-episode anime television series The Vision of Escaflowne.

Yoko Kanno

Kanno, YokoYōko Kanno
With the series character designs finalized and the story set, Yoko Kanno was selected to write the songs for the series, including the background songs which she co-wrote with her then-husband Hajime Mizoguchi, with whom she had previously collaborated on the soundtrack for Please Save My Earth. Performed by Hiroki Wada, "Mystic Eyes" is used for the ending theme for the first twenty-five episodes, while the final episode uses Yoko Kanno's instrumental piece "The Story of Escaflowne ~ End Title" .
She has written scores for Cowboy Bebop, Darker than Black, Macross Plus, Turn A Gundam, The Vision of Escaflowne, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex, Wolf's Rain, Kids on the Slope and Terror in Resonance, and has worked with the directors Yoshiyuki Tomino, Shinichirō Watanabe and Shōji Kawamori.

Mecha

mechgiant robotmechs
According to Kawamori, his pitch for the series was simple: "if Macross was robotic mecha and love songs, why not a story about robotic mecha and divining powers?"
Mecha have been used in fantasy settings, for example in the anime series Aura Battler Dunbine, The Vision of Escaflowne, Panzer World Galient and Maze.

Maaya Sakamoto

Sakamoto, MaayaSakamoto Maaya
16-year-old Maaya Sakamoto, fresh from a small role in the anime adaptation of Mizuiro Jidai, was selected not only as the voice of Hitomi, but also to sing the Escaflowne theme song.
She made her debut as a voice actress in 1992 as the voice of Chifuru in Little Twins, but is better known as voice of Hitomi Kanzaki in The Vision of Escaflowne.

Bandai Visual

Bandai EntertainmentEmotionBandai
The series was licensed for Region 1 release by Bandai Entertainment. Produced by Saban Entertainment under license by Bandai Entertainment, these dubbed episodes were heavily edited to remove footage, add new "flashback" sequences to remind the audience of the events that just occurred, and to heavily downplay the role of Hitomi in the series.

Animax

Animax Broadcast Japan Inc.Animax-AsiaAnimax Brasil
Sony's anime satellite channel, Animax also aired the series, both in Japan and on its various worldwide networks, including Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia.
The programs that aired on the block were Planetes, The Vision of Escaflowne, .hack//SIGN, and Noein.

TV Tokyo

TXTokyo Channel 12BS Japan
It premiered in Japan on April 2, 1996 on TV Tokyo, and the final episode aired on September 24, 1996.
The Vision of Escaflowne

Mobile Fighter G Gundam

G GundamFuture CenturyFuunsaiki
However, he left the project before actual production started to direct Mobile Fighter G Gundam.
Kimitoshi Yamane acted as a back-up mechanical designer and has since worked on Sunrise's acclaimed series Cowboy Bebop and The Vision of Escaflowne.

Inon Zur

The first episode was skipped altogether, and the series soundtrack produced by Yoko Kanno was partially replaced with more techno rearrangements by Inon Zur.
He continued to work on movies and television programs during these years, composing the soundtrack to Au Pair in 1999 and the English version of the 2000 anime series Escaflowne.

H-Wonder

Performed by Hiroki Wada, "Mystic Eyes" is used for the ending theme for the first twenty-five episodes, while the final episode uses Yoko Kanno's instrumental piece "The Story of Escaflowne ~ End Title" .
Mystic Eyes - 24 April 1996 (Ending theme for the anime series The Vision of Escaflowne)

Monthly Shōnen Ace

Shōnen AceAce NextGekkan Shōnen Ace
The first series, also titled The Vision of Escaflowne was one of the first manga series to appear in the then new Shōnen Ace magazine from Kadokawa Shoten.
The Vision of Escaflowne (shōnen version; shōjo version was serialized in Asuka Fantasy DX)

Tokyopop

Tokyopop GermanyBluMixx
It was licensed for released in North America by Tokyopop with the first volume released on July 10, 2003.
In 1996, Mixx Entertainment acquired the rights to the anime biopic of Japanese poet Kenji Miyazawa, and Stu Levy produced and directed the English version of the anime film, entitled “Spring and Chaos.” The film was directed and scripted by Shoji Kawamori, who created Super Dimensional Fortress Macross and The Vision of Escaflowne.

Saban Entertainment

SabanSaban InternationalSaban Productions
Produced by Saban Entertainment under license by Bandai Entertainment, these dubbed episodes were heavily edited to remove footage, add new "flashback" sequences to remind the audience of the events that just occurred, and to heavily downplay the role of Hitomi in the series.
Escaflowne (2000)

Katsu Aki

Despite the anime series itself being on hold, Sunrise gave artist Katsu Aki the existing production and character designs, resulting in the first manga series having the heavy shōnen feel and curvaceous Hitomi that was originally planned for the anime series.
Katsuaki Nakamura, pen name Katsu Aki, is a Japanese manga artist best known for his works The Vision of Escaflowne, Futari Ecchi, and Psychic Academy.

Nobuteru Yūki

Nobuteru Yuuki
Nobuteru Yuki was hired as the character designer, and tasked with crafting a design for Hitomi and the rest of the cast.
He has designed characters for manga, anime and video games, and has frequently collaborated with director Kazuki Akane, including on his most famous work, The Vision of Escaflowne.

Shōji Kawamori

Shoji Kawamori
Shoji Kawamori first proposed the series after a trip to Nepal, during which he visited the foggy mountain region and pictured a hidden world where an epic focusing on both fate and divination should be set.
Later on his career Kawamori created or co-created the concepts which served as basis for several anime series such as The Super Dimension Fortress Macross, The Vision of Escaflowne, Earth Maiden Arjuna, Genesis of Aquarion, Macross 7, Macross Frontier, and Macross Delta.

Bandai

Bandai EntertainmentBandai VisualBandai America
A video game based on the series, also titled The Vision of Escaflowne was released to the PlayStation system by Bandai Games in 1997.
These titles include Cowboy Bebop, Big O, Outlaw Star, Please Teacher!, Escaflowne, and the popular Gundam, Kamen Rider, Ultraman, and Super Sentai series.

Kadokawa Shoten

KadokawaKadokawa GamesKadokawa Media
The first series, also titled The Vision of Escaflowne was one of the first manga series to appear in the then new Shōnen Ace magazine from Kadokawa Shoten.
The Vision of Escaflowne

Episode

episodicepisodestelevision episode
The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.

Anime

animatedJapanese animationJapanese animated
The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.

Television show

television seriestelevision programseries
The Vision of Escaflowne is a 26-episode Japanese anime television series produced by Sunrise Studios and directed by Kazuki Akane.

Satellite television

satellitedirect broadcast satellitesatellite TV
Sony's anime satellite channel, Animax also aired the series, both in Japan and on its various worldwide networks, including Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia.

Taiwan

🇹🇼FormosaRepublic of China
Sony's anime satellite channel, Animax also aired the series, both in Japan and on its various worldwide networks, including Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia.