The exchange (chess)

the exchangeexchangeexchange sacrificean exchangepositional exchange sacrificesacrifice the exchangesacrificing the exchangeThe exchange of a rook for bishop or knight
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.wikipedia
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Bishop (chess)

bishopbishopschess bishop
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.
A rook is generally worth about two pawns more than a bishop (see Chess piece relative value and the exchange).

Rook (chess)

rookrookschess rook
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.
Winning a rook for a bishop or knight is referred to as winning the exchange.

Exchange (chess)

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Note that the exchange differs from the more general "exchange" or "an exchange", which refers to the loss and subsequent gain of arbitrary pieces, for example to "exchange queens" would mean that each side's queen is captured.
The exchange of a rook for bishop or knight is an uneven exchange because a rook is generally more valuable than a bishop or knight.

Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.
The point values used for this purpose are based on experience; usually pawns are considered worth one point, knights and bishops about three points each, rooks about five points (the value difference between a rook and a bishop or knight being known as the exchange), and queens about nine points.

Chess piece relative value

pointsvalueschess piece value
The side which wins the rook is said to have won the exchange, while the other player has lost the exchange, since the rook is usually more valuable.
Many of the systems have a 2-point difference between the rook and a minor piece, but most theorists put that difference at about 1 1⁄2 points, see The exchange (chess)#Value of the exchange.

Tigran Petrosian

PetrosianTigran PetrosyanTigran V. Petrosian
Tigran Petrosian thought that one pawn was the right value.
Petrosian was known for his use of the "positional exchange sacrifice", where one side sacrifices a rook for the opponent's bishop or knight.

Pawnless chess endgame

queen versus rookpawnless endgamepawnless endgames
In an endgame without pawns, the advantage of the exchange is normally not enough to win (see pawnless chess endgame).
In his landmark 1941 book Basic Chess Endings, Reuben Fine inaccurately stated, "Without pawns one must be at least a Rook ahead in order to be able to mate. The only exceptions to this that hold in all cases are that the double exchange wins and that a Queen cannot successfully defend against four minor pieces."

Sacrifice (chess)

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The exchange sacrifice contrasts with other sacrifices in that during the early-middle to middle game the board is sufficiently crowded to where the rook is not as effective as an active knight or a good bishop, this is why such exchange sacrifices happen usually from moves 20 to 30, and rarely occur in the later moves.
Exchange sacrifice

Chess strategy

strategystrategiccontrol of the center
Chess strategy
Under a system like this, giving up a knight or bishop to win a rook ("winning the exchange") is advantageous and is worth about two pawns.

Compensation (chess)

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During the game, many spectating grandmasters were sceptical whether White's compensation was enough.
An unbalanced position has arisen straight out of the opening, in which, with an open centre, Black has a pawn and the for the exchange.

Knight (chess)

knightknightsKnight's Move
The exchange in chess refers to a situation in which one player loses a minor piece (i.e. a bishop or knight) but captures the opponent's rook.

Siegbert Tarrasch

Tarraschbeautiful example by TarraschS. Tarrasch
Siegbert Tarrasch put its value as 1½ pawns in the endgame, but not for the opening or the first part of the middlegame.

Pawn (chess)

pawnpawnschess pawn
Siegbert Tarrasch put its value as 1½ pawns in the endgame, but not for the opening or the first part of the middlegame.

Chess endgame

endgameendgamesending
Siegbert Tarrasch put its value as 1½ pawns in the endgame, but not for the opening or the first part of the middlegame.

Chess opening

openingopeningsopening moves
Siegbert Tarrasch put its value as 1½ pawns in the endgame, but not for the opening or the first part of the middlegame.

Chess middlegame

middlegamemiddle gamemiddlegames
Siegbert Tarrasch put its value as 1½ pawns in the endgame, but not for the opening or the first part of the middlegame.

Jacob Sarratt

Jacob Henry SarrattSarratt
That is widely accepted today, but Jacob Sarratt, Howard Staunton, and José Capablanca felt that the exchange was worth two pawns.

Howard Staunton

Staunton
That is widely accepted today, but Jacob Sarratt, Howard Staunton, and José Capablanca felt that the exchange was worth two pawns.

Wilhelm Steinitz

SteinitzWilliam SteinitzSteinitz, William
Wilhelm Steinitz said that a rook is slightly better than a knight and two pawns but slightly worse than a bishop and two pawns.

Cecil Purdy

C. J. S. PurdyC.J.S. PurdyC J S Purdy
Cecil Purdy said that the value depends on the total number of pawns on the board.

Edmar Mednis

MednisMednis, Edmar
Edmar Mednis gave the value as 1½ in the endgame,.

Max Euwe

EuweEuwe, Max
Max Euwe put the value at 1½ in the middlegame and said that two pawns are more than sufficient compensation for the exchange.

Larry Kaufman

Larry Kaufman's computer research puts the value as 1¾ pawns, but only 1¼ pawns if the player with the minor piece has the.

Hans Berliner

BerlinerBerliner, HansHans Jack Berliner (deceased)
Hans Berliner puts the difference between a rook and knight as 1.9 pawns and the difference between a rook and a bishop as 1.77 pawns.

Passed pawn

passed pawnspassedconnected passed pawn
In the endgame of a rook and a pawn versus a knight and a pawn, if the pawns are passed the rook is much stronger and should win.