Theaetetus (dialogue)

TheaetetusTheatetuseponymous Socratic dialogueTheaetet.Theaetetus'' (dialogue)TheätetTheætetus
The Theaetetus is one of Plato's dialogues concerning the nature of knowledge, written circa 369 BCE.wikipedia
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Epistemology

epistemologicalepistemictheory of knowledge
The Theaetetus is one of Plato's dialogues concerning the nature of knowledge, written circa 369 BCE.
In the Theaetetus, Socrates considers a number of theories as to what knowledge is, the last being that knowledge is true belief "with an account" (meaning explained or defined in some way).

Plato

dialoguesPlato's dialoguesPlatonic dialogue
The Theaetetus is one of Plato's dialogues concerning the nature of knowledge, written circa 369 BCE.
In the Theaetetus, he says such people are eu amousoi, an expression that means literally, "happily without the muses" (Theaetetus 156a).

Theodorus of Cyrene

Theodorus
Socrates asks Theodorus if he knows of any geometry students who show particular promise.
Theodorus of Cyrene was an ancient Libyan Greek and lived during the 5th century BC. The only first-hand accounts of him that survive are in three of Plato's dialogues: the Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Statesman.

Euclid of Megara

EuclidesEuclidEuclide of Megara
The dialogue is framed by a brief scene in which Euclid of Megara tells his friend Terpsion that he has a written record of a dialogue between Socrates and Theaetetus, which occurred when Theaetetus was quite a young man.
He is represented in the preface of Plato's Theaetetus as being responsible for writing down the conversation between Socrates and the young Theaetetus many years earlier.

Socratic method

Socraticmaieuticelenchus
Socrates considers his philosophical work as midwifery (Maieutics).
This method is named after the Classical Greek philosopher Socrates and is introduced by him in Plato's Theaetetus as midwifery (maieutics) because it is employed to bring out definitions implicit in the interlocutors' beliefs, or to help them further their understanding.

Theaetetus (mathematician)

TheaetetusTheaetetus of AthensTheaetetus of Sunium
In this dialogue, Socrates and Theaetetus discuss three definitions of knowledge: knowledge as nothing but perception, knowledge as true judgment, and, finally, knowledge as a true judgment with an account. Each of these definitions is shown to be unsatisfactory.
A friend of Socrates and Plato, he is the central character in Plato's eponymous Socratic dialogue.

Heraclitus

panta rheiHeracliteanHeraclitus of Ephesus
Socrates wrestles to conflate the two ideas, and stirs in for good measure a claim about Homer being the captain of a team of Heraclitan flux theorists.
With regard to education, Diogenes says that Heraclitus was "wondrous" (thaumasios, which, as Socrates explains in Plato's Theaetetus and Gorgias, is the beginning of philosophy) from childhood.

Terpsion

The dialogue is framed by a brief scene in which Euclid of Megara tells his friend Terpsion that he has a written record of a dialogue between Socrates and Theaetetus, which occurred when Theaetetus was quite a young man.
He appears in the prologue of Plato's Theaetetus as a friend of Euclid of Megara.

Protagoras

Protagoras of Abdera
Socrates thinks that the idea that knowledge is perception must be identical in meaning, if not in actual words, to Protagoras' famous maxim "Man is the measure of all things."
However, as described in Plato's Theaetetus, Protagoras's views allow that some views may result from an ill body or mind.

Epicharmus of Kos

Epicharmus
In this dialogue, Socrates refers to Epicharmus of Kos as "the prince of Comedy" and Homer as "the prince of Tragedy", and both as "great masters of either kind of poetry".
Plato mentions Epicharmus in his dialogue Gorgias and in Theaetetus.

Parmenides

ParmenideanParmenides of EleaAmeinias
Socrates says he met the father of the idea, Parmenides, when he was quite young, but does not want to get into another digression over it.
In the Theaetetus, Socrates says that Parmenides alone among the wise (Protagoras, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Epicharmus, and Homer) denied that everything is change and motion.

Meletus

Socrates concludes the dialogue by announcing that all the two have produced are mere "wind-eggs" and that he must be getting on now to the courthouse to face his trial being brought against him by Meletus.
Meletus is also mentioned briefly in the Theaetetus.

Lewis Campbell (classicist)

Lewis CampbellCampbell, L.
Campbell, L., The Theaetetus of Plato. Oxford University Press, 1883.
The Theaetetus of Plato Greek text with English notes (2nd ed., 1883)

Knowledge

knowhuman knowledgesituated knowledge
In this dialogue, Socrates and Theaetetus discuss three definitions of knowledge: knowledge as nothing but perception, knowledge as true judgment, and, finally, knowledge as a true judgment with an account. Each of these definitions is shown to be unsatisfactory.

Perception

perceptualsensoryperceive
In this dialogue, Socrates and Theaetetus discuss three definitions of knowledge: knowledge as nothing but perception, knowledge as true judgment, and, finally, knowledge as a true judgment with an account. Each of these definitions is shown to be unsatisfactory.

Trial of Socrates

trialdeath of Socratestrial for impiety and corruption
The conversation ends with Socrates' announcement that he has to go to court to face a criminal indictment.

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
The dialogue is framed by a brief scene in which Euclid of Megara tells his friend Terpsion that he has a written record of a dialogue between Socrates and Theaetetus, which occurred when Theaetetus was quite a young man.

Geometry

geometricgeometricalgeometries
Socrates asks Theodorus if he knows of any geometry students who show particular promise.

Human nose

nosenasalala of the nose
He says that the boy, Theaetetus, is a young Socrates look-alike, rather homely, with a snub-nose and protruding eyes.

Orphan

orphansorphanedwar orphan
The two older men spot Theaetetus rubbing himself down with oil, and Theodorus reviews the facts about him, that he is intelligent, virile, and an orphan whose inheritance has been squandered by trustees.

Midwifery

midwivesmidwifematernity care
Socrates says he has modelled his career after his midwife mother.

Homer

HomericHomer’sHomeric epics
Socrates wrestles to conflate the two ideas, and stirs in for good measure a claim about Homer being the captain of a team of Heraclitan flux theorists. In this dialogue, Socrates refers to Epicharmus of Kos as "the prince of Comedy" and Homer as "the prince of Tragedy", and both as "great masters of either kind of poetry".

Fallacy

informal fallacyfallaciesSophists
Putting words in the dead sophist's mouth, Socrates declares that Protagoras asserts with his maxim that all things are in motion and whatever seems to be the case, is the case for the perceiver, whether the individual or the state.

Motion (physics)

motionmovementlocomotion
Putting words in the dead sophist's mouth, Socrates declares that Protagoras asserts with his maxim that all things are in motion and whatever seems to be the case, is the case for the perceiver, whether the individual or the state.

Individual

individualityindividualsIndividual federal taxes
Putting words in the dead sophist's mouth, Socrates declares that Protagoras asserts with his maxim that all things are in motion and whatever seems to be the case, is the case for the perceiver, whether the individual or the state.